Collection Title: Barry Dock news

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
14 articles on this page
I INDUCTION OF WELSHI MINISTER AT BARRY DOCKS I

INDUCTION OF WELSH MINISTER AT BARRY DOCKS. Tho induction services of the Kov. D. ( Morgan,, lato of Port Talbot. as pastor /vf .Salem Weistfi Bapti sit. Church. Ba rry Docks, were held on Wednesday week I a sit mnder anosi; favoura-ble circ-uni- otances. A sorvico of welconio was hckl in the ifternoon under tho presidency of the Rev. Morrw Isaac, Siloam, Cardiff. Tho Chairman explained that the Rev. Owen Joires, of Ty du. tho former pas- tor of the Church, was unable to be present to preside. He also made con- ra tula k-ry •remarks upon the Union, whilo u humorous word now and again from. him added to the interest of the meeting. Letters were read by the Secretary of tho Church, expressing regret a-t their unavoidable absence, and offering tijieir gouJ wishes, frmiii the Revs. Ben Evans, W. Ingli Ja-mes, T. Richards fLlarutwit VaT'dre), J. Oii-fel JenkiT-ts iPenanth >. I)." I-ilwyn. Richards (Peai- clawddi, W. Richards (Pontrhydyfen,), Charles Da vies (Cardiff), Principal Edwards (Cardiff), n. G. Williams (Cwmavon). Messrs. D. Arthen. Evans. Taliesin Rees (Port Talbot), D. J. Evans (Carmarthen), 1. W. Edwards (Rhyunm-y), Rev. Herbert Jones, Mrs. Richard Evans, and Miss L. Mizen (Port Talbot). The Secretary spoke emphasising the uniOinimity and enthusiasm of the call. A hearty welcome was given to the rLew minister on behalf of the Barry 'Free Church Council by the Revs. Christ- inas Lewis. B.A.. and J. Mydyr Evans. The Rev. Howell Da vies, B.Sc., also addressed the meeting on leihaM of the Welsh Sunday School Union and the Cymrod<.rdon Society. Mr. T. Davies, York 8torets, spoke on behalf of Büt.h- esda Church, and Mr. D. J. Miartin on behalf of Calfaria.. A .strong contin- gent of Mr. Morgan's fmends came up from Port Talbot to show their respect for him. and the following bore excel- lent testimony to Mr. Morgan's work and influence in that towil:Alr. J. Bedford, Mr. J. J. Williams, Mr. W. Rees Lewis, ;amd Mr. Pritchard Wil- liams. One of those bretihren, on be- half of the Sunday School at Port Tal- hot. presented « Misis Young. )[1". Mor- gan's housekeeper, with a beautiful iisiibrella. as a mark of respect for her faithful labours as a teacher in the Sunday School. This was in addition to the presentations already Jllade at the farewell meeting at Port TalbQt, High tet>time

RIFLE SHOOTING

RIFLE SHOOTING. COrXTY POLICE DEFEATED BY I THE SPECIALS. A shooting match took place on Fri- day evening last on the range at the Central Police Station, Barry Docks, between the Barry and the Special Police. The latter won iby" 53. The highest score for the police was made by Inspector G. Griffiths, whilst W. B. Vickory was top for the specials. The next match will take" place on Satur- day, July 10th, at 2.30 p.m.

Advertising

Paralyseël Baby j Complete Care of Infantile Paralysis by Dr. CasselFs Tablets. Mrs. Anderson, 12. Rippenden-at., Byker Bank, Ncwcastle-on- i jr Tyne, says: My baby was only a. few weeks ?? ?? '? ?3???L old when he began to MBBh lose power, first of 1û8 ??S f?\ ? ilM toee power, tbea ot hia ???L ?s ??!?H arms and tben of his tmsSBL » l. I was told it waa XgffiggM infantile paralysis, and that it would be 1 t v years before he could get over it Ordinary v k,, A/* nndwJers,onnn { medicine did no good. f and baby got more helpless daily. He got quite thin, too. and cried a. lot. At last, I thought I would try Dr. CaeeeU'e Tablets. Baby was juat five months old then, and quite helpless. After a. few dosee he seemed better. and as I con- tinued giving the Tablets, power gradually returned to his little limbs, and he regained all be had loet in weight, and more. Now at a year old he is a bonny little boy. bright, active, and full of life." Dr.Cassells e Tablets. Dr. OunD't T?b?ets Me a genuine *nd twled romAdY il ?UO M"?o of nerve or bodily weaknew nn cM young. Compounded ot nerve-nutrients and tank* of tndispatsUr proTed efficacy, they are the reoogonea modern bome treatment tor NERVOUS BREAKDOWN KIDNEY DISEASE NERVE PARALYSIS INDISESTION SPINAL PARALYSIS STOMACH DISORDER INFANTILE PARALYSIS MAL-NIITRITION NEURASTHENIA WAmN8 DISEASES NERVOUS DEBILITY ? PALPITATION SLEEPLEMMEM ,3; VITAL EXHAUSTION ANEMIA PREMATURE DECAY Specially valuable for Nursing Mothers, and during the Critical Perwdc of Life. Ohemuto and storm m -U Paru Of the worl& mU Dr. o.en'. TtM?te. Prw.: 10l4d., 1/1* £ 

