Collection Title: Barry Dock news

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
7 articles on this page
Advertising

FOR PRINTING OF Every Description, TRY THE "Barry Dock News" OFFICES, Holton Road, Barry Docks. Holton Road, Barry Docks. Despatch: A Speciality! WEDDING CARDS OF THE CHOICEST DESIGNS AND ARTISTIC EXECUTION MAY BE OBTAINED AT THE "Barry Dock News, "Barry Dock News, L Holton Road, Barry Docks. Cards from 2/6 per dozen. w Cards can be supplied the same day as ordered. x a   ma&ea a tiidcuW  Mb a meal S.rie.No. &ectCocoa  IitIlt a Mad

BARHY POLICE COURTI

BARHY POLICE COURT. I I FRIDAY. I Befbre Mr. R. A. Sprent, Dr. P. J. O'Donnell, and Mr. C. B. Griffiths. I LICENSE TEMPORARILY j TRANSFERRED. I On the application of Mr. Alfred Jackson, solicitor, the license of the Victoria Hotel, Barry Docks, was türn- porarily transferred to Mrs. Emma Williams from her husband, the late Mr. Evan Williams. HIS LONG STANDING GOOD 1 RECORD. 1 John Aubrey, licensee of the Six Bells Inn, Penmark, was summoned fbr selling beer on Sunday, October 29th. Police-constable Charles Lewis gave evidence that on the day in question he saw a woman, named Phoebe Thomas, coming from the Six Bells Inn with something bulky in her pos- session. He found a flagon of beer under her cloak, and the woman told him Miss Aubrey had sold it to her. He went to the inn, and Mists Aubrey admitted the offence. He found a man named John Vizard seated in the house with an empty pint cup before him. The man had a small bottle of whisky and a flagon of beer in his pos- session. Vizard said he had bought it, and Miss Aubrey admitted the sale. The aged defendant then came down- stairs from bed, and said he knew nothing of what had taken place. Mr. Alfred Jackson, solicitor, for the defence, said defendant was aged and infirm. His family had held the license for over fifty years. Miss Aubrey, a niece, was not aware of the new regu- lations, and committed the offence quite innocently. Defendant, had he known, would not have allowed it. The Bench, taking into considera- tion defendant's long standing good record, fined him three guineas. BROUGHT SHEEP INTO BARRY. I Manuel Fereira, master of the steamer Averio, was charged with bringing sheep into Barry Docks on tbo 15th instant, contrary to the pro- visions of the Foreign AnimaJs' Order. Defendant pleaded guilty, and was fined Xl HER GREEK SON-IN-LAW. I Mr. J. A. Hughes, solicitor, ap- peared for the prosecution in a case against Kate Jones, of (Cardiff, charged with failing to keep the peace. Mr. Hughes said the woman was re- cently bound over in the sum of 910 to keep the peace for six months, when she was summoned by Stavro Anstra- dopulous, her son-in-law, for creating a disturbance outside his house in Merthyr-street, Barry Docks. The same day, Mr. Hughes pointed out, defendant went to complainant's house, ased very vulgar language, and threatened to break the windows. The Bench ordered defendant to for- feit XIO, in default a month's impri- sonment. Defendant elected to take the alter- native. I GIPSIES' ERROR. Cornelius Price, Caradog Price, and James Gibbs, gipsies, were charged with cutting underwood on the RomiHv Estate. -'J David Price, keeper on the estate,- said on the 20th of October he found defendants cutting underwood in a wood at Blackton. Defendants said they had permission to out sticks for clothes pegs from Mr. Jamas, Black- ton Farm, which was not on the estate. He took defendants to Mr. James, who substantiated this. Defendant's then said they had mistaken the wood for that on Mr. James' land. Fined 5/- each. JAPANESE SAThOR CHARGED I WITH WOUNDING. A Japanese seaman, -n,a-med Masshi Koski, was charged with wounding Herbert Daniels, another sailor, on Thursday morning. Daniels, who appeared with his head swathed in bandages, said he was in the yard of the Shipping Office, Barry Docks, when three Japs rushed at him, and aocused struck him on the head with an iron bar. Mr. Alfred Jackson, solicitor, who defended, said the men were seamen on the steamer Aldworth, and were paid off on Thursday. It was impos- sible for defendant to give his own account fully of what happened, be- cause he could not speak English, and the interpreter could not understand him. Defendant, however, pleaded guilty, but said he did it because he thought Daniels stole some of his clothes. Dr. Livingstone attended the man, and found a wound two and a half inches long on the back of the head. P.C. Michael Murphy arrested the accused. Koski was fined X5, or a month's imprisonment. CASE