Collection Title: Barry Dock news

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
14 articles on this page
No title

1 Never dip knife-handles in hot water. It loosens them. s When washing tuasore silk use bran water n place of soap. f Odd scraps of flannel make good polishers r for linoleum and oilcloth. f Spoons stained with egg should be rubbed with damp salt before being washed. Spirits of salta will remove nearly every- thing in the way of tarnish, soot, grime, or mould from brass. Cilt chinawore should never be washed in soda-water, soap alone should be used. [ Feather beda should be shaken every day -ulid turned. Let the bedroom window be "Open while the operation is being performed. E Before cleaning the knives, warm the knifeboard in front of the fire. The knives I' will polish more quickly and easily. A little cornflour added to the salt in the salt-cellar will prevent it from hardening. H'alf a teaspoonful to two tablespoonfuls of salt is sufficient. Save used tea leaves, steep them for twenty minutes in a pail, then strain and use the liquid for cleaning paint, oilcloth, | mirrors, and similar things. When washing dusters after using them -to polish furniture, add just a little ammonia to the water in which they are put to soak. Where breadcrumbs are needed in a recipe, put crust and crumb twice through the mincer. It does just as well, and is more economical than ordinary breadcrumbs. After polishing windows, moisten a clean rag with a very little glycerine and rub it i, over the glass. Windows done this way do » not "steam," and last clean much longer. I Never put the sugar from lemon-peel into cakes. It is likely to make them heavy. Save it for sweetening milk pudding or custard. to either of which it is a great improvement.

No title

To SA VB EGGS. If the milk used for bread-and-butter pud- ding is first boiled instead of being used -cold, and poured over the sugared slices, "when cooked, the mixture will adhere as if I an egg had been used. 8 FLANNELETTE NON-INFLAMMABLE. iTo render flannelette non-innammable, ?? rinse the flannelette in water to which one ?? ounce of alum has been added for every-four ?? <;uart

No title

K SOME USEFUL RECIPES. I t" To RE-IIEAT COLD BEEF.—Cut about one .pound -of cold roast beef into slices. Melt an ounce of butter in a saucepan and add to it two ounces of streaky bacon cut into dice, and add one onion sliced. Fry these to a  light brown. Then put in the 8lioes of beef, and pour three-quarters of a pint of tomato sauce over all, and cock slowly for half an hour without allowing llio contents to boil. Serve with squares of fried bread round the f -dish. COItN BBEAD.—A cupful of Indian meal, lialf a cupful of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one tablespoonful each of @ugar and butter, a good pincli of salt, two -egge,. and a cupful of milk. Mix the baking powder with the flour, stir in the meal, salt, and sugar. Rub in the butter, beat the yolks of the eggs in the milk. nnd add to the •dry ingredients lastly the wliitei-i beaten to a stiff froth. Mix well, form into a loaf, and bake for half an hour in a slow oven. CANADIAN LEMON PIE.-Pllt the juice of one large lemon, one cupful of sugar, one ■■ "cupful of water into a saucepan, and bring r to the boil. Add the yelk of one egg, two ► tablespoonfuls of cornflour, and boil up again. Line a piedish with pastry, and bake it, and fill with the mixture. Beat the white of the egg to a stiff froth, spread over the pie, and put in the oven to brown. Ox KIDNEY STEWED.—Slice the kidney and fry it in hot fat until a light brown colour. Sprinkle it with pepper and aalt, make a gravy with the fat. a little flour, and warm Water; then put the slices itito -a stewpan with the gravy, and stew over a slow fire until, tender; then add a little- good store sauce. A few slices of onion will make the gravy more tasty, but it mu?t bo strained K ?foM eendin? to table,

Advertising

I Sim H THE best way to keep jB the throat thoroughly ■ germ-proof and to prevent H a sudden attack of cold or H H chill penetrating down the H H windpipe to the lungs is to H H make a practice of sucking Ej ■ two or three Peps at inter- jH vals during the day. The powerful germ. killing medicine in Peps comes into H direct contact with all the breathing tubes, and defends ?H ■■ any weak spot in the chest BS ■■ against the dangers that lurk KB Bj in damp and mist or in sudden H weather changes. v |§§ OS For warding off that early §? H MO?MtM? cough and throat ||| H tfW

