Collection Title: Barry Dock news

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
6 articles on this page
Advertising

  ?.,? EFO E YOU PROPOSE oTf ypical f) t-) 5 DIeAxMqOuNisD i!ely CUIII.'Ift hoop ??''?'?S?/??????? ?BB??ETF'O?R?E f'tYMOlttU ttP?tRtu? Ptt ?U«S' ?E?if?Typ!ea)??????????-?-? ^jS^/V L N??t ??t?? N ???? Nt?N ????MN tH.SAMUELS "?tL?-=?? BOAT.SET f1M6 ????? /?XW?? Find out the Lucky Gem for your lady-love's birth monA—they'll teUyoa AMAZtMC .???S?? I \^fTt ^S)r' *\S1 nt sW/lr\ BEFORE YOU PROPOSE^gJ aO1P8K ct. Gpho irdes in ibct. x8ct! F/ ??S? '/? ?-? ??!'?.??<'t? Ring has her own Lucky Gem beautifupy mounted with Diamonds, in a Gold.. O ???????'????''f? richly carved setting of latest design in Solid Gold. hundreds to t&v HALF-HOOP mwe J  ?.??- ? t t?r^\ 70 years' reputation for unrivalled value, too. See the windows to-day at saving for v^ifTTfrjTfov "tones, C;:nlsf larger    ? ST, MAKY STREET you  ?S2? IIL5FT HANDSOME KEEPER (3 doorg from Beautifully carved ■■ SAMUEL 1 DUKE 81. st. Johns Square .^liflniJTiJ'a /INJ7 buckle design in oct.' ^ill»/^jyA IfczSE&F&rA. M MM mmm M? ?P??"?'oct. \? ?????\? 1Q/6gr, <\V\WV\V\\V\\V\WV\VVVW\%VWWWWWVWWVWWWWWWWWWWr j | No Household | I ean be really happy if any o:?i.dSound healhina i £ family is a boon priceless beyond words, and without it, success and £ ? felicity are practically impossible. Much illness is positively unnecessary > ? and is occasioned chiefly by neglect. Much anxiety given on this account $ < to near and dear ones is, therefore, avoidable. It is of the utmost import- + r J ance that a reliable remedy should always be at hand to relieve the Mrliest symptoms of indisposition. Beecham's Pills are an excellent house- $ | hold medicine—safe to take and sure in their curative results. No home | I hold Should Be in Without ? them. They exercise a beneficial effect upon the liver, gtomach, kidneys i < and bowels. They give speedy relief, and, in time, they remove most of ? the ailments connected with these important organs. Attacks of bilioue- 5 $ QCM, constipation, flatulence, headache, dyspepsia and other disorders of > the digestive system are speedily dispelled by BEECHAM'S j ¡ Thre is yet PILLS on the ■ j There is yet another point that you should mark on the tablet of your | > memory. Boecham's Pills, in addition to their acknowledged value in ? kidney, liver and stomach disorders, have a specially beneficial effed in$ ? ?u?L ailmonta ?3 arR p??n Har ? women, many of whom endure needless £ pain and ill-health through ignorance of this important fact. < > ,$j mi WINDSOR HOTEL, HOLTON ROAD. BARRY DOCKS. PAMiLY AND COMMERCIAL HOTEL. WINE & SPIRITS OF THE CHOICEST QUALITY. BRAIN'S FLAGON ALES AND STOUT. ms?