I GERMANS USE SILENT BOMBS I

I [GERMANS USE SILENT BOMBS. BARRY SOLDIERS GRAPHIC LETTER. Private Cornelius Lyons, of the R. F. Company, 1st Scots Guards, formerly a. member of the Glamorgan Constabu- lary. at Barry, has returned to the Front after a long spell at home wounded. Private Lyons, who went to France with the British Expeditionary Force in August, has written a long letter to Mr. T. H. Hill, Windsor Hotel, Barry Docks, in which he thanks Mr. Hill for cigarettes sent out. "I am just having a few hours' rest- says Private Lyons. "This place is 'hell itself.' The shells are continually flying about. The driver of the cart whicli conveyed your parcel to us had a 'narrow shave,' a. shell bursting over the cart. The horses were killed, but the driver got away with a cut finger, caused by fall- ing.Very fqrtunate. The 'Germs' here arc using what we call 'silent bombs.' They don't make a noise when in the air like the other projectiles, but they are very effective, and are fired by something like a machine gun. The other day we came across one of the German mines. We immediately blew it up. A few hours later, the Huns blew up another. I suppose they thought we had discovered that also. When they blew up this, they 'blew up' some of their own men also, owing to their faulty engineering. At this place, the Prussian Guards received a taste of our fire, which they will never for- get. It was here that after several days' fierce fighting they thought the road was clear, and formed up intend- ing to march on a town close by. Then our battalion, together with others, planted themselves on the sides of the road in ambush. The Huns advanced right up, and then a terrible fire thundered out from our guns, and told a deadly tale. Very few of the Prus- sian Guards survived. This war," Private Lyons points out in addition, "i s a siege war, different from any of tho past. If-we could only.get them in the open, their end would soon come. Even now, when we have a 'bust-up' and come to close quarters with them, they throw up their arms, shouting 'English, merzi.' Of course, of vic- tory we are certain, and as the days roll by the more confident we get. People must not entertain the idea that peace should come now. We are tak- ing the chance, therefore it will take time. Private Lyons asks Mr. Hill to thank all subscribers to the cigarette fund. "There are many stories to tell," con eludes Private Lyons, "but being away from civilisation, it is difficult to ob- tain writing material. I

APPOINTMENT OF NEW COUNCILLOR

APPOINTMENT OF NEW COUNCILLOR. ST. ANDREWS PARISH COUNCIL MEETING. Mr. Ivor B. Thomas (chairman) pre- ided at a meeting of St. Andrew's Major Parish Council at the Parish Hall, Dinas Powis, on Monday evening last. The members present were Messrs. H. Naldrett, H. Barrett D. R. Morgan. R. Howell Jones, and Austin Davies. A. communication was read from Mr. T. S. Cram, a late member of the Coun- cil, thanking the members for their kindness in his recent trouble. Owing to his retirement as member of the Council, a vacancy occurred, and on the motion of Mr. Naldrett. seconded by Mr. Barrett, Mr. John Howells, Dinas Powis, was elected to fill the vacancy. The 0/ question of the purchase of a new flag for the hall was considered, and on the proposition of Mr. Barrett, seconded by Mr. Davies, it was de- cided that a new flag be procured, at a price not exceeding 25/

