Collection Title: Barry Dock news

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
7 articles on this page
Advertising

FOR Printing, OF EVERY DESCRIPTION TRY THE 'Barry Dock News,' HOLTON ROAD, BARRY DOCK. THE 'Barry Dock News' IS PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY.. PRICE ONE PENNY l THE Barry Dock News' IS ON THE LIST FOR # PARLIAMENTARY ADVERTISEMENTS. ••

Copyright in US America All Rights Reserved LADY MARGARETS VOW

[Copyright in U.S. America, All Rights Reserved.] LADY MARGARET'S VOW BY BLANCHE EARDLEY, Author of "A Bid for a Bride," Mri. Maxweli't Silence," ice. I SYNOPSIS I J. u ELLIOTT, a rich gentleman farmer, is secrctly engaged to Olivia Casaella. Hi urges her to end the secrecy by all immediate marriage, but the girl, afraid of losing by this action her share of the fortune of her mint, Lady Margaret Hogarth, who has forbidden any engagement, declines Ret iniiig home from the meeting with her lover she encounters Luke Sladen, Lady Margaret's secretary, who is I in love with her, and confirms the fact that in the event of her marriage to Elliott she will be unable to touch a penny of her aunt's money. The same day she is surprised by hearing from Lady Margaret that the latter has chosen a husband for her, no other than Sladen himself. If she refuses, the fortune is to be divided between Sladen and her younger sister, Virgin a. I>ady Margaret then decides suddenly on a visit to London, and immediately she has gone Olivia tinds her new will, made on the previous day. Startling news then arrives, for Lady Margaret has been found murdered near the summer-house in the woods. Olivia bears the shock of the crime stoically, but shows signs that she has begun to fear Sladen. Margaret's lawyer then announces that by a will made seven years previously Olivia and her sister Virginia take between them the great fortune left by their aunt. He, how- ever, suspects the existence of a much more recent document, and the Secretary then discloses that a new will had been prepared and signed on the day before Lady Margaret's visit to London 'J he document, however, is missing from the deceased's despatch-box. The police fail to discover the perpetrator of the crime, and at last there arrives on the •cene Detective Inspector Thaw, of Scotland Yard. Thaw has come to stay at Eppstone until the mystery is solved, but he can get no other facts from the sisters than those disclosed by Olivia at the inquest. Assuming command of the house, Olivia dismisses the secretary and her maid, Jordan, and each encounters the other later in the wood near the scene of the murder. Jordan proposes that she and Sladen unite forces against Olivia. She has discovered in the bracken the dagger by which her ladyship was killed, and declares that the fellow to t: e weapon is lying in a drawer in MiM Olivia's room. Meanwhile Virginia receives a letter from her lover, Wilfrid Lyttleton, announcing his arrival shortly, bringing a couple of blcodhounds to track the mis- creant. The news causes consternation to the sisters, who, deathly pals, stare at each other with a question they dare not voice. I CHAPTER IX. I f THE MAN WITH THE HOUNDS. I On the platform at Charing-cross from which the three-twenty train for Eppstone left, considerable interest was shown by the passengers scattered about in a young man leading two enormous bloodhounds on chains. The man was interesting in himself-big, C'1.an of limb, and broad in the shoulders; I his face was strong, and compelled a certain admiration from those who possessed a know- ledge of the human countenance. He was tuterlv unconscious of the sensation that he and his hounds created, and the man with hhn, who was known to the many officials, was qually indifferent to the awed glances that fell on him. "It's a pity," he was saying, "that the local force did not employ the hounds weeks ago." The young man nodded. "Yes, they should have been on the scene before people began to cross the trail and de- stroy the scent. I know they are too late for any real gocd but, as it has not rained much since the murder, there may be a chance of getting a new clue through them. I can't think why they were not employed imme- diately." "You see, Lyttletou," the man said apolo- gc-tically, "it. iaket; country people some time to believe in the bloodhound a a a 'detective.' I urged it from the first, but, you know, they did not call the Yard in for some days. These local country chaps work very well, and they know the country and secret places better than we do. but they laek our know- lodge of the habits of criminals." "I shall be putting up at the inn at Epp- stone," Wilfrid Lyttleton said presently, "but I am dining to-night at TItc Mount with the Mioses Casieila." The detective shot a quick glance at him. "Then you are a friend of the family?" he said. Lyttleton nodded. "In a sense; though I am going there fur the first time," liE said simply. "I am en- gaged to the younger