Collection Title: Barry Dock news

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
6 articles on this page
Advertising

B M IlM |1,11,11 — | — ■ ■■■■ ??/ THE HAPPIEST DAY OF YOUR UFE^Bp^ jfkshould be crowned by the thought that the symbol of your wedding joy is the most perfect «Si8ir g« I ?fT?? ?-J7 that money can buy. H. Samuel's "Lucky" Wedding Rings are perfect-perfect mbeauty,/????? pK^ | | |I f■rHm p' *} fc\\». vnw\wvuvw\i B EEC HAM'S i i | ? p1 -J j ? -nothin; else will serve. Everywhere they are regarded as an idedl :edi:inehere" + no country on the globe where they are not asked for, and the better they are known the «► more they are appreciated. This should "give furiously to think." There mast be a i $ reason far beyond that arising from mere advertisement. Publicity is essential in order to «► £ bring any article to the notice of the world; but it ty no means ensures success, as the j $ flippant sometimes imagine. Success, solid and sustained, is achieved by merit alone. The + position occupied by Beecham's Pills is a striking illustration of this truth. It is eunicient J* .$ to take them once, to become convinced of their unique value as a general and family $ ? medicine. That is the secret of their popularity. They never disappoint anyone. They £ ? effectively perform what is promised for them. Their office is to restore and preserve the $ health and to those who have experienced their high efficiency, they are j AN ABSOLUTE NECESSITY. There is no manner of doubt that the sensible use of Beecham's Pills would put new life into manypeople who are new little better than chronic invalids. People whose appetite is generally indifferent, whose liver and bowels are usually sluggish, whose blood is always 5 ? more or less out of order-how can they be well 7 How can they be free from recurring 2 J headache and bilious trouble, lassitude and depression ? The important organs of digestion f t 5 Md&feimilation are really never acting properly or in harmony. Under such conditions life J ) may be bearable, but never happy, never rich, full, joyous, sufficient for itoelf, a very f ourtain t £ of gladness day by day, in gloom or sunshine. Those who suffer from dyspepsia, bilious and ££ liver disorders, constipation and the inevitable decline of nervous force should adopt the systematic use of BEECHAM'S PILLS—a remedy of great value and small cost, which is £ WITHIN THE REACH OF ALL. | SOLD EVERYWHERE IN BOXES PRICE 1/11 (56 PILLS) & 2/9 (168 PILLS). IwvwvwwwwwmuvvwkUiwwrtwwuwwmwuwuMw EMERSON, 15, HOLTON ROAD, BARRY DOCK, FOR Repairs, Accessories,&c. LOWEST PRICES- Agent for SWIFTS, and ROYAL ENFIELDS. A _A'1.MJ- f!> GEAR & DURE, j The Ironmongers, | A ,ND Successful Housekeeping. | 1 We have a complete range of Modern Labour Saving Requisites in Stock and, B 1 we invite you to come in and see with what little expense you can B make your home-life easier. 9 | We would remind you of our Workshop Department for I I Plumbing and Sanitary Engineering, Gasfitting, Sheet 1 g Metal Working, and Bell Fitters. | 218, HOLTON ROAD, I TELEPHONE: 174. g, A WONDERFUL SALE i OF Furniture, Pianofortes, ETC. In preparation for the Annual Stocktaking at end of the financial year on March 31st (by which date the stock must be greatly reduced), the whole of the goods at their various Branches are now being offered fully twenty-five per cent. under usual prices by BEVAN & COMPANY, LTD., REGISTERED AS THE CARDIFF FURNISHERS." THE SPECIAL ATTENTION OF Easter Wedding Couples Is directed to this very favourable opportunity of obtaining the reliable goods of this well-known Firm at such extremely low prices Illustrated Catalogues gratis and post free. Free delivery of all goods by road or rail up to 200 miies from either of our numerous Branches. BEVAN & COMPANY, LTD., Wales' Largest Furnishers, Pianoforte & Organ Merchants, NEAR EMPIRE, & 97, ST. MARY STREET, CARDIFF, And throughout South Wales and Monmouthshire. THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED IN THE BARRY AND OADOXTON DISTRICT. -—???  ?'???????? —-—— — ? ?? DAVID eu, F,141TUFL,l REMO CD RCID 0R IARI RAIJLL *REB ??__ 