BARRY DISTRICT NURSING ASSOCIATION

BARRY DISTRICT NURSING ASSOCIATION. WAR OFFICE APPEAL FOR NURSES. I A meeting of the Executive of the Barry District Nursing Association was held at the Nursing Home, Wood- lands-road, Barry Docks, on Friday evening last. Mr. J. A. Kelly was voted to the chair, and the other mem- bers present were Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Llewellyn, Messrs. A. E. Makepeace, A. C. Waite, F. Gilbert, and John Da vies (the hon. secretary). The Matron (Miss Tyson) reported that since the previous, meeting 1,420 nurse visits had been paid to cases throughout the district, numbering 155. There had been five deaths, four due to cancer ang one to apoplexy. Mrs. Griffiths, Royal Hotel, Cadox- ton, had forwarded a donation of £5 to the funds of the Association; and Mrs. Pearson, who had been treated by the nurses, had contributed X4 4s., and had, in addition, promised a subscrip- tion of XI Is. a year. A letter was received from the Ad- visory Committee for the supply of Nurses, asking the Association whether any trained nurses would be willing to come forward for service in military hospitals in case of national emer- gency. The Secretary said the need was ur- gent, but perhaps a nurse could be spared by a re-arrangement of the staff. The Chairman: I think the nurses are doing a national service at present by looking after the cases at home. It was pointed out that there was a great dearth of nurses, for women were releasing men for service all over the country. Mr. J. R. Llewellyn said in the auxiliary hospitals much of the work was being done by untrained nurses from the Red Cross and St. John. t The Matron (Miss Tyson) felt a nurse could not be spared unless a temporary help was secured. It was decided to try to obtain a tem- porary nurse, and if one could be secured, that one of the trained nurses be allowed to volunteer. This was the principal business.

QUARTERLY MEETING OF HOLTONROAD BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOL I

QUARTERLY MEETING OF HOL- TON-ROAD BAPTIST SUN- DAY SCHOOL. I Mr. E. Phelps will preside at the quarterly meeting of Holton-road Eng- lish Baptist Sunday School, on Sunday afternoon next. An edifying pro- gramme of sacred selections has been arranged, and a very hearty welcome is extended to parents and all Sunday school workers. The programmeNvill be taken part in by the Chairman, Mr. W. Lucas, Mr. W. M. Radcliffe, Miss Hilda Williams, Miss Maggie Ridge, Mr. Ivor Morgan, Mr. Horace Hart, Master Herbert Barge, and Master W. Bates..

