Collection Title: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
LONDON CITY AND MIDLAND BANK

LONDON CITY AND MIDLAND BANK. FINANCING OF THE WAR. The annual general meeting of the share- holders of the London City and Midland Bank, Ltd., was held on Fridav at Cannon-street Hotel, E.C.. Sir 'Edward H. Holden, Bart., presiding. The Chairman, in the course of his address taid that as we stood to-day we were in the midst of great economic phenomena. Our coun- try was overflowing with money and credit. Large profits were being made, due greatly to increased prices, and our working classes were earning larger wages than ever before; some were spending freely, others were saving. The same conditions prevailed in Germany, and re- viewing the position, one was inclined to ask: How was the credit created, and where did the money come from? He went to show in detail how bankers were great manufacturers of credit, and explained how nearly all the loan transac- tions of banks created credit. Examining the statements of the Bank of England, he showed that the bank had created between Jury 29, 1914, and the end of December, 1916, credit to the ex- tent of over 105 millions sterling, and that dur- ing two vears of war nineteen of our principal banks had created 124 millions of banking credit. He then proceeded to analyse the Government borrowings, bhowing how the Government lad created credit and how it ha.d been responsible for some of the banking credit which had been created since the war began. The Government had borrowed between August. 1914, and Decem- ber 31, 1916, over £ 3,000,000,Q00. There was no disorganisation of banks' re- serves when the Government borrowed on Treas- urv Bills, Exchequer Bonds, and other short- term secnrkias, because the amounts lent on them. although withdrawn from the banks, werE) not of sufficient weekly magnitude to inconveni- ence the reserves of the banks before they were again replenished by the return of the with- drawals. He explained how the Government had been able to borrow such large sums. He went or to explain that banking credit was created when Government loans were taken up by banks on their own account, or when banks made I advanee. to their customers to enable them < to subscribe for such loans, because the cash, which had been taken from the bankers' reserves to subscribe for the loans, ultimately came round ag-ain ro the banks and formed new deposits. ENGLAND AND GERMANY'S WAR CURRENCIES. Proceeding, he compared the war currencies of England and Germany, and showed how the note circulation had increased in both countries. Turning to Germany, he examined in detail the constitution of the Reichsbank, the institution in which the whole German financial system was centralised, and which acted as the central bank for most of the great joint stock banks of Ger- many. The direction of the bank, he said, was actually under the control of the Kaiser, through his Minister. Herr von Bethmann-Hollweg, and the bank's operations could be directed along whatever lines he chose to dictate. In addition to its function as the bank of issue for the Gov- ernment, the Reichsbank carried on an ordinarv backing, business. In times of peace its notes were secured according to law by gold bullion or coin, Imperial Treasury Notes, and current German money to the extent of one-third of the notes in circulation; but since the war, by the law of August 4, 1914, they had added another form of cover-viz., the notes of Darlehnskassen —that was, of the small loan banks which had been established In different parts of the empire, and at which advances on all kinds of securities might be obtained. The custom of the Reichs- bank, however, had always been to maintain a minimum of 33 1-3 per cent. in gold only against its notes in circulation. When the war began in July, 1914, the amount of such .notes in circulation was about ninety-four Millions sterling, and by the end of December, 1916. they had reached a total of 403 millions, an Increase since the, beginning of the war of about 128 cent. The gold held by the Reichsbank on July 23, 1914, was sixty-eight millions, being a percentage of 71.7 to the notes in circulation, and by the ('r! of December, 1916, the gold amounted to 126 millions, and the percentage IiaJ fallen to 31.3. Every return of the Reichs- bank since the beginning of the war, with the exception of the one issued on December, 1916. showed that the traditional cover of one-third of srold to the notes in circulation had been main- tained. GERMANY'S LOANS. I The Chairman then enumerated the methods ivbieh Germany adopted to increase the gold j holding of the Reichsbank. Travellers, he said, i had been stopped at the frontiers and their gold taken from them in exchange for notes. The i clergy had preached from the pulpits urging -the people to give up their gold and take notes. Gold | ornaments had been melted down, and the metal I sent 1" wthe Reichsbank in exchange for notes, j The rtoldiers had been given certain privileges in I exchange for any gold which they could collect. ( Again, with a view to collecting gold in the I form of plate, jewellery, etc., estimated to con- tain gold to the value of £ 100,000,000 sterling, the whole country had been agitated, and com- mittees had been appointed in every town and village to urge the surrender of ornaments. Offices had been established where gold might be handed in and Reichsbank ■ notes given in ex- change. and inscribed iron medals were given to those who delivered up their gold. The counterfeiting or circulating of these medals were Severely punished by law. It was also urged thsr pearls .and other valuables be delivered up, po thar they might be sent to neutral countries in payment for credit. Referring to the German long-term loans, he said the total subscriptions to the five German war loans amounted to £ 2,360,000,000, which, together with her floating debt, would raise the total of Germany's war borrowings to over £ 3,000,000,000. Germany had been able to raise so large a. sum in long-term loans and at so uni- form a rate and price of issue by developing in- tensive propaganda methods, and by extending the period of subscription, giving special facilities to small subscribers. The banks also offered to exchange War Loan 1 v for foreign bonds or for the debentures of indus- trial companies. Municipalities offered eitbr to redeem their own debentures, and thus provide means for investment in War Loan or to ex- change directly -War Loan for their debentures. The T .oan bankers lowered their rate oi interest to on IT a fraction above the Reichsbank rate, tn". f¡¡rGdingfaciliies to those who wished to JlleJ:. "ccurities to provide the means for invest- ment i War Loan. The savings banks, the depc's of which had very greatly increased, wa' the necessity to give notice of with- drawal. In those circumstanc.es it was not sur- prising that the number of subscribers had risen frorr 1.177.2.35 in the epr-e of the first War Loan to a maximum of 5,279,645 in the case of the fourth Dari. Aftar referring to the marked change which the war had created in America owing to the inflow of gold into that country, the chairman turned his attention to the banking system of this country, remarking that if they could con- t tinue to keep the banks of this country liquid, as they were at the present time, they would succeo(I in the future not only in re-establishing 11) bottom of nest column).