SATURDAYS CRICKET

SATURDAY'S CRICKET. I BARRY v. ST. ANDREW'S. Barry were defeated by St. Andrew's (Dinas Powis) at Barry Island on Saturday last, by 91 runs to 62. Scores: Barry.—W. T. Llewellyn 4, B. S. Cording 0, Sergeant Jackson 0, A. Deacon 46, W. Jennings 4, A. Osborne 1, Dr. Budge 1, F. Williams (not out) 2, Beaumont 0, Davies 0, Joslyn 0, ex- tras 4, total 62. St. Andrew's.—G. Waters 4, C. J. Waters 15, A. Lewis 3, A. H. Bristowe (not out) 2G, W. James 0, C. Rees 13, J. Hawtin 7, G. Thomas 7, L. Coles 6, W. Hawtin 0, L. Collins 3, extras 7, total 91. I SATURDAY'S FIXTURES. I BARRY v. ST. FAGANIS. j. At Barry Island; wickets pitched, 2.30 PJIll. Barrv: A. Osibome (cap- tain), R. V. Williams. W. T. Llewellyai, A. Deacon, F. Williams, Sergt. Jack- SOrh, C. J. Waters, Dr. Budge, B. Cord- ing, W. Jenninigs, and S. Beaumont.

IBOUNCING BABIES

I BOUNCING BABIES. SUCCESSFUL SHOW AT DINAS POWIS. .With the object of eiicouragiiLg mothers to rear healthy children, an Inrfa-njfc Health Club was formed at Ddnas Powis last yea-r, when it ''had a membership of twenity. In the mean- time, :howm"er, the CQub th?s m/ade rapid progress, and the membership has been more than trebled. On Wedinesday afternoon last a Baiby Show was held at The Mount. Dinas Powis, the residence of Major-General H. H. Lee, J.P., D.L., and fifty proud motihers presented their children for competition, the judges being Dr. R. Piritchard and Mrs. Oaiitillon, Cardiff. Tllie iresuk of the judging was as fol- lows — 'Class 1 (girls under twelve 'months). -1. Eleanor Gertrude Dibble; 2 Iary Elizabeth Veim 'I Class 2 (boys under tr\vd!ve tlllonths). 1 1, Joseph Clems and Nortman Starr. Class 3 (girls between one and two years).—1. Mariorie Hiissey: 2, Theresa Sutton. Olass 4 (boys between one and two years).—1, Edwaurd Williams; 2, Arthur Lamber't. Olasa 5 (children between two and four years).—1, Herbert Southcote: 2, Alina Spear. AJfter the judging, tea was served a.t the Parish Hall. General Lee pre- sided, and the prizes were distributed by Mrs. Alexander; Mrs. BTown, Mils. Bennett, Mrs. Fmsoma, and iMrs. Greeniaway also being the recipients of prizes for making the best attendances at Club meetings. Mrs. Joseph Davies admirably car- ried out the secretarial lanranigetmentls, and a vote of tthanks was proposed to General Lee for his kindness in placing The Mount at their disposal by Mr. Joseph Davies, J.P., who also tihaniked Mrs. Adexander ,-for dis.tributing the prizes, the judigeis, and all who took part in the proceedings.

TO SUPPORT HOSPITAL COTI

TO SUPPORT HOSPITAL COT. I BARRY YOUNG HELPERS' II LEAGUE GARDEN PARTY. The Banry and Cadoxton Young Helpers' League .support a cot at the Barkingsiide Village Homes, London, and the htatlf-yeailly 'box opening cere- mony and garden party were held on Wednesday week last, in the grounds of St. Osyth, Barry, the residence of CounicÜlor F-rank Murrell (the presi- dent of the League) and'Mits. Maiirrell. Mr, H. Lewis, Ponthkerry, received the boxes from, the children, and pre- sented Kathleen Grace with a badige for her splendid work in connection with the League. The stalls were well patronised, and a musicial prograim/me was provided by Mrs. C. L. Rees aind Party, Mrs. W. Evans, and Miss Jones. The proceeds of the box collections aanminted to X10.