Miss Ca.dla." Detective Inspector Thaw was silent. lie had known Wilfrid LyrtK'ioii, the rising voung journalist. for many vcar.i, and they had often met in circumstances that had been of mutual advantage. The journalist had col- lected "copy" from the detective's vast mental storeroom, and the Scotland Yard man had taken many a useful hint from the journalist. "Then you haven't met the elder Miss Ca-sella? Lyttleton adjusted one of the collars round a hound's neck. "No, not vet. But I am anxious to meet Iter. I hear she is very beautiful, in a dark, stormy way." The detective smiled. Stormy? Well. yes, that might describe her," he said slowly. "She looks much older than her sister, and is a much stronger cha- racter. Do they know that you are bringing down the hounds to help in the case?" "I wrote Miss Virginia so," Lyttleton answered. She hae probably told her sister. The detective did not roply. He was won- dering curiously how Olivia Cassell.. had i ak-et) the news that bloodhouaids would be called in to help unravel the mystery of her aunt's death. Would she be glad or sorry? Would she welcome her sister's lover with pleasure, or otherwise? In the meantime Wilfrid Lyttleton bad turned aaide to greet a fashionably-dressed lady, and the detective strolled on down the platform. "What are you doing here, Mr. Lyttleton? And why are you dragging those enormous creatures about with you?" Wilfrid's new friend cried in a high, laughing voice. "You look like the manager of a'circus." He smiled. "I wish I were. Lady Scott. Unfortu- nately I am still an obscure journalist, and incidentally the owner of a couple of blood- hounds that I have trained to track crimi- > rtala." Lady Scott shuddered prettilv. She did everything prettily; she was one of those women who study every phase and attitude of which woman is mistress, and tjien use them for the general enslavement of their admirers. She was in appearance petite and vivacious, with as abundance of carel^dy-arranged curia of an auburn tint, which bore evidence of the hair specialist's care. Her complexion was tastefully tinted, and only in her eyes, small, wicked, and green, did she betray her small, w i age. Her figure was wonderful, lithe and plump, though she had so far escaped the little bit of loose skin that appears under a full chin after a certain age, and the wrinkles beside the ears still were conspicuous by their absence. Wilfrid Lyttleton had been a great friend of her late husband, Sir David Scott, and though his vivacious widow would not have been adverse to being the wife of the attractive but poof journalist, he had con- trived tactfully to remaic a friend, while avoiding the dangers of flirtation. "But why are you training criminal dogs?" she said plaintively. "If you took up sea-lions now, or even monkeys, you might go on the stage with them, but these fierce-looking creatures, must be a fearful bother. He smiled tolerantly. "I am taking them to-day to the scene of that dastardly Drutal murder of that poor old sotd, Lady Margaret Hogarth poor he began. Lady Scott raised her hand excitedly. "Not to The. Mount at -Fppatons r, How strange!" she exclaimed. "I am just going to join her nieces as chaperon." Wilfrid looked at her with interest. t "I did not know you knew them," he Mid. ]l i'1\ø world io-Ter.T auull after til, that you have known th-em all this time, and only just, mentioned them to me." "I don't scv that it is so very strange," retorted. "I knew Lady Margaret through my husband, and only saw Olivia CaescJIa once, but I thought she ond her sister might liko me to act as chaperon for a while until they can get away. I can hardly be said to be a great friend though, only Lady Mar- garet was a friend of poor David when they were younger." Then she added pertly, "Iay I inquire which of the Misses Cassella it is in whom you are interested, Mr. Lyttle- ton? Wilfrid flushed. "I am engaged to the younger," he blurted out simply. "Oh!" And for a moment the email green eyes ceased to sparkle and looked like 8tag nant pools. Only for a moment though. A second later she had asked Wilfrid to travel with her, if he had not already made other arrangements. "Choot-te a first-class smoker," she said gaily. "I don't object to being social and having a cigarette if we are alone, only please don't bring those awful looking hounds into the carriage. I should be afraid of being eaten by them." "There is no fear of that, he answered. "Pelioxi and Ossa are travelling de luxe in a van to themselves." A few moments later they started, Wil- frid and Lady Scott, in a first-class "smoker," and her ladyship's maid in a second "ladies only," while Detective-inspec- tor Thaw travelled in a modest third. When they arrived at Eppstone, Wilfrid put Lady Scott and her belongings into the carriage that had been sent to meet her from The Mount, and he and the detective, with the hounds, proceeded to the village inn.'7 ier "You are coming to dinner, of course, t.er