I BARRY POLICE COURT i

I BARRY POLICE COURT. I FRIDAY. I Before Mr. Samuel Thomas and Mr. T. H. Mordey. MISSING FROM THE SHIP. I Timothy Slavenco, a fireman, was missing from his ship, the s.s. Milly, when she sailed irorn Barry Docks on Wednesday, the 18th ultimo. He was now charged with not proceeding to sea on a vessel chartered by roe Admiralty. Mr. F. P. Jones-Lloyd, solicitor, who appeared for defendant said he was a Russian. He had been going to sea for several years, and always bore a good character. On this occasion he was unwell, and although he told the captain the latter would not listen to him. Fined .an alternative of seven days' imprisonment. CHILDPXI N'S EDUCATION I NEGLECTED. Robert Jennings was summoned for not sending his daughter to school. Mrs. Jonn-niags sa-id she had been very ill, and this was the reason why her daughter was kept at home. Fined 2/6. Margaret Newman and James Os- wald were fined 5/- each for a similar offence. L11 the case of James McGill, defend- ant kept his 13-year-old son home from school to help with the haymaking on the farm. McGill was cautioned. Edward Williams appeared on like charge, and -the case was adjourned. William Price was cautioned for not sending his daughter to school re- gularly. PARTED SIX YEARS AGO. I George H. Sharp was summoned by his wife, Alice Sharp, for persistent cruelty. ,Mr. J. A. Hughes, solicitor, appeared for the prosecution., and Mr. F. P. Jones-Lloyd defended. Mr. Hughes ss id the parties were marked in 1908, .and the wife left her husband in 1910 owing to his cruelty. Mr. Jones-Lloyd contended that the case could not be dealt with. Under the Jurisdiction Aot it could not be heard after six months from, the time they parted. Mr. Hughes explained that he only just had the case entrusted to him, and applied for a summons against the husband for failing to maintain his wife. Application granted. I THE USUAL VISITORS. Henry Hellier and Plrdot Aexeodal were each fined 10/- for being drunk and disorderly. I THANKFUL FOR BEING LOCKED UP. Joseph Hickley, a seaman, who was I summoned for being drunk, when I asked if he had anything to say, said he was very thankful for being locked 1 I up. He had a good night's lodging. Fined 5/ I I COULD NOT FIND THE REGIS- TRATION OFFICE. Emil Bridoux, Antonio Cancans, and William Johnson, seamen, were charged with being aliens, and enter- ing the town without permits. P.C. Brimson said the defendants came ashore on Monday, and tried to find the Registration Office. The office had been transferred to the Docks, and a nofiice wi s put up to that effect. The defendants were ordered to pay 12 each. Hans Peter Bessel, another alien sea- man was 'fined 2/6 for landing from his ship on Monday 'without permis- sion. P.C. Brimson proved tihe case. ALTERED CERTIFICATE OF I DISCHARGE. David Sharkey Ball, when uismissed from the Navy in Glasgow, was left penniless, and, unable to find a mer- chant vessel to engage him, he altered his discharge certificate. He altered the wlord "dismisood" to discharged. He was charged now with the offence. The Bench said it was a very serious matter, and fined defendant 95. ROBBED HIM WHILE HE SLEPT. William Rankin, a soldier, was sum- moned by Fredorick Roe, a young, sailor, who alleged that defendant stole X2 18s. 6d. from him. Roe said he slept at 26, Holton-road, B irry Docks, on the iniglit of the 9th ultimo. Defendant came to his bed- room, iand asked if or some money. Wit- ness told him he could not spare it, as he had just come from London after having his ship sunk by -the enemy. He had lost all his clothes when the ship wenit down. When witness awoke next morning defendant had gone, and the money in his pockets was missing. Mrs. Skinner, who keeps a shop at 26, Holton-road, recognised tlhe accused as the man who slept with complainant on the night in question. Accused admitted that lie stayed the night in the house, but denied the theft. Sent to prison for fourteen days with- out the option of a fia-w. I MONDAY. Before Mr. T. P. Thomas and Mr. Joseph Davies. ABSENT FROM HIS REGIMENT. Charged wilih being an absentee from the 3rd Welsh Regiment, George Drinkwater appeared before the Bench, and was detained to await an escort: from the military. RATE ARREARS. Henry Llewelyn was summoned by I the Barry District Council for non- payment of rates, and an older was made. Mr. John Jenkins, superintend- nt collector, made the a,pplicatti n. SEQUEL TO A STORMY NIGHT. ) A Cardiff t haulier, William Morris, was charged with driving a horse and cairt along the highway at night with insufficient lights. P.C. Garnsiworthy ga.ve evidence of seeing defendant driving with one of his lights out. Defendant said it was very windy on Saturday night, and he could not keeip the light burning. Cautioned. I YOUTHFUL GAMBLERS. P.C. Gomer John proved the case I against Edward ^Spence and -V'illii-mi Bumford, charged with gaming with cards on the public highway on Octo- ber 15th. Defendants pleaded guilty, and were fined 2/6 each. ABSENT FOR TEN YEARS. I John Lewis, who, it was stated, had not appeared at the count for ten years, was charged with being drunk and dis- orderly on Saturday last, and was fined 10/ P.C. Garnsworthy proved the case. SAILOR'S "NIGHT OUT." Wiggo Yensien, a young Danish sailor, came ashore from his ship at Barry Docks without permission on Saturday night, and went to the show- ground, but he got drunk on the way. He was found in the midst of a large crowd wi)th his coat and shirt off, dhal- lenging anyone to fight him. Yen/sen was now charged with being drunk, and further with being ashore without leave. On the first charge he was cautioned, and fined El for the latter. P.C. Bright gave evidence of arrest. OVERSTAYED THEIR LEAVE. Three Dutch sailors, Antonio Mar- tino, Jose Gomez Sroes, and John San- tos, were fined 10/- each for breach of the Aliens' Order. P.C. Brimson explained that defend- ants had passes to be ashore, but their leave fexpined at eight o'clock. He found them at ten o'clock ashore.

THE FOOD QUESTION

THE FOOD QUESTION. So much depends upon a nation's food that no apology is necessary for, referring to the subject again; indeed it is a duty to do so, and readers are recommended to study the little book published free at Offer Dept., 46, Hol- born Viaduct, London, entitled "What to Eat and How to Eat" (send a post- card to-day asking for a copy to be sent you free). One of the direct causes of ill-health is indigestion, and this arises most often from eaiting unsuitable diet, amd bolting food without sufficient mastica- ¡ tion. Thus food, instead of being quickly digested and converted into nourishing health-giving blood, be- comes a fermenting mass, giving rise to flatulence and forming poisons. I Headaches, depression, lack of ap- petite, and the torture of dyspepsia are signs that the stomach has lost tone and is being wrongly dieted. Keep your digestion perfect and eat whole- some food, and you will find the way to be well. Sufferers from indigestion re- quire new blood to cure this painful disorder, and by taking Dr. Williams' pink pills, they will satisfy all the needs of the blood, nerves and stomach. These pills sharpen the appetite, brighten the spirits, banish depression and headaches, and establish good health on a secure foundation of rich red blood. Most dealers sell Dr. Williams' pink pills for pale people, but you must ask for Dr. Williams'—so avoiding imita- tions.