-cus« SILLIAH0 AND ASSEMllY.ROOMS. STABLING. tI&.).NORE8 OF THE BRISTOL, WEST OF ENGLAND, k SOUTH WALES OPERATIVES PROVIDENT SOCIETY, THE LOYAL DAVID DAVIES LODGE Q.U.O.O.F., AND THE STEAM ENGINE MAKERS' SOCIETY •TAT. T«r. 359 Basbt. T. H HILL, MANAGER. VICTORIA HOTEL, BARRY DOCKS. E. WILLIAMS, PROPRIETOR. BASSETT ARMS HOTEL KtMILY A.ND OOMMEBOIAL), HOliTON IZOAD, BARRY DOCKS, Midway between Barry Dook and Oadozbon Sbaltone), SPIRITS OF THE BEST QUALITY AND WELL MATUEED CHOICEST WINES AND CIGARS. WORTHINGTON'S CELEBRATED BITTER ALE ALWAYS ON DRAUGHT BILLIARDS with Burroughs and Watts' latest Improved Cushions. Head Quarters of most of the Leading Societies of the District. PROPRIETOR A. J. HOPKIN.    OA STLE ?o T E L, BARRY DOCKS. ONLY ONE QUALITY, THE BEST. Hast of the Societies of the District use the above Hotel for Meeting purpose MRS. FARMER, PROPRIETRESS. • »■'■■■ < Barry Dock Hotel, 'Phone 267 Barry. Facing Barry Dock it^ilway Station. UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT. COMMERCIAL AND FAMILY. Splendid Banquet Hall for Balls, Receptions, & Dinners Special 16 Luncheon. Billiards, 3 Tables. IIY. J. HAZELL, MANAGER. Late Manager Gower Hotel, London. THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED IN THE BARRY AND CADOXTON DISTRICT. FURNITURE REMOVED DAVID PAULE -TT, Furniture Carefully Removed. I Vans of all sizes kept. By Hour or Contract. Light and Heavy Hauling done at Moderate Prices. Estimates Free. POSTING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES Estimates Free. David PAULETT, Coal Merchant, Court-road, CADOXTON-BARRY. Offiaes-STATION YARD & MARKET MEWS, CADOXTON. Telephone No. 349] Suitable Luggage Carts kept for Commereial-, etc. Weddings a speciality. Grey Horses kept. I Place your Furnishing1 Order In the hands of this well-known Firm with the ftilliknowledge that no dIort will Le spared by the a in ,-Ivin, you the Highest Satisfaction!! A visit to our show-rooms will show you the kind of Furniture you require— tastefully designed, soundly constructed of the best materials, and care- fully finished-Furtilture that will last a lifetime and bo a source of pleasure all the time. Our huge stock caters for all tastes and all pockets, and is.always open for free inspection. You are cordially invited to pay us a visit, and we shall be pleased to give advice and quotations if desired, to help you in furnish- ing your home in the best, most comfortable, and at the same time, most economical manner. '*? BEVAN  A MO ?*?????? ? ?????' COMPX '