LONDON CITY AND MIDLAND BANK

our home industries, but they hoped also in pro- tecting and developing our foreign trade to a greater extent than hitherto. Referring to the bank's balance-sheet,-he remarked that their net profits for the year ended December 31 last amounted :to an d that they were. pay- I ing their usual dividend of 18 per cent. for the I year, leaving to be carried forward £ 129.541. which, ifijth the amount brought forward from lass year of 2113,597, made a "total of £ 243,638 j to be carried forward to the next iaecouiit (Cheers). Ha then moved the adoption of the ji x4nort. which was unanimously carried

r CORRESPONDENCE I

r CORRESPONDENCE. I I [WE 60 NOT TFECESMBTLT SH*RB THE OPINIONS EXFRHBBBD I I BS WRITERS IK THIS COLVtiil..i I THE UNIVERSITY OF WALES. I i SIB.-The Welsh nation is threatened by a serious crisis with regard to the control of Uni versity education. In the days of small begin nings the nation had to work out her own sal- vation with little countenance or support from the State. To-day, when the nation demands further and adequate aid from the Government (which L- another name for the people), the Royal Com | mission appointed to deal with the matter i, said to be considering a proposal to vest tlv- supreme control of the University in the han

I Death Well Known Harpists DeathI

-—-  — ■■ Death. | Well Known Harpist's Death. I I The death of Mr. Tom Lloyd, the Llangynog j j i harpist, took place rather suddenly on January j I 15th. A few weeks ago Mr. Lloyd took up work j j at Queensferry, and after a short illnes3 died j at a hospital in Chester. His remains were brought home to LIangynog, and, according to j his oft-expressed wish, were interred at Pen- j nant Melangell Churchyard, off January 18th. The Rector, the Rev. Robert Roberts, officiated. j Mr. Lloyd was 69 years of age, and had no rela- tives in tihe/ district. He was born in the neigh- [ bourhood of Glyn Ceiriog, but removed to Llan- ) gynog when about 17 years of age, and here he I j spent the greater-part of his life. He also work- ed at Festiniog and other places. Years ago he emigrated to the States, and worked for a few I years at Pensylvama. He was a quarryman by trade. Mr. Lloyd was a person of most genial I disposition, reserved and quiet and was very I much liked He was a good scholar, very fond of reading and a capable musician, j Soon after nettling at Liangynog, he took to I harp-playing, both he and the late Mr. Evan Peter Jones, Tanybryn Cottage, Llangynog, I being pupils of the famous harpist, the late Mr. David Peter Jones. J-ioyd was an excellent pupil, and soon mastered the intricacies of the harp and became, an expert player. He loved his instrument. It was his companion and friend throughout his career. Had he been less reserved and more pushing, he would undoubted- ly have been in the very front rank of our pub- lic and leading harpists. He cared not for show and popularity; but loved his rural retreat., At the Great World's pair at (Thicago many years ago, he won the first prize for the be?t harp. His production waa a beautiful instru- ment, and was highly praised by the adjudi- cators. Since then, Mr. Lloyd made many harps and sold them to some of the leading Welsh families. His pupils included Miss W-illiamg, late of Llanwddyn Rectory, Miss Lloyd (Telynores Tegid), Bala, and Miss Nancy Richards (Tely- nores Maldwyn), who has won three times in succession the prize for harp playing at the National Eisteddfod. The border district is the poorer by the death of the last of the old Llangynog harpists, and his tall upright figure will be much rpissed. in the district. Spine years Ago a special sketch of Mr. Lloyd's career appeared in tW "Adver- tiser." ,from the pen-of Mr. Reece, School House, Llangynog.

I Lord K enyons Claim against War OfficeI