THE NATIONAL MISSION AT ST I ATHAN I

THE NATIONAL MISSION AT ST. I ATHAN. I In connection with the National Mis- sion of Repentance and Hope, the Rev. D. T. Griffiths, M.A., vicar of Llantris- ant, the Bishop's messenger, will offi- cate at servces to be held at the Parish Church St. Athan, to-day (Thursday) and Friday. On both occasions ser- vices will be held throughout the day, with special sermons for woman and children. The object of the Mission is a call-to the faithful to show greater diligence and earnestness in Christian, service.

MAER HEN GYMRAEG YN r MARWI

MAE'R HEN GYMRAEG YN r MARW! LADY'S LECTURE TO BARRY CYMRODORION. I Barry Cymrodorion Society opened its winter session on Tuesdav, the 17th instant, with a lecture by Miss E. Evans, B.A., of the Training College, Barry. The Preslident (Rev. Howell Davies, B.Sc.), occupied the chair, and referred to the exceptional circum- stances now prevailing in Europe: the difficulties U-t societies like those of the Cyuinodorion have to contend with.! He, however, rejoicedtht the Society was in such a flouritshing condition, l and thanked the ladies, in particular, for their fidelity in these times of stress. Many of the members of the Society' have gone forth to take p; it in the mighty conflict; some have made the great sacrifice: other members were ac- tively engaged in succouring the wounded or in assisting in various ways to heLp their country.. The Society was commencing its third series of lectures since the war began, and a hope wsas expressed thai the next ses- sion would be opened under happier J conditions. Mr. Davies was in his happiest vein in introducing the lec- turer, who, on rising to address the meeting, was received with acclama- tion. The titde of the lecture, "Mae'r hen Gymraag yn marw, A'r Beibly yn ei Haw," is a couplet from a poem by Bell Bowen, tho brilliant young poet from Treorchy, who died full of pro- mise at the early "re of 5, in the year 1903. Whilst visilting Ynysddu, in Monmouthshire, thehioimo of Isl wvn. I one of the greatest poets of Wales, who died in 1878, Ben Bowen's fervent Col-, tic spirit became sad and depressed on seeing the Welsh language losing ground, and it was there he wrote the poem, which describes the position and vocation of Wales amongst the nation's of the world, its religious, mission, the beauty and strength of its language, and, dismayed that such a. fine medium of expression was neglected and forgot- ten, he (concluded with the following lines:— A'i gwefus bur yn welw, A'i threm i'r byd a ddaw, 1 Mae'r hen Gymraeg yn marw A'r Beibl yn ei llaw." If the Culture Epochs Theory be cor- rect, namely, that the individual child develops along the same lines as man- kind, then it is certainly probable that he does so along the line of his nation, and consequently lie must ibenefit from the wealth of literature bequeathed him by his ancestors. The only key that will open the porta-L-s of these treasure houses is that Off the Welsh language, and every Welsh child ought to have an undisputed claim to his birthright. Yet parents culpably neglect to foster the Welsh language in their homes, and by so doing impoverish the minds of their children and the contribution of Wales to mankind. Moreover, the neglect of a language not only affects the literature, but also the religious and moral side of a nation. God has re- vealed a particular phase of His char- acter to every nation, whose duty it is to give expression, to that revelation. Consequently, what a calamity it would be to suppress the smallest off the nations of the world. Every nation has its characteristics, but no nation can exist without its language. Language and religion are so connected that a severance would be fatal. Yet many Welsh people, full of zeal for religion, rear a generation of pagans, inasmuch as their children cannot wor- ship in any language. This deplorable situation is entirely due to the in- dolence and indifference of parents to the claims of their children and their nation, and unless the parents awake to their responsibilities, the language and religion of Wales, which form the basis of Welsh nationalism, will cease to exist, -and ipso factor, the nation it- self. True patriotism commences at home, extends to the parish, the county, finally embraces the whole world. The the country, neighbouring countries, and history and literature of a nation plays an important part in its development, and the history affects the literature, and vice versa. The rich Welsh litera- ture was a closed book to its English historians, and owing to .their unac- quaintance with the vernacular, Welsh history had suffered grievously. The recent Renaissance has to some extent remedied this, but a vast amount of work remains to be done. Here the lecturer reviewed briefly the wealth of Welsh literature, and stated that all whose (privilege it is to teach the child- ren of any nation should be imbued with the literature of that nation, for otherwise they will be incapable of in- terpreting the ,nature ,and the. ideals of its children. In Wales, however, teachers and otherp, aire found who, after a long residence, rejoice in the fact that they know not a word of Welsh nor care anything about its literature. Is it a wonder that the Welsh language is losing ground in r SOTl16 districts? Is it fair that such Conditions as is mentioned above pre- I vails? Is it just? The parents slum- i betr and sleep while thsir children's birthright is filched from them. TIiQ future of a nation depends on the masses and not on the privileged few. That has been true of Wales in thak Ipast; the peasants remained true to their language, their ideals and aspirar- tions, whilst the lords became traitors.. The generation of the "lords" remaiii, to-day, but they are correctly designa- ted by he term ",snobs.'f Barry is for- tunately situated to foster Welsh ideal* and aspirations. Its immediate neigh- bourhood is rich in historical associa- tions, and has been .the home and re- sort of numerous Welsh poets and litterateurs. The lecturer concluded an admirable) (lecture by exhorting the audience and a.ll Wales to rous? itself, to be valiant and worthy of the price- less treasure handed down to them. A very hearty vote of thanks, pro- posed by Mr. Bryn Davies, seconded by the Rev. LleweMvn Williams, was ac- corded to Miss Evans. The next lecture will bel by the Rev. Evan Isaac. Treharris, on "Un o hen Emynwvr Cymru."