I CLUB WINDOW

I CLUB WINDOW. .— —— Cardinal Bourne is a wonderful linguist, speaking six or seven lauguages with ease. It is said that it only takes him six months to pick up a working knowledge of any lan- guage. Mr. Roosevelt knows many good stories of the Rough Riders, whom he commanded in the Cuban War, and, "for old time's sake," these old comrades of his are always glad to help him at an election. "On one occasion," ¡tys Mr. Roosevelt, "a Rough Rider from Texas came with me on an electioneering trip and made a speech in my favour. But his intentions were better than his method, and when he got up to speak this is what he said: My fellow-citizens, vote for Roose- velt Vote for Roosevelt, and he will lead you as he led us, like sheep to the slaughter! The general laugh that fol- lowed, however, was not prejudicial to Mr. Roosevelt's chances in the least. I w Mr. David R. Francis, American Ambassa- dor to Russia, has had a remarkable career, having become mayor of St. Louis when only thirty-five years of age. He was mayor from 1885 to 1889, Governor of Missouri from 1889-93, and Secretary of the Interior from 1896-7. On one of his visits to America, Paderewski, the eminent pianist and composer, was in- troduced, somewhat against his will, to a man of little apparent culture, who pro- fessed great interest in music and much in- timacy with its finer phases. "We artists, you know, Mr. Paderewski," he remarked, "have our moods and tastes in common, which the ordinary man is incapable of understanding or sympathising with. You, Mr. Paderewski, have your instrument, to which your life is devoted, and I have mine. I rejoiae in you as a brother artist." "And what," inquired the great virtuoso, with desperate politeness, "is your instrument, Mr. -? "The concertina, sir," was the I proud response. WWW Sir Edward Carson relates a delightful story ooncerning his son, which shows the contempt that "the young idea" has for parental honours. It was not long after Sir Edward had relinquished the important poat of Solicitor-General, and he was addressing an audience on the methods for examining the candidates for the services. "I had a boy," said Sir Edward, "who went through that ordeal. I waited outside until it was over. When my son came out, I asked what had been said to him. 'A lot of rot,' he re- plied. They asked me if my father was the Solicitor-General, and when I said that he was, they wanted to know why I wasn't fol- lowing in his footsteps. I replied that, per- haps, after I had failed at this job, I would take it iii) The King of Spain made his first public appearance on a velvet cushion covered with a lace veil, and carried by the Prime Minis- ter of Spain. He was born in the morning; had the event taken place at night, red lamps would have been lit to announce the fact. As it was, the Royal Standard was hoisted and a salute of twenty-one guns fired. The King can hardly have been "a sturdy little recruit," for one newspaper de- scribed him as "the smallest possible quan- tity of a King." Mr. Albert Chevalier tells a good story about his early days on tour. After appear- ing one night at a small provincial hall, he told the manager that he did not expect to get such a cordial reception as the audience had given him. "What makes you say that?" said the manager. "I did not notice it." "Didn't you hear them banging their walk- ing-sticks and umbrellas on the floor?" asked Chevalier. "That wasn't applause," replied the manager. "The post-office is on the floor above us, and they were stamping letters for the mail! » » # Mr. Joseph Hocking, the novelist, was first educated at a little village school in Corn- wall, were the fees were graduated accord- ing to the social position of the parents. He learnt no Greek or Latin there, but had arithmetic, algebra, and Euclid thoroughly drubbed into him by a master who was a very good mathematician. He and his brother Silas probably became novelists through their mother, who had a wonderful gift for narrative, and used to tell the chil- dren innumerable stories of wizards, fairies, smugglers, and apparitions. Young Joseph Hocking used to imagine himself a pros- perous author with about 4:8,000 a year, and editors constantly begging him to contribute articles and stories to the pages of their papers. # ♦ Sir Charles Wyndham was once asked to exploit a certain reciter, and gave an "At Home" for the purpose, at which Mr. Glad- stone was present. It was a terribly hot afternoon, and the reciter announced oJ that he would give "Elaine" by Lord Tennyson. After the recital, Sir Charles went to < the "G. 0. M." and said, "I'm afraid you've had a trying time with all this heat?" "Not at all," was the reply. "I have had a charming afternoon. I thank you for ask- ing me, and now I am quite refreshed I can run back to the House." Sir Charls was elated, for the rather "heavy" "Elaine" had been a success after all. He rushed to the stage, where he found his guests waiting for him and for tea. "What have we done to you," they cried, "to give us 'Elaine' on a day like this? Surely there was something lighter to choose?" "Lighterr" echoed Sir Charles. "That's the trouble with you Society people, you're all so frivolous. I gave you a classic treat. Why, Gladstone has just told me he had a delightful after- noon." "Of course he had," WaE; the re- joinder, "for he was asleep all the time!" Mr. Lloyd George has a gift of repartee which never fails him. "I am here," he began once at a political meeting, when a voice chimed in, "So am I." "Yes," came the overwhelming retort, "but you are not all there!" The Right Hon. Andrew Fisher, the High Commissioner for Australia, began life as a pit boy at ten, with his father, who was a working collier. He practically educated himself, and, as the years went by, worked so earnestly for the betterment of the con- ditions under which his fellow-workers laboured, that he aroused the antagonism of employers, was blacklisted, and forced to Emigrate to obtain employment. This was in 1885, when he was twenty-three. Eight years later he entered the Queensland Parliament after working in the goldfiekls. where his sterling character earned for him much popularity among the diggers. A keen debater, organiser, and labour stndent. lie steadily climbed the ladder of political fame and success, culminating in his appointment as Prime Minister of Australia ii 1910. To his labour friends, however, he is still Andy, the pit bov of Kilmarnock, and although his: native country did not treat him kindly. Mr. Fisher cherishes no bitter feelings against it. He still loves the land of "banks and braes." and dotes 011 Burns. Admiral Sir George Warrender is a very keen yachtsman, and is one of the few British admirals who is also a member of the Royal Yac-lit Squadron. He has .seen strenuous service both on land and sea. His first experience of fighting was with the Naval Brigade in the Zulu War of 1879, six vears after he joined the Navy, and he again Raw fighting in the China War, when lie was to tlif, rear-admiral of the I China Squadron.