ladyship cried, leaning out of the carriage window. Yes, please tell Miss Cassella that I shall be paying my respects as soon aa I can," he said. Wilfrid went on to the inn in the company of the detective, and after seeing to the com- fort of the animals, he had tea, and- then dressed and set out on foot to pay his first call at The Mount. In spite of his natural eagerness to see the girl who had won his heart at the little Cornish village in the summer, he was curious to see her sister, whom gossip credited with such a strange character and weird beauty. He was shown into the drawing-room, and was conscious that a little knot of people broke up, and Virginia's graceful figure came towards him.. "Olivia," she said, "this is Mr. Lyttleton My sister Olivia." The simple introduction over, Wilfrid looked at the face of the girl—no, the woman-wlio stood chatting so easily and lightly to him. He saw a pale, imperious face crowned by shining braids of dark hair and large, unfathomable, golden brown e^es that accentuated the broad, creamy brow, looked fearlessly into his own. "What a magnificent creature! he thought. Then his eyes strayed to Virginia's frail loveliness, and he was glad that it was she who had won his heart. "This flashing- eyed tragedy queen would want a man always at her feet," he thought, "but Virginia would nestie close to Ids heart and love him." Then Olivia introduced him to a tall, hand. some man, whom he instantly liked with that unreasoning instinct that breaks down con- vention, and as lie noticed the quick glance that flashed from his young hostess to the man, he guessed that she had found the one soul in all the world who could influence her with love. "Lady Scott tells us she travelled down with you from town, Mr. Lyttlc-ton," Olivia said, as a moment later Sir David Scott's piquant widow swept into the room, radiant in black and silver, with a black aigrette in her ruddy curls. Yes," Wilfrid answered siiiilinglv. "Lady Seoti was kind enough to take pity on my loneliness." "And where are those awful animals? her lad whip retorted gaily. "You did not bring thr'-ii with you, did you?" Olivia had turned away, but Wilfrid noticed how white Virginia's face had grown, I\fld he inwai'diy cursed' his friend's widow for a tactless, blundering idiot. He made some hiirti'. d remark, and then saw with relief that the entrance of a tall, thin man switched La Seott" attention away from him. I I e (iren V ugiiiin on to one side, his strong, clever face softening at the sight of tIk havoc that a tragedy had made in her girlish heauty. He had fallen in love with her light gaiety and laughing blue eyes, but. no v. though she was still lovely, the light- limited gaiety had vanished, and a shadow replaced the laughter in her eyes. "When can I see you alone? he said in a Iov> voice. "After dinner, in the den upstairs," she ba id in the same tone. "1 have such a lot to lell V\HI." "And I you," he answered with a flash of his kindly eyes. "I have been hungering for a sight of you since We sad good-bye." Virginia smiled, but in spite of the flu.Oj that her lovers presence brought to h'M' pale face, Ihe keen, worldly eyes of the journsdist saw that she was acting a part, that, notwithstanding her pleasure at seeing him. she was terribly frightened of some- thing, and the swift glances she gave alter- nately to either her sister or the man whom he knew as "Mr. Sladen," made him ponder as to the cause of those timid, fawn-like movements. In the meantime Lady Scott was enjoying herself hugely. She h*d duly sympathised with Lady Margaret's nieces, and murmured pretty speeches about how "horrified she had been fit the awful tragedy," and then. meet- ing only courteous civility from Olivia and j siience from Virginia, she had brightened up at the presence of Lady Margaret's late secretary, who in evening dress looked dis- tmguished and interesting. She had been bitterly chagrined at the news that both Olivia and Virginia were engaged, and Jim Elliott's handsome, frank face had at first particularly captivated her imagination. But she accepted defeat with outward graceful re- signation, and flirted with the secretary. After dinner Virginia slipped away to the don where she and Olivia had spent so many h:tppy daYN away from their aunt's grim pre- sencc, and it was there that her lover sooa found her. He olcfled the door and drew her into hit arms, and, raining her face to his, he'kiSseJ her tenderly. "Sweetheart, at last I can hold you in my arms and tell you again how I love you, my little Virginia!" The girl clung to him silently, "Take me away from here,Wilfrid," she cried. "I hate it I hate everything—I am frightened of everything!" "I understand, darling," he murmured. "We will get married as soon as we can, and I will take you anywhere you like." Virginia raised her head and looked at him with tearful eyes. "Oh, how stupid I am!" she exclaimed. "We cannot njarry—-not for a long time." "Why