LIST OF CONTRIBUTIONS FOR WEEK ENDED JUNE 23rd 1915

LIST OF CONTRIBUTIONS FOR WEEK ENDED JUNE 23rd, 1915. £ s. d. Previously acknowledged 2,336 16 10 Barry Railway Oomp'nny Loco. Dept. 8 18 7 Engimeer's Dept. 2 1 9 Traffic Dept. 1 7 11 Shiplpiing Dept. 1 11 7 Docks Dept. 0 7 8 Elec. Dept. 0 4 9 Stores Dept. 0 1 2 14 13 5 Proceeds of Matinee given at Theatre Royal, Barry, by the Cardiff Atmateur Dramatic Society (1st irusta-l'merut) 26 0 0 Barry Pilots licensed under Barry Pilotage Board 3 15 0 X2,381 5 3 —^

LOCAL RELIEF FUNDI

LOCAL RELIEF FUND. £ s. d. Previously acknowledged 203 3 6 Barry Railway Company Traffic Dept. 0 2 11 Stores Dept. 0 1 3 ——— o 4 Q Mr. P. ,\V. SheDlock. 0 4 0 Y,203 It 8 1 Further conitiu out ions will be grates fully (received, and may be sent to the Chairman of the Council (Mr. J. Mar- shall), or to Mr. R. A. Sprent, Na,tional I Provincial Bank, Barry Docks.

Advertising

FUN AND FANCY

FUN AND FANCY. Thomaa: "That Miss Wadleigh is rather reserved, isn't she?" Jack: "Verr much so. I reserved her for life last night. "What," asked the very young pemon, "if your idea of a dude?" "Adude, answered the observer of things, "is a young gentle- man who tries to behave in a ladylike manner. Arthur: "You don't mean to say tnere can be two opinions as to whether lotteries are moral or immoral?" Bob: "Certainly. It all depends whether you win or losel" Mrs. Meeker (at the play): "I do wish you'd pay more attention to thia Pla.y'l George; it's as good as a sermon." Mr. Meeker (dozing): "It certainly is, my dear, but the orchestra wakes me UD between acts." Jones: "Do you know, I fancy I have quite a literary bent." Friend: "All right, my boy. Keep on and you'll be worse than bent; you'll be broke." The Agent: "Then well consider that* settled." The Actor: "But—er—what about j the contract?" The Agent: "Oh, that's all right. A verbal contract'll do." The Actor: "Laddie, listen. The last time I had verbal contract I drew a verbal salary!" Mistress (engaging servant): "And remem- ber, Jane, we like to be served at table with alacrity." Jane: "Certainly, mum; and when will yer 'are it—after the soup? Officer: "I was struck very much by your ignorance in drill this afternoon. Why, oon- found it, you don't even know where your front is!" Recruit: "Yes, I do, sir. It's gone to the wash with my shirt." The Actor Man (modestly): "As a matter of fact, I could show you letters from—er— ladies in—er—almost every place in which I have appeared." The Sport (with convic- have a PlE?;nldladieg, I suppose?" tiou) "What I want," said the young man, "ia to get married and have a peaceful, quiet home." "Well," said the Farmer Corn- tassol, "sometimes it works that way, and Sometimes it's like joinin' a debatin' society." Teacher: "Now, remember that in order to become a proficient vocalist you must have patience." Miss Flipkins: "Yes; and so must my next-door neighbours." Kiiig: "How did you make your wife's I acquaintance? Bing: "I ran over her with my motor-car. The Court decreed that I should pay her three thousand pounds damages, but I thought it was cheayer to marry her." "Well, boy, what do you know? Can you write a business letter? Can you do sums?" "Please, sir," said the applicant for a job, "we didn't go in very much for those studies at our school. But I'm fine on beadwork or clay-modelling." Mrs. Nagget: "Oh, you make me tired! You're for ever trying to give the impression that