OF THEFT DISMISSED. William Galton, an elderly seaman, summoned his landlady, Ellen War- burns, of 28, Fryatt-stroot, Barry Docks, for stealing two blankets, a pair of trousers, and a pair of shoes. Mr. A. Jackson, solicitor, prosecuted, and said Galton went to Cardiff In- firmary and to the Voluntary Hospital, Barry Docks, for treatment after an illness. When he returned to his lodg- ings the clothes were missing. Defendant said complainant owed her six weeks' money, and she pawned some of his clothes before he went to the Infirmary, but he knew that she had pawned them. The case was dismissed. SAJLORS WHO GOT DRUNK. Henry Williams, Peter Rassel, Shoralf" Lydenson, Hubert Feigwright, and Albion Lumborg, sailors, who had got drunk, deposited 10/- each, which was forfeited. Three foreign sailors, Alexander Henrikson, Emanuel George, and An- tonio Christenson, forfeited deposits of Xl each for coming ashore, without permission, from their ships. MONDAY. I Before Mr. J. J. Neale and Mr. I J. M. Jennings. SHEEP ON THE SHIP. I iSperiedon Dracoulis, captain of the Greek steamer Nicetus, was charged with bringing a sheep into port on board his ship, in contravention of the Foreign Animals' Order. Defendant, who pleaded ignorance of the regulations, was fined X2. FROM SEA TO THE MINE. r Patrick Malonev, an elderly seaman, was charged with failing to join the steamship G:reilsön, a vessel chartered by the Admiralty, on October 2nd. P.C. Letheriiiiz said he arrested de- fendant at the Board of Trade Offices on Saturday. In reply to the charge he said, I worked on the ship, and then went to the Bute Colliery. Inspector NV. H- Dirnond, B.T.. said the ship was detained three hours. J1 Defendant now pleaded he was ill. jJ I Mr. Neale: It seems useless impos- ing a fine; you must go to prison for I a month. I LASCAR BOARDED THE LAUNCH. Hassan Abu Said, a Lascar seaman, was brought up and charged with a similar offence. P.C. Henry spoke to arresting defen- dant, who said that all his clothes were on board the steamer Karantos. Defendant said he tried to get on board by means of a launch, but he was too late. He had permission from the chief engineer to be ashore. Fined zC2, or a month. ESCAPADE OF MOTOR CYCLE. I Harold Hopkins, of Neath, was charged with driving a motor cycle and sidecar without lights. Mr. Norman Robertson, solicitor, Cardiff, was for the prosecution, and Mr. W. Leyson, Neath, defended. Mr. Leyson explained that defendant was approaching Dinas Powis, from Cardiff, on the night of Sept. 22. He had a puncture before he reached Dinas Powis. His sister and little child were in the side-car. He took the machine close to the hedge to at- tend to the puncture. Whilst doing so his lights began to dim. According to regulations Hopkins had a white light on the cycle and on the side-car, and a red tail-light. Defendant detached the side-car lamp to attend to the puncture. Whilst he was repairing his puncture a motor car came along, but passed all right. A second car came, and Hopkins waved his lamp, but the car crashed into his machine, which was hit forty yards down the road," and smashed to pieces. The motor sus- tained some small damage. An action which was pending in Oardiff County Court had been settled. He pleaded g" uilty to a technical offence. Mr. J. J. Neale: Defendant will pay the costs. THE TRUANT LIST.. I For breach of schools bye-laws, Ed- ward Williams was fined 10/ or seven days. Mir. Spencer Jones appeared on behalf of the Glamorgan Education Committee. On the application of Mr. D. Rees, Barry school attendance officer, orders to send their children to school were made against Hannah Rees, Elizabeth Smith, Ellen McCarthy, and Louisa Bell. For disobedience of. orders, Charles Johnson was fined 10/ or seven days in default. Wm. Dibble was similarly fined; and Sidney Owen ordered to pay 2/6. I' DOG WORRIED SHEEP. William Thomas, Penmark, was charged with failing to keep his dog under proper control. Rees Thomas, Cobbledick Farm, said he was talking to defendant, when he noticed his dog run into a field. Later he found one of his sheep dead, bleed- ing from the neck. P.C. Charles Lewis said defendant admitted the offence, and promised to kill the dog. Thomas was informed by Supt. Morris that if he killed the dog no action would be taken. Defendant now offered to pay the damage, and the dog was ordered to be destroyed forthwith. THE DRUNKS. John Swanson, a sailor, forfeited a deposit of 10/- for being drunk and disorderly; and Fritz Spruder, a Rus- sian, was fined a like amount.