I Lord K enyon's Claim against War Office. Lord Kenyon made a claim on Tuesday week at the Defence of the Realm Losses Royal Com- mission in respect of a house at Chelmsford which had been commandeered by the military auth- j orities. The claims were for rent at the rate of &22 16s. 6d. per week from February, 1916. The-shooting rights, which were let to Mr. Pil- ington, were formerly the subject of a separate claim. The Commissioners made an award of,Blo 10s. a week.

Advertising

THE LONDON CITY & MIDLAND BArK LiaalTEEh ESTABLISHED 18S6. Aathorised Capital £ 28,200.800 0 0 ) Subscribed Capital £ 22,947,804 0 0 Paid-up Capital £ 4,780,792 10 ft Reserve Fuud £4,000,000 0 0 DIRECTORS. SIR EDWARD H. HOLDEN, BART., Chairman and Managing Director. WILLIAM GRAHAM BRADSHAW, ESQ., London, Devuiy ilhairman.. THE ItlGHT HON. LORD AIREDALE, Leeds. SIR PERCY ELLY BATES, BAST., Liverpool. ROBERT CLOVER BEAZLEY, ESQ., Liverpool. THE RIGHT HON. LORD CARXOCK, G.C.B., London. I Hv'i) DAVIES, ESQ" M.P" Llandinam. FJ{AK DUDLEY DOCKER, ESQ., C.B" Birmingham.j FREDERICK HYNDE FOX, ESQ. Liverpool. H. &iVii  I ?M,t38?9 15 8 1 smsamsxsBaBBizsssmm&z j A s. d. By Cash in hand (Inelud'ng Gold Coin £ 7,000,080) and Caoh at Bank of England I., 47,073,685 4 < „ Money at Call and at Short Hotiee and Stock Exchange Loans 8,844,377 19 16 „ Investments: War Loans, at cost (of which ZI,Aq,b,ode is tsdgeg for Public and other Accounts) tind other British Government Securities .33,399o634 13 Stocks Guaranteed by the British Government, India Stocks, Indian Kaihvay Guaranteed Stocks and Debenture* 326,468 13 0 British Railway Debenture apd Pro. fsi erioe Stacks, British Corpora- tion Stocks 1,824,813 0 4 Cofcwial and Foreign Government Stocks and Bonds 751,153 12 11 Sundry investments 788,011 e 19 117,345,177 2 9 „ Advances on Current Accounts, Loans on Sssarity and other Accounts 83,888:8E6 17 4 „ Lia&^ilies of Custodiers for Accept- ances as per contra 7,229,783 12 s j Bank Premises, at Head Oflloa and Branches ""f. 2,753,725 3 S <6191,183^8^ IS < PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT for the Year endisg 31st December, 1916, ■ >• it s. d. To Interim Dividend at the rate of per oent.  per annum for t?ia i haSf-year ending 30th Jfrne, lels, lose !nooma Tax 344,217 1 3 m Dividend pSyalsia on 1st February, 1317, at the rate of 13 per cent, per annum, leaalitoome Tax 322,703 8 11 Investment Account 632,381 0 6 Payment of Salaries to Members of the Staff serving with His Majesty's Forces and Bonus to others 287,608 13 2 n Balance carried for- ward to next account 243,538 S 10 I 10 8 < s. d. By Balance from last Aocount 118,887 is 2" „ Met profits for the year ending 31st December, 1916, after pro- vid .-is for all Bad and Doubtful Debts MI *» — ls93164,gs ti "1:!5Ó, ■ L_ £ 3a CPWARD H. HOLDEN, CHAIRMAN AND MANAGING DIRECTOR. H. SIKPSON GEE, NIMTRTOBI W. G. BRADSHAW, DEPUTY-CHAIRMAN. PERCY E. BATES, J DI]ILICCTON& REPORT OF THE AUDITORS TO THE SHAREHOLDERS OF THE LONDON CITY & MIDLAND LANT LIMITED. In accordance with ths prorlslous of Sub-section 2 of Section 113 of the Companies (Consolidation) Act, 1908, we report as fcllovvs We have sxamined the above Balance Sheet in detail with the Books at Head Office and with the certified Returns from the Branches. We have satisfied ourselves as to the correctness of the Cash Balances and the Bills of Exchange and have verified the correctness of the Money at Call and Short Notice. We have also verified the Securities representing the Investments of the Bank, and having obtained all the Information and explanations we have required, we are of opinion that such Balance Sheet is properly drawn up so as to exhibit a true and correct view of the state of the Company's aftairs according to the best of our information and the explanations given to ns and M shown by the books of the Company. WIIINNEY SMITH & WHINNEY, CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS, LONDON. 11 Ih January 1817, Auditors.