not? he said gravely. "You still love me, dead" "You know I do," she murmured. "But I can't marry anyone until this awful mystery is cleared up." "Then, darling, answered, "I shall do my best to help you and your sioter to have it cleared up. That is why I brought my two bloodhounds down to see if they are too late io pick up a sc-ent. x Ah Virginia gave a little cry and fell back, looking at him with wide 'frightened eyes. "Not that way," she said quickly. "I am terribly afraid of those bloodhounds, Wilfrid. Please, please send them away." He looked at her in amazement. "Send thorn away! What do you meap, darling?" She flushed hotly, I "f can't explain. I don't know what you must think, only I-with you would take thoM f awful hounds away-for my sake, Wilfrid, be- cause the idea of their being here makes me feel dreadful!" As he looked at her he was struck again by the almost uncanny expression of her face, and an awful feeling seized him that thoro was something more than hysterical nervous- ness in her manner. It was the morbid terror of one possessed by an awful fear. He put his hands on her shoulders and looked into her face. "What do you mean?" he said quietly. uIIJ there any reason why my hounds should not help to find the murderer of your aunt? Again her face was flooded by a sudden gleam of colour. "I—I she began. A movement at the door disturbed them. They paused as Olivia and Jim Elliott came forward. Olivia's face was radiant with youth and courage. By comparison with her, Virginia looked old. Mr. Lyttleton," Olivia said, comin (or- I-er -,vl:ite hand on her sister s arm, "I can see .that you and Virginia l ave been talking about our sorrow. It seema that we must always live in its shadow." You cro right, Miss Cassella," he said pvr.v.ly. "But I mule, stand that Virginia ')' not care about my hounds being brought into the ee-fi. It places me in an awkward predicament. Of couree, I don't want to do a: thill; that either yon or Vir- fif.ux, and, on the other hand, I shall be in an invidious position towards the police*" Olivia's hand pressed more firmly on her s'.scer's arm, and the keen eye of the jour- n",]Lt faw that the pressure cf b?-Y dchcate ihurer wrought a change in her voungev i8- in her votiri g i??r Virginia is unstrung and not herself," BIle said quietly. "Please. Ir. Lyttleton, take your authority from me. By „ means use your hounds, and if they fan help fathom the mystery of our aunt's death, you will do us a gr-ii: service. He bowed gravely. "I will do my best, Miss Cassella," he said, "and if your aunt's assassin is still in this locality you may depend on it that my hounds will find him, or at least discover a clue." As he spoke there was a short, quick gasp from the doorway, and, turning, they saw Luke Sladen and Lady Scott standing there, and the late secretary's eyes were staring fixedly at Olivia Cassella. I CHAPTER X. I THE TRAIL OF THE BLOODHOUND. The following day was one of intn3e ¡ute-II rest to the inhabitants of the village of Epp- slone. Accompanied by Detective Thaw and the local Superintendent of Police, as well as Jim Elliott, Wilfrid Lyttlcton brought his two famous hounds to the scene of Lady Margaret's murder. The faces of the four men wore a grave intent look as the hounds, after sniffing the ground, began to lead off into the heart of the woods, Thaw holding one leash and Wilfrid the other, and Jim and I the Superintendent following closely on their heels. It was a long ramming way they took, I and when their first venture ended in an aim- less' full stop on the high road, the men looked at each other with disappointed eyes. "All that for nothing the Superinten- dent said with a shrug of his shoulders. "Let's take them back again," Jim sug- gested. "Very well," Wilfrid said, "only I don't in the least expect that they will succeed. They have not had a fair chance of getting on to a fresh trail." Men and hounds returned to the spot where Lady Margaret had met her mysterious end. Once more started, the hounds took the same route with their noses sniffing the ground and occasionally giving "lip" as they raced through the densely-wooded country, drag- ging their hot and tired party behind them. At last they showed an inclination to change their course, and- quickened their pace to a fast run. Presently they came in sight of the house, and the faces of the men who followed grew tense with excitement. What would the hounds discover in the home of the mur- dered woman? Would they actually lead them to the guilty person, or was the trail they were foHowing merely one of the many crossed by the police and the villagers? Wilfrid Lyttleton's lips grew set with sup- pressed excitement. The conversation he had had with Virginia the night before came back to him, garbed in ugly meaning. He had tried to laugh her out of her hysterical fear of the hounds, and even when Olivia had done the same he could not shake off the feel- ing of uneasineas that Virginia's