IFELL FROM SKYLIGHT

I FELL FROM SKYLIGHT. MYSTERIOUS FATALITY AT RHOOSE. Frederick Deo (17), of 15, Palmier- streot, Cadoxton-Barry, was killed whilst at work at Rhoose Cement Works on Friday last. ShorUy aft? breakfast he cHmbed to the top of the mill-house, and in a few minutes acci? dentally feLl through the skylight, ? ?depth of 30ft. Some men ruined to his assistance, but the unfortunate young ?man sustained such serious injuria that he succumbed before the arrival of Dr. Mason Jones from Barry. THE INQUEST. Mr. Archibald Daniel, the deputy; coroner, held an inquest at Cadoxtoll- Barry Police Station, on Monday after- noon, on the body of Frederick Thomas Dee (17), son of Private W. Dee, of the 12th Welsh Regiment, a labourer, living at 15, Palmer-street, Cadoxton, who was killed by falling fironi the roof of the coiilmill at Hhoosc C ('incut Works on Friday. Mr. W. Edwards, solicitor, Cardiff, was present on behalf of the proprietors of the Cement Works: and Mr. D. Timothy, H.M. Inspector of Factories, also attended. I The evidence of Sydney Durston, the kilnman, showed that for some unex- plained reason deceased on Friday morning went up three flights of stairs to the roof of the building, a height of 30ft. and in a few minutes he fell through the skylight to the ground, where lie li Nr iiiicoiisciotis, and suc- cumbed in a few minutes. Thomas Maidment, also employed iIl the mill, gave similar evidence, but neither witness was able to say what was the business of the deceased 011 the roof. The works manager, Mr. James Watts, said the lad had no right what- ever on the roof, and his object in going there was a mystery. The Jury's verdict was one of "Accl- dental death." with a recommendation that the doorway leading to the roof b0 closed t(-) pr(,?7e iit i repetition of tlio closed to prevent a repetition of th?

IX AID OF ST JOHN MILITARY HOSPITAL BARRY ISLAND

IX AID OF ST. JOHN MILITARY HOSPITAL. BARRY ISLAND. Organised by Mrs. Pardoe. the sup" erintendent of'St. John Military Ho'" pital. Barry Island, another Jarge aP very siicc«sisjful concert took place oll Saturday evening last at Friars' p,oidt,. in aid of the funds of that highly e- serving institution. The Band -Ile 3rd Welsh Regiment, now a reoognl feature at all local concerts, was pre- sent, and rendered opera and other selec- tions during the evening, which were taken advantage of by a large nU'mbet of couples, who waltzed and two-steppe with great gusto. Wounded made the cocoanut shies and ring gameS an attractive feature of the popular affair, while the houp-la was also d source of Jílnch enjoyment. Solos and gymnastic displays were given, and the Barry Sea Scouts also contributed to an enjoyable eveniiig. augmented bV the fresh breeze which blew in from th0, channel.

A SAMPLE OF HADES I

A SAMPLE OF HADES. I The parson hiad a predilection fof liquid cayenne with his meaJs, and NN70 given on his travels to taking a bottle into the coffee-room with him. One day an hotel acquaintance fbt table eyed the bottle with curiosity, and the clergyman politely offered it to h1111, adding that a little assisted the flavour of the viands. But the acquaintance poured the contents with such literal#-? on his plate that, after tasting the stuff- it burnt his tongue, and lie gasped and choked for a considerable time. "Don't you like it?" asked the elergy" man., kindlv. '"Like it! exclaimed the other. "1 don 't see how anybody but one of youf cloth could!" "llV. what do you mean?" "'Well/ was the reply, "I hav^ known plenty of parsons who pre-ach Of hell-fire, but you are the first I've me who keeps s\ sample of it 11 d v

I I RIlEl TMATISM KIDNEY TROUBLE

RI-lEl TMATISM- KIDNEY TROUBLE. Rheumatism is due to uric acid cryst in the joints and muscles, the result of exc?s sivc uric acid in the system that the kido^ failed to remove as nature intended, and t? acid is also the cause of backache, lumbag^ sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gr?t dropsy. ESTORA TABLETS, a specific basd on modern medical science, are the successlb treatment, and have cured numberless f stinate cases after the failure of all Ctl"ir tried remedies, which accounts for tb? superseding out-of-date medicines s?td 'It price beyond all but the wealthy. Es??? Tablets fully warrant their des?iptio?" honest remedy at an honest ?rice, 1/? Pjj, box of 40 tablets, or six for ?/9. All cllf?- ists, or postage free from 'Estora ,e32, l Charing Cross-road, London, W.CC.-O-,13arrf Agents, W. T. Hic k Agents, W. T. Hick ? Co., 48, H?t