THINGS THOUGHTFUL

THINGS THOUGHTFUL. If a face wants to smile, let it; if it doesn't, make it. A WORD TO BOYS. Boys, did you ever think that this world, with all its wealth and woe, with all ite mines &nd mountains, oceans, 6eas, and rivers; with all its shipping, its steamboats, railroads, and magnetic telegTaphs; with all its millions of grouping men, and all the science and progress of ages, will soon be given over to boys of the present age-boys like you? Believe it, and look abroad upon your inheritance, and get ready to ent-er upon its possession. The presidents, kings, governors, statesmen, philosophers, minis- ters, teachers, men of the future-all are boys now. INFLUENCE. The smallest bark cu life's tumultuous ocean Will leave a track behind for evermore; The lightest waves of influence, once in motion, Extends and widens to the eternal shore. We should be wary, then, who go before A myriad yet to be, and we should take Our bearing carefully, where breakers roar, And fearful tempests gather, one mistake May wreck unnumbered barks that follow in our wake. THE QUALITY OF FORTUNE. All superiority and pre-eminence that one man can have over another, may be reduced to the notion of quality, which, considered at large, is either that of fortune, body, or mind. The first is that which consists in birth, title, or riches; and is the most foreign to our natures, and what we can the Wast call our own, of any of the tliree kinds of quality. In relation to -ths body, quality j anscs from health, strength, or beauty; which are nearer to us, and more a part of ourselves, than 'th" former. Quality, as it regards the mind, has its rise from kDow- lodge or virtue; and is that which is more essential to us, and more intimately united N, itli us, than either of the other two. The quality of fortune, though a man has less value himself upon it than on that of the body or mind, is, however, the kind of quality which makes the most shining figure in the eye of the world.—Addi.-?on. WATCII THE CORNERS. Vv hen you wake up in the morning of a chill and cheerless day. And feel inclined to grumble, pout, or frown, Just glance into your mirror, and you will quickly see It's just because the corners of your mouth turn down. Then take this simple rhyme, Remember all the time It's always dreary weather, in countryside or town, When you wake up in the morning, with your mouth turned down. If you wake up in the morning full of bright and happy thoughts, And begin to count the blessings in your cup; Then glance into your mirror, and you will quickly see It's all because the corners of your mouth turn up. Then take this little rhyme: Remember all the time: There's joy a-plenty in this world to fill life's silver cup If you'll only keep the corners of your mouth turned up. GOOD MANNER?. I have seen manners that make a similar impression with personal beauty, that give the like exhilaration, and refine us like that; and, in memorable experiences, they are suddenly better than beautv, and make that superfluous and ugly. But they must be marked by fine perception, the acquaint- ance with real beauty. They must always show self-control: you shall" not be facile, apologetic, or leaky, but king over your word; and every gesture and action shall indicate power at rest. Th?u they must be inspired by the good heart.—R. W. Emer- *on. REVERENCE FOR AGE. Bow low the head. boy, do reverence to the old man, once like you; the vicissitudes of life have silvered his hair, and changed the round, merry face to the worn visage before you; once that manly form stalked promptly through the 'gay scenes of pleasure, the beau ideal of grace; now the hand of time that withers the flowers of yesterday, has bent that figure and destroyed that noble carriage; once, at your age, he possessed the thousand thoughts that pass through your brain, now wishing to accomplish deeds equal to a nook in fame. But he has lived the dream very nearly through; his eye never kindles at old deeds of daring, and the hand takes a firmer grasp of the staff. Bow low the head, 'boy, as you would in your old age be rever- one,ed. CHOICE. Not what we have, but what we use, Not what we see, but wh~t we choose These are the things that mar or bless The sum of human happiness. The thing near by, not that afar, Not what we seem, but what we are; These are the things that make or break. That give the heart its joy or ache. Not what seems fair, but what is true; Not what we dream, but what we do; These are the things that shine like gems. Like stars in fortune's diadems. Not a-a we take, but as we give, Not as we pray, but as we live; These are the things that make for peace, Both now and after time shall cease. GENIUS AND TALENT. Here is the distinction between genius and talent. Genius is that which is good for play, talent that which is good for work. The genius is an inspired man, a man whose action is liberty, whose creations are their own end and joy. Therefore we speak, not of the man's doing this or that, but of the man's genius as doing it; as if there were some second spirit attendant, yielding him thoughts, senses, imaginations, fires of emo- tion, that are abowe his measure-lifting him thus into exaltations of freedom and power that partake of a certain divine quality. Talent, on the other hand, we conceive to be of the man himself, a capa- city that is valuable as related to ends and uses, such as the acquisition of knowledge or money, to build, cultivate, teach, frame polities, manage causes, fill magistracies. He who is much alone with his best self will not long be under the sway of his lower self. INFIDELITY. Infidelity gives nothing in return for what it takes away; it can only exist in the shape that a diseased mind imparts to one of its coinages, a mass of base money, that will not pass current with any heart that loves truly, or any head that thinks correctly. And infidels are poor, sad creatures; they carry about them a load of dejection and desolation, not the less heavy that it is invisible. It is the fearful blindness of th* teoul -Chalmers. ✓