words had given him, and now, as they drew nearer to the house, with each stride of the hounds, a deadly fear seized him, and a sensation of physical sicknes,4 made him tremble and stag- ger. "Done up?" Jim said, as he caught him up breathlessly. Wilfrid nodded. "Yes, Ossa is straining my arms off," he gasped. Jim looked ahead and saw that the hound the Superintendent was holding in had turned up a path that led round to the stables, and he and Wilfrid were practically alone for a moment. "Let me take him for you," he said. Wilfrid shook his head. "No, thanks. If they finish near the stables we shall be there in a few seconds." As he spoke the hound pulled up suddenly, and brancning off into a part of the garden called The Wilderness, stopped his quest at the foot of an ivy-covered stump of a tree and stood before it, his tongue lolling over his huge pendulous lips. The two men looked at each other blankly. "That's odd," Jim said with a half laugh. "There must have been a broken trail some- where, for the other hound has gone round to the stable." "I'm afraid it's a failure," Wilfrid said slowly, as he mopped his face with his hand- kerchief. "The ground has been trodden by so many people since, and the heavy rains have added to the difficulty. Let us go and see what Thaw and the other chap are doing with Pelion." When they reached the back 'of the house they found a surprise waiting for them. On a step leading to the French windows of a room overlooking the courtyard and servants' hall were Detective Thaw and the local Superintendent, and between them they sup- ported the insensible body of Lady Scott! Olivia, whom they had not noticed before, came to meet them and greeted Wilfrid courteously, then looked at Jim. "I was showing Lady Scott the stables, when the hound came suddenly round t.tio corner and dashed into us, and poor Lady Scott fainted, but she is coming round now, I think." They L went up the wide stone steps, and found Lady Scott, a smart little figure in a dark' blue coat and skirt, struggling to regain consciousness. She opened her babyish, shining eyes, and the colour fluttered to her pale cheeks. "I am so aorry for being such a stupid little thing." she a aid, with a soft laugh, "but it's my old heart; it can't stand being startled, and that dreadfully. handsome creature of a hound knocked me off my feet, didn't it, Olivia? Olivia nodded. ?Yea; I was quite startled to see you col- lapse so suddenly." "I hope you have had a 4cceae with your lap"sI e ho' r Lady Scott went on, as she sipped laaguidly the cold water that a servant had brought out to her. "We may have had, madam, had it not been for your untimely accident," the Super-, intendent said crossly. "Oh, have I really done any harat" aha houn plaintively. "I can't help it if your hounds knock me down coming round cor- ners^ can IT 1 think I ought to complain." "You h?T? certainly done no harm, madam," the Superintendent said slowly, "and I am afraid, apart from your regrattabre4 •ccidegt, tfcat the bouQdg fchiered nothing of any importance. What do you say. Mr. Lyttletont" 11 1 agree with you," Wilfrid replied shortly. "It has been a waste of time. But the poor brutes didn't have a chance. I will send them back to town to-morrow." Lady Scott said nothing, but to Detective Thaw; who had been looking at her in cour- teous silence, it seemed that she sighed gently, and that her eyes grew brighter. "I am glad the hounds are going back to London," she said brightly, "but sorry you have not found them of much value." As they went back to the village together the Superintendent said to Thaw "I coneider the whole business to-day haa been a waste of time, don't you? The detective was silent a moment, then he replied quietly "Nothing that one gives one's whole mind to is entirely a waste of time. Perhaps the morning may be more profitable than we think. In the meantime Wilfrid Lyttleton had stayed a few moments chatting to Lady Scott and Olivia. Jim had received an invitation to lunch which he had refused, and the hound gave him a good excuse to go away. He found himself back in The Wilderness near the ivy- covered stump where the hound Ossa had stopped before. He leashed the two animals to a tree, and then, going down on his hands and knees, he made a thorough search of every hidden corner and nook. At last, as his fingers found a hollow place beneath the covering of ivy, they came in contact with something that was neither ivy nor broken mess. He drew it out slowly, and saw that it was a handkerchief with a big monogram, in which the letters "V.C." were cunmngly in- "i terwoven. It was a tiny fragment of lace and canionc, covered with dirt and green shine, and felt very bulky. The corners of two sides were tied into a knot, and when he un- fastened it he found two rings inside. He 1 examined them closely, then uttered a gasp cF amazement. They were two of the missing rings Lady | Margaret had been wearing! (To be Continued.)