you're a martyr. I suppose you want everybody to think that you suffer in silence, because Mr. Nagget: "No; I suffer in the perpetual absence of silence. A little silence occasionally would be a positive pleasure to me." Pretty Waitress: "What makes you look I so miserable, sir?" Customer: "Why, to I tell you the truth, the wife ran away last night." Pretty Waitress: "I shouldn't take on about that if I were you." Customer: "I don't; but she came back again this morn- ing." "That is the sword of my great-uncre. General Dasher," said the host, who was conductino, a guest through his gallery of relics. "He lost his arm at Waterloo." "Yes; it's a terrible place for losing things," re- sponded the guest. "I lost a bag there only last week." An Irishman had just come over from Ire- land to London to seek his fortune, when, as he was walking along one of the busy thoroughfares, he saw a bateh of policemen going on duty. "Becrra he exclaimed. "They tould me the strates of London were paved with gold, but I find they's paved with 'coppers. "Shall I have to get married wnen I grow up?" asked little Flossie one day of her mother. "Just as you please, dear," answered her mother, with a smile. "Most women do. however." "Yes, I suppose so," continued the little girl musingly; "and I think I'd better start and look out for a husband now. They say that Aunt Jane has been at it for twenty years, and hasn't caught one yet." Banks: "I don't mind the influenza itself 60 much; it's the after-effects I'm afraid of." Rivers: "The after-effect is what ails me. I'm still dodging the doctor because I owe him twenty-five shillings." Jack: "How are you going to spend the summer? Tom: "I'm going to spend it travelling from one seaside place to another, until I find a girl worth a million or two Who wants to be loved and married for her- self alone." Mrs. A.: "You say brandy is a good remedy for colic; but I don't agree with you." Mrs. B.: "What do you know about it?" Mrs. A.: "A great deal. Before I had brandy in the house my husband never had colic more than once or twice a year; but as soon as I kept a supply he had colic almost every day." Tailor: "When will you pay me that bill?" Smithkins: "Upon my soul, old chap, you remind me of my little nephew." "I do? Why?" "Because you ask questions that for the life of me I can't answer." Friend: "So your husband has been de- ceiving you, eh? Mrs. Henpeck: "Yes, the wretch! I used to give him fourpence for his bus fare every day, and I found out he's been walking to the offioe and spending the money. "I'm afraid I haven't many good argu- ments for our side of the question," said the county councillor. "No arguments!" re- • eponded his agent. "Then quote statistics. They sound wise, and everybody would rather take them for granted than try to understand them." "I hev come to tell yez, Mrs. Malone, that yer husband met with an accident." "An* what is it now?" wailed Mrs. Malone. "He was overcome by the heat, muin." "Over- come by the heat, was- he? An' how did it come by "He fell into the furnace over at happen?" fell into the furnace over at the foundry, mum." "Maria," said Mr. Billiams, "what ails this meat?" "Never mind the meat, dear," said Mrs. Billiams. "I'm more concerned to know what ails you. This is the first time for twenty-five years that you haven't been able to tell exactly what ai?ey the meat, and everything else <,» the table. Aren't yo* well to-daj, Johef"