BLIND MUSICIANS TO GIVE ENTERTAINMENT AT

BLIND MUSICIANS TO GIVE EN- TERTAINMENT AT With their Majesties the King and Queen, and Queen Alexandra, as paitrons, and Sir Arthur Pearson, Bart., as president, the blind musicians will give an evening concert, in aid of the soldiers and sailors blinded in the great war, at the Theatre Royal, Barry, on Sunday next, at eight o'clock. The band of blind performers will give an excellent programme of music.

J BARRY WAR SAVINGS

J BARRY WAR SAVINGS. MORE MEETINGS AT THE DOCKS, A meeting of ffie sub-committee, ap- pointed by the Barry War Savings Committee to deal with social organisa- tions, was held on Friday evening last, when Councillor C. B. Griffiths, J.P., presided. The members present were Messrs. H. lWhIt. Topping, F. C. Mil- ner, and Alfred Mallam. Mr. Milner reported that several meetings at the Docks were addressed by Mr. E. Black, and a number of as- sociations for war savings had been formed in the various departments of Messrs. C. H. Bailey's Works. Ifr. Milner thought Mr. Black should be asked to come again. The Flour Hills Transit Sheds, and the Railway Traf- fic Department had not yet been visited. Up to the present there were 40 associa- tions in Barry, 28 of which had been formed by school children. It was decided to write Mr. Black asking him to address further meetings at the Docks.

BLOOD AS A NERVE TONIC

BLOOD AS A NERVE TONIC. If people would only attend to their blood, instead of worrying them- selves ill," said an eminent nerve specialist, we doctors should not see our consulting rooms crowded with nervous wrecks. More people suffer from worry than anything else." The sort of thing which the specialist spoke of is the nervous run-down con- dition caused by overwork and the many anxieties of to-day. Sufferers find themselves 'tired, morose, low- spirited, unable to keep their minds pn anything. Any sudden noise hurts like a blow. They are full of groundless fears, and cannot sleep at night. Head- aches, neuritis, and other nerve pains are also part of the misery; and it all comes from starved nerves. Doctoring the nerves with poisonous sedatives is a terrible mistake. The only real nerve tonic is a good supply of rich blood. There is only one way to feed the nerves," said a great doctor. The stomach can't do it. The blood is the nerve feeder." Therefore the cure for nurasthenia, nervousness and run- down health is the new rich blood which only the genuiine Dr. Williams' pink pills for pale people are able to make. The revived appetite, improved spirits, and new strength which come after a few days' use of these pills will delight every sufferer. Start them at once, and accept Dr. Williams' only. FREE.—" Nerves and their Needs is a book for nervous people; send postcard to Book Dept., 46, Holbom Viaduct, London.

j THE SAILOR OBLIGED THE SAILOR OBLIGED

j THE SAILOR OBLIGED. THE SAILOR OBLIGED. Young Mr. Hollowell was not much of a preacher, but much to his own surprise and everybody's eLse, he was appointed chaplain on a battleship. He desired to amu-se as well as instruct his men, iand to (that end he arranged a magic-lantern lecture on Bible scenes and incidents. A sailor who possessed a gramophone was secured to discourse appropriate music between the slides. The first pic- ture shown was Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. The sailor cudgelled his brains, and ran through his reper- toire,, but he could think of no piece exactly appropriate. Play up, play up," whispered the chaplain. Suddenly an inspiration struck the sailor, and to the consternation of the chaplain, and the delight of the au- dience, the gramophone squawked out: There is only one girl in this world for me."

Advertising

■MHHMMMHMMKHMMMMMMMHMMHHKMB S Have You any Pain? S W Quicker than anything else, Sloan's Liniment stops pain. Wherever M it maybe, in the joints, muscles, or tissues, M X it searches it out, and lo I in a twinkling JllJSSSu m the pain is gone. No need to rub it in— ?M ??SM? 5 just lay it on, the pain goes at once. A"\ ?-? ? jk m Moth!ngEtMdidwoMuchC