Advertising

I LLOYDS BANK LIMITED. Head Office: 71, LOMBARD STREET, E.C. Capital Subscribed S31,304,200 Capital Paid up 5,008,672 Reserve Fund 3,600,009 Deposits, &c. 118,173,859 Advances, &c. 59,439,647 +- OVER 880 OFFICES IN ENGLAND AND WALES. French Auxiliary: LLOYDS BANK (FRANCE) LIMITED. Offices In PARIS, BORDEAUX, BIARRITZ & HAVRE.

I BARRY RECHABITES IN OFFICE j

BARRY RECHABITES IN OFFICE. The 33rd annual meeting of the Car- i diff District (No. 58) Independent Order of Rec-habites was held at Cardiff on Saturday last, Bro. W. T. Absalom, D.C.R., presiding. The membership of the voluntary section was reported as 1,684 adults, and 2,059 juveniles, a total of 3,743. while the funds amounted to £ 1J ,80ii. Thoro were also 1,840 State members. A sum of 10s. 6d. was voted to the Barry Rand of Hope Union. The District Secretary announced that 150 members were serv- i ing with the colours, but probably there were many more. The officers eleded for 1915 included Bro. J. W. Lennox (Barry) D.C.R.; Bro. Gibbs (Barry), j D.G. Bros. J. A. Jenkins, R. Bird, and Bro. E. J. Curtis (Barry) district auditor. Bro. J. W. Lennox was also nominated to represent the district at the High Moveable Conference at Brad- ford in August. v Bro. J. W. Lennox is to be congratu- lated upon his election as district chief ruler, an onice which his qualifications j will enable him to fill with marked ability.

BRITAIN AND THE WAR I

BRITAIN AND THE WAR. I Why is the red blood flowing ? .1 Why do our brethren fight ? Why has Britain, her proud heart glowing, Joined in the war against might? Ah 'tis a sad, sad story. Of the war that is raning now, Of the battlefield's awful gory, Where -the conquered to the foe must bow. 'Tia a tyrant's mad ambition, That has caused the world's great woe That has been followed in quick pncceseion, By the destruction of hamlet and home. The murder of motherly women, And also of innocents small Who unconscious of approaching danger, Were slaughtered in village and hall. Thousands of our dear brothers, Have fought by the Belgian's fide Have uphold the Briton's honour, For their country they lived and died. Our brave Jack Tars we must not forget, Hia duty is his watchword; -He'll rid the seas of Germans yet, And reduce their vessels to matchwood. Come rally young man to the standard, Go now and do your duty Your fellows are fightiog across the scan, For England, Home, and Beauty. Your King and Country need you, Will you shrink back from their call? Ob, -and ibaj God 11 peed you, And blets you if i« the Service yon fall. Lit Y MABEL RICHARDS. 25, KINDgrAND Crescent, 124 Years. Babky Dock.