j TO EAT WAS TO SUFFER I

TO EAT WAS TO SUFFER. I I XERVOLS IXDIGESTIOX COMPLETELY CURED BY D l l,. CASSET, T DR. CASSELL'S TABLETS. Tiie following extraordinary story proves once again that Dr. Casself's Tablets can. restore health, and strength to weak, dyspep- t-o, nervous men and women when all or- dinary means fail. Mrs. Elizabeth Ham- mond, of Llanhennock, Caeileon, near Newport, Men., speaking to an in- terviewer recently, said: Dr. Cassell's Tablets cured me when I was wasted to a shadow and so utterly strengthles that I could hardly move at all. For nine vearsl this had gone on, though I Mrs. Hammond Lad been to doctors and a Newport. hospital. I was lu-vcr free from indigestion, so severe that I droadea iood. Every morsel I ate caused torturing pain in my chest, until I Jiad thrown all up again. Naturally I waited away. ] used to lie on a couch for hours utterly exhausted. Jkly head ached f right- iuily. <11id I could rot sleep at .night. The bed seemed to rock under me. I was badly constipated, .too. I used to long to scream, T fc't so miserable, and I was sure my end was near. But about three months ago a friend got mo seme Dr. Cabell's Tablets, and from the first dose I steadily improved. To- day 1 am as well and strong is ever in my life." The wonderful power of Dr. Cassoll's Tab- iet.s to cure nerve-failure, stontacli and kid- ney weakness, and general vital depletion in old or young makes them the surest remedy ever devised for Nervous .Breakdown, Anaemia, Debility. Sleeplessness. Nerve Pains, Hca -t Wo.knoss, Kidney and Sto- mach Disorders..Children's Weakness, Spinal and Nerve Paralysis. Brain Fag, and all run- down condition' Send 2d. to-day to Dr. Casr-cii's Co., Ltd. (418). Chester-road, Manchester, for a free sample. AIl cbcmis-ts Dr, Cas-'pll's TaVots at IOAD.. 1, Hd.. and 2s. 9d.. the 2r. 0d. size being the most ec-onenrea].

BARRY CENTRAL BOWLING CLUB

BARRY CENTRAL BOWLING CLUB. UAXDSOME TROPHIES OFFERED FOR COMPETITION. r i" j At a special general mating cf the Barrv Central Bowling Club, hold on Thursday i even i ng last. at the 1,??ld <)ii Tliur,day evening last, at the Y.M.C.A. Institute. Mr. F O'DonnelI presided, and there wa a good attendances A resolution was moved bv Mr. G. Clemett that in future officers of the Club be elected in the spring, instead of in the I autumn preceding the ).owling season. This, he felt, would encourage a sense of loyalty on the part of coin mittee.—Mr. H. Peach seconded, and it was carried unanimously. Mr. J. Lloyd Jones having resigned the presidency, it was resolved that Dr. P. J. 0\!>onneli be president of the Club for the ensuing year. Mr. T. Philipps was elected member of the general commnttee. Mr. G. Clemett on the watch committee, and Mr W. H. Crane- vice-captain. 4 The delegates to the Welsh Bowling Asso- elation at Cardiff (Messrs. J. Lloyd Jones, | F. O Ponnell, and H. Peach) reported that it had 1 >een dt-oldc-d to abolish league matches in connection with the Association. They, as delegates, had voted against the proposi- tion, but without success. Discussion took place on the various club competitions. Mr. T. H. Leat announced that the Co- operative Society had decoded to offer a cup, value ten guineas, for competition. The Secretary 'Mr. R. Peach) also p01ntffi t. Gr(,erer lia d (,I T ci-c d i cup out that Mr. F. J. Greener had offered a cup for com petit ion between the club members, and stated that Mr. Greener would offer a. similar cup next year. On the proposition of Mr. W. Gatheridge, the thanks of the Club were passed to the donors. The question of the competitions was left to the general committee, with a recommen- dation that the committee: arrange for a knock-out competition. The question of the entertainment of the visiting teams was considered, and the Secre- tary suggested that the District Council be again urged to provide a convenience on the ground.—Mr. J. Dyer proposed that the tea.s and meetings he again held at. the Y.M.C.A. Institute. Mr. G. Clemett se- conded, and it was carried. Messrs. J. Dyer. W. H. Crane, and H. Peach were ap- pointed a committee to make the arrange- ments. A vote of thanks was parsed to Messrs. T. H. Leat and H. Peach for placing the request of the Club before the District Coun- cil. and a like vote was accorded Mr. F. O'Donnell for presiding.

HOW TO MAKE POULTRY PAY

HOW TO MAKE POULTRY PAY. Lloyd's" Penny Poultry Book has been published by "Lloyd's Weekly News, Lon- don 'post free l^d.), chiefly with a view to assisting the amateur poultry keeper to derive both pleasure and profit from his hobby. Tiie information is supplied by an expert with forty years' experience bellind bllll. and is absolutely reliable. The see- tions of the book on the purchase of poul- try. and how to tell the age of fowls, are in particular remarkable for their fulness* and simplieitv of explanation. Artificial and natural hatching and rearing, complete descriptions of the various breeds, the effi- il,, froiii the iiioment cient treatment of chicks from the moment of birth, servicea ble breeds, co-operative mar- keting, and the treatment of poultry diseases, are an matters which receive the fullest attention. Authoritative lists are o-iven of poultrv societies and specialist clubs in all parts of the country, and these will he of material aid to those who wish to join tui organisation where tlwy will come into contact with experts. The hook also g;i'CS trustworthy information on the keeping of ducks, geese, guinea fowls, and turkeys, and is one of the best penny poultry hooks ever put on the market.

Advertising

Ite HT ARCH ER&Cfj fl IgOUEN RETURNS] R BEtlSTEBEB LJjj IB Facsimile oj One-Ounce Packet Archerl's I Golden Returns < fi. FatfteUaB "lot P11K> T I I Do at* 8rm, *ir»