TO STOP ANY RHEUMATIC PAINS IN TEN MINUTES

TO STOP ANY RHEUMATIC PAINS IN TEN MINUTES. BY JIM SULLIVAN, Trainer of the London Scottish. Famous Physical Instructor and Ex-Middle- weight Champion explains a permanent cure and tells how he keeps his men free from all Uric Acid Disorders, Backache, Kidney Trouble, etc. H Sweating cures, Turkish baths vapour and hot air baths, etc., always quickly limber stiff muscles and joints by driving acids and all other impurities out of the body. But many readers will say they have no time for expensive baths and spa treatments, so I shall 1 explain a substitute even more effective. You. can obtain at slight cost from any chemist about a. half-pound of the common Reudel Bath Saltrates, a small handful of which dis- solved in a hot bath, will produce medicated and oxy- genated curative water. Bathe in this, and you will at onoe understand just why sufferers travel to tha thermal bath springs famous since Roman days, for the Saltrates contain exactly the same curative constituents found in thet natural spring waters. Reudel baths, like natural thermal baths, do untold good by expanding the blood vessels, relieving con- gestion or high blood pres- sure, and stimulating the flow of a pure, rich blood current which courses through every nook and cranny of the system, flushing out all the dangerous impurities, uric acid toxins and disease germs. This is Nature's own method of treating kidney trouble, bachache, and rheumatic tortures, sciatica, lumbago, etc., but to enjoy a natural cure, no one need go- to the expense of a journey to a spa. The Saltrated baths do more good than a dozen "swats," Turkish baths, patent medicines, ointments, liniments or anything else. In specially severe cases, if you also wish to hasten a permanent cure by following the corresponding internal treatment as adminis- tered at the spas, drink occasionally a level teaspoonful of refined Alkia Saltrates in & tumbler of water. This is a wonderfully rapid solvent and thorough eliminant of uric acid, which even the worst cases of rheu- matism cannot resist.

IJUVENILE CRIME ON THE INCREASE

I JUVENILE CRIME ON THE INCREASE. One of the saddest features of tianes, ds the increase in juvenile crime. Whilst adult crime has very largely diminished during the war, the num- ber of offences committed by boys has multiplied. Whether it is due to the. absence of so many fathers from the homes, and -the consequent lack of parental control, or other influences, it is difficult to say. But a novel sug- gestion has been made by a magistrate. with a view of eSecting much-needed reform. The birch-rod is regarded as. one of the most convincing methods of impressing upon bad boys the folly of wrong-doing, and the suggestion has been made that the birchling of a juve- nile offender by a burly constable should be filmed, and shown at the pic- ture palaces which youngsters frequent. Such a picture, it is thought, might act as a more powerful deterrent than all the magisterial warnings and fines. The youngsters who once saw the scene would think twice before lapsing from the path of rectitude.

Advertising

?? Reduced in MB price by |d ?vj per pound. I rmm puritan ygp] SOAP

ADVANCE OF THE PRICE OF MILK AT BARRY

ADVANCE OF THE PRICE OF MILK AT BARRY. In consequence of the high prices oF cows and feeding stuffs, the Barry Dis- trict Farmers and Dairymen giva Notice that the Price of Milk will be 6d. per quart on and after October 29th, 1916, and that the Half-penny, | Measure will be abolished.