IHAnBY MEDICAL OFFICERS ANNUAL REPORT

I HAnBY MEDICAL OFFICER'S ANNUAL REPORT. INTERESTING RECORD OF THE. TOWN'S HEALTH. WARNING TO PARENTS. The twenty-sixth annual report of Dr. G. Neale, J.P.. the Barry medical officer of health, is published this week, and is an interesting record of the general health conditions of the town dining the past twelve months. Dealing with infectious and other diseases, Dr. Noaie indicatea that 205 cases of diphtheria were notified dur- ing the year, an increase of 25 com- pared with those in 1913. He ad- mitted some difficulty in attributing the canse, but in several instances di ph theria had been discovered in the public schools, and contact cases traced The disease was prevalent throughout the country, whilst, no doubt, the. atmospheric conditions were in some measure responsible for the large number of cases. There was, too, a prevalence of soar let fever, 295 cases being notified. "Parents," the report adds, have not yet realised, in spite of the advance of sanitary know- ledge, the importance of paving strict attention, to the detection and isolation of the disease. In many instances cases were visited when the patient had reached the peeling of the dis- ease. and further cases were discovered in which no medical practitioner had been consulted," There had been 112 notifications of tuberculosis, a decrease of four com- pared with the previous twelve months. A large number of tuberculosis patients were now attending the local Accident and Surgical Hospital fior consultation with Dr. Gilchrist, the tuberculous physician of the King Ed- ward VII. Memorial As?.La.tion, and in future all contacts, or children of tuberculosis parents, will be noted with a view to having them examined, so that, if the disease is prevalent, it shall be detected and treated in its earlv stages. Thirty-one deaths from the disease were recorded in 1914. Whooping cough was very prevalent- during the year, and twelve deaths re- sulted. The disease, t.he report states, is treated somewhat lightly by parent-s. and little effort is made to prevent other children of the family being affected. From measles, of which there was a prevalence, five deaths had resulted, ,t. 'L l-is had resulted.' all the children being under five vears of age. At the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Coloot-road the accommodation had been greatly taxed, 268 patients suf- fering from diphtheria, smrlefc fever, and enteric fever. The accommoda- tion, in fact, after the experience of two years' working, was found to be insuf- ficient, and the Council 'had decided to erect additional wards and otiher build- ings at a cost of The Accident Hospital had proved of much value, for. apart from the recep- tion of accident cases, operations were performed on school children for ade- noids, enlarged tonsils, ear disc,harge.s) and X-Ray treatment for ringwomn given. Three hundred and twentv- three accidents and surgical ca^es were treated, and 12(! operations in connection with the School Clinic per- formed during 1914. Dr. Neale further points but that during the pa.st three years houses for the wo j-king classes had become scarce,* and he refers to the action of the Council in erecting twenty-four dwell- ing's to meet the shortage. Plans had also been prepared for more houses at a lower rental than those which were now built., and when these were c hnpieied, a long-felt want will have been met. There was no doubt that at ?)R present time overcrowding existed amo!:?;t the poorer classes. In 1001 there were 1,404 vacant houses in the (Utrict. whilst n^w there were only 62 of all classes, including shops. The mumber of births registered dur- ing the year was 895, of which 437 we -e males, and 458 females,, an in- crease of 31 compared with the pre- vious year. During the past few years the birth-rate had gradually decreased throughout the country. In the Barry district, in 1892, it was a.s hi as 53.6 per 1,000. There were 401 deaths in 1914, 217 males and 184 females, the death rate, 11.5, being a decrease of 2.0 compared with the previous vears. The infantile death rate Was equal to 2.56.

CONTRARY MARY AT CADOXTON

CONTRARY MARY AT CADOXTON. She is the worst character in the district, remarked Supt. D. Morris at Penarth Police Court on Wednesdiav last, in a case in which Mary Jane Martin, a Oadoxton woman, was charged with being drunk and disor- derly. She made her 137th appear- ance, and in spite of her appeal for another chance," she was sent to pri- son for a month. Elizabeth W.heekcr, another Cadox- ton woman, was fined -tO, for being drunk and disorderly. She had been before tM Eteu&k ? iuaes previously.