ITEA TABLE TALK I I

I TEA TABLE TALK. I I 8ix hundred women were sxsenfed lot witchcraft in Frapoe in 1609. • a The daughters of the Duke ftafl DuIaeM of Fife are splendid swimmers. It has been a custom in the Royal family for the children to be taught to swim as soon as they are able to walk. The Duke of Fife himself taught his daughteza at Brighton, where the Fife family were wont to spend several months each year before the Princess Royal's health neoeasitated has going abroad. Jean Countess of Roxburghe, who died In 1753, aged ninety-six, had a long widow- hood of seventy-one years, but a eertais Dame Agnes Skinner, who is buried is Camberwell Church, holds the reoord for long widowhood. She died in 1499, aged one hundred and nineteen years, and suijiwed her husband for ninety-two years. e e e In the Taiping rebellion, in 1850, half a million women were engaged with the men in military operations. The leader of this rebellion was Hung-eiutsuen, who believed that he had a mission overthrow the Manchu dynasty. He made an immense number of oonverts. Having laid waste some of the best provinces in southern China, they captured Nanking in 1859. Here the women were formed into brigades; ten thousand were garrisoned within the city and the rest were compelled to do the rough work of the army—digging trenches, throwing up earthworks, and erecting batteriiee. They held the place until ISM, when the Imperial army, led by the famous English general "Chinese Gordon," finally suppressed the rebellion and retook the city. It e Lady Wantage is a most determined opponent of the extension of the suffrage to her own sex. She is the daughter and widow of men upon whom peerages were conferred, which at their deaths became extinct. From her father. Lord Overstone, Lady Wantage inherited Lockinge House, an eighteenth-century mansion overlooking the Vale of the White Horse. < e The Queen of the Belgians, like her hua. band, is a fully qualified doctor of medicine, and her labours as a sick nurse in the Belgian capital have endeared her to rich and poor alike. One of her many good works before King Albert's acoesaion was the founding of the Albert Elizabeth Dis- pensary for the consumptives of Brussels. She was often in daily attendance at her dispensary, giving personal Attention to the patients; indeed, her goodness of heart and philanthropic disposition have earned fog her the title of the people's Queen. » The most valuable pet dog in this country, is perhaps a Japanese spaniel named Togo, who belongs to Lady Samuelson, and which is worth probably a thousand pounds. Lady Gkxrdo n-Lennox has, however, a Pekingese dog for which she has refused the same sum of money- < • e The Grand Duchess of Saxe-Weimar was Princess Karola-Feodora of Saxe-Meinigen, and is a cousin of the Crown Prinoeas of Germany. She is a. clever and charming woman, and has only been married about eighteen months. The Grand Duke was a widower, his first wife, Princess Caroline of Reuss, having died in 1905, less than two years .tfter her marriage. < < e Miss Lena Ashwell has, like most members of her profession, had a good many ups and downs in the course of her stage career. More than once, she has stated, she has been on the point of abandoning in despair the effort to make her way. It was in a piece called "The Pharisee" that she made her first actual appearance in London, the theatre being the Grand at Islington. Her part was not a very "fat" one, being that of a maidservant who had precisely four words to utter-to wit, "Did you ring, .jrt < < Popular wherever she goes, the Countess of Warwick sometimes finds that her title and good looks rather interfere with her powers as a reformer. Some time ago she was addressing a large meeting on the sub- ject of medical inspection of school children, and during the course of her speech said: "I suppose you have all come to give your support to the resolution in favour of medi- cal inspection t" "Oh, no, We haven't," came a voice from the back of the room, "we've come to see you." The Duchess of Rutland is a olever sculptress, draws and paints, and her pencil portraits have become famous. ♦ # The Imperial Order of the Crown of India was instituted by Queen Victoria for ladies, British and native, on the first day of the year 1878. The badge is the Royal cypher in jewels within an oval, surmounted by an heraldic crown and attached to a bow of light blue watered ribbon, edged with white. During the reign of King Edward no new C.Ve were made, and until Lady Crewe was singled out, as the wife of a Secretary of State for India, for the honour, the order has not been bestowed since 1900. Lady Crewe is probably the only lady in the kingdom who has "Etrenne for a Christian name. It is, of course, the French word for a New Year's gift, and it was given to her from the fact that shs „ was born on January 1. < The Dowager Lady Bute wears some lovely diamonds, and is particularly fond of a costly tiara which is in the form of Hebrew letters, and means "A virtuous woman is a crown to her husband." Miss Elisabeth Braddon, the novelist, is Mrs. John Maxwell in private life, the wife of her publisher, and the mother of three promising sons, one of whom, Mr. William gi?wlli? is also a noted novelist. Miss Braddon reads German, Spanish, and Italian with equal facility. In earlier days she waa a famous horsewoman; now her leisure is devoted to her dogs, her garden- ing, and collecting old silver, curios, and bric-a-brao. Included among her collection is the little table at which Wellington wrote .his despatches. One of her hobbies is a passion for the play of "Macbeth." She will travel a long distance to see it per- formed, and could sit it out night tr-- night. Her first fiction commission was to write a serial in the style of Charles. Dickens and G. W. M. Reynolds for X10, but she actually received for it only 92 lOB. Then in 1861 Miss Braddon achieved her first popular success with "Lady Aualey s Secret," which she had dedicated to Bulwer Lytton, who had given her valuable encou- ? < 

THINGS THOUGHTFUL

THINGS THOUGHTFUL DON'T LOSE A PAWN. A long time ago, when Queen Eliiabetk was playing chess, the French Ambassador entered her room, and while watching the progress of the game, he said to her, "YouB Majesty, you have before you the game of life. You lose a pawn; it seems a small matter; but with the pawn you lose the game." The queen understood his meaninff* and saw the moral-that her success in life as a queen depended upon prompt and right action in little things; that a pawn in the game of life must not be lost; that its value in the problem of life is incalculable. The lesson taught to the queen is a good lesson for all, even in the pushful twentieth cen- tury. We can make our own sunshine and makMI our own mirth, We can add to our trouble by moping; We can make a grim graveyard of thia glad old earth By giving up loving and hoping. For it s all in the way that we look at the world- Yes, it's all in the way we view things; With sorrow or laughter our lips may be ourled, For it's all in the way that we do things. It wants not merely microscopic but tele- scopic power to know humanity in its essence; a power to discern its grandeur as well as its littleness, the infinity of its rela- tions as well as the meanness of its pur- suits. The human soul is a great deep. We must take into view the nebulous possibili- ties that are brooding and waiting there, and notice the buds and films of light that reveal themselves even in the darkest places* THE USE OF FRIENDS. In this sad world where mortals must Be almost strangers, Should we not turn to those we trust To save us from its dangers; Then whisper in my ear again, And this believe, That aught whictfi gives thy dear heart pain Makes my heart grieve. t God wills that we have sorrow here. I' And we will share it; Whisper thy sorrow in my ear That I may also bear it; If anywhere our trouble seems To find an end!, 'Tis in the fairyland of dreams. Or with a friend. ROYAL GIFTS. Some men fill the air with their strength and sweetness as the orchard's in October days fill the air with ripe fruit. Some women cling to their own house like the honeysuckle over the door, yet, like it, fiU all the region with the subtle fragrance of their goodness. How great a bounty and blessing it is so to hold the royal gifts of the soul that they shall be music to all! It would be no unworthy thing to live for, to make the power which we have within us the breath of other men's joys, to fill the atmosphere which they must stand in with a brightness which tiiey cannot create for themselves. v WHILE YET 'TIS DAY. Arise, my soul! Nor dream the hours Of life away; Arise, and do thy being's work While yet 'tis day. The doer, not the dreamer, breaks The baleful spell Whioh binds with iron hands the earth On which we dwell. 0 dreamer, wake! Your brother-man Is still a slave: And thousands go heart-crushed this day Unto the grave. From out Time's am your golden hours Flow fast away; Then, dreamer, up, and do life's work While yet 'tis day! THE VALUE OF CONVERSATION. Conversation is the most delightful method of gaining knowledge. What i* more invaluable than an accomplished com- panion, a living volume reading its own pages? What an intellectual treat it is to talk to one with whom conversing we forget all time. It is worth much to read the lessons of a philosopher, but to hear him impart them is worth much more. It is agreeable to read the narration of a tra- veller, but far more so to hear him describe what he has seen. Besides, there is the opportunity of asking questions, and skill in interrogation is one of the chief excel- lenoes of an apt converser. Lord Bacon has truly said, "He that questioneth much shall learn much, and content much: but especi- ally if he apply his questions to the skill of the person whom Iw asketh: for he ehall give them occasion to please themselves is speaking, and himself shall continually gather knowledge." A HAPPY HOME. Two birds within one nest; Two hearts within one breast. Two souls within one fair Firm league of love and prayer, Together bound for aye, together blest. An ear that waits to catch A hand upon the latch; A step that hastens its sweet rest to win; A world of care without, A world of strife shut out. A world of love shut in. THE QUEST OF THE IDEAL. It is the greatest thing in life. Matt inhabits two worlds, the world of the visible and present, and the world of his dreams. And this dichotomy of his. being keeps him in perpetual unrest. He is never in a condition where he cannot conceive a better. Mepkistophelea promises Faust en- during felicity if he is ever able to say of a given moment, "Verweile doch; du bist so schon." He is sure that he will never find that, moment. Mme. de Chantal's cry. "There is something in me that haa never been satisfied," had more than a personal reference. It is the cry of humanity. It ia reported of. R. L. Stevenson that when he heard of Matthew Arnold's death he ex- claimed, "Poor Matthew! heaven will not please him!" We could easily imaging Arnold's feeling as our own. If we carried with us to heaven the idealising faculty which now torments us, the remark would be true of us all. A firm faith is the best divinity; a good life is the best philosophy; a clear con- science the best law; temperance the best, physic. I DUTY. There are some duties which should b8 done to-day, yet they will wait as patients in the ante-room of a physician. The ante- rooms of many souls are filled with duties that have been waiting, one two hours, another a month, a third a year, and one old, grave duty, leaning on his crutebl says: "Ah, I have waited forty years for audience, and have not yet found it!" SOVIS duties come at last, like the bailiff with his warrant, or the sheriff with his writ; tner will follow you and dog your footstep un^ you shall give them attendance. There al- I some duties that oan done 10-<1&1- to-morrow's dutiea of repa- tion.