II Welsh Artists Adventure at Ithe Front vli

II Welsh Artist's Adventure at the Front. v -li I Mr. Christopher Williams, the Welsh artist, who wa.s educated a.t the High School, Oswestry, and who painted the portrait of the late Town Clerk of Oswestry, which now hangs in the Council Chamber at the Guildhall, recently went to the Somme battle front at the request- of Mr. Lloyd George to paint a picture of the charge of the Welsh division at Marnetz Wood, only to have the unpleasant experience' of being arrested as a spy. He has given the following account of what happened:— I had wandered some distance from the officer in whose charge I was, and happened to "be the only man in civilian clothes in the locality. Everybody stared at me, and some chaps com- ing back from the firing line noticed me emery- ing from a trench. They were staggered. 1 proceeded to sketch, and they stared dumb for a while. Then one of them approached and asked what I was doing. I told him I was sketching and in charge of an officer who was some distance away. He allowed me to com- plete the sketch and then marched me to where the officer was, but he was not satisfied with the explanation of either of us. Nothing of this sort had happened before, and tire soldier was very doubtful as to our passes and passports, so he marched us both to his officers' quarters. Here the authorities were satisfied and dismissed us with courteous apologies for the inconvenience caused. The soldier, however, was net satisfied. He was convinced I was a German spy, though I spoke Welsh and English, and that my pass- ports were forged, for I discovered he had been very closely examining my chauffeur. Of course i I understood that the man only did his duty, but I did not realise how desperate the position j was until I mentioned the incident at the War Office on my return. Then I was told: "Mr. Williams, you are a very lucky man. It's a wonder you were not shot at sight." In addition to the painting of the victory of Marnetz Wood, which, it is hoped, will even- Mam,tz ivood, le?i tually find a home in the* Welsh National Museum, Mr. Christopher Williams is engaged oii a p-ortraiti of Mr. Lloyd George.

No title

It is 15tated that the National Service scheme will apply to all males from 18 to 60, and that Ireland will not be included. Dr. Caradoc Roberts, director of musjc at the University College of North Wales, Ban- gor, has been asked to give evidence regard- ing the future of Welsh music before the Royal I Commission on University Education in Wales, I .in London next month.

I Welsh National Memorial

I Welsh National Memorial. I RESIGNATION OF THE SECRETARY. Mr. T. H. itrdwards, Aberystwyth, presided at a meeting of the council of the King Edward VII. Welsh National Memorial .Association, helct at Shrewsbury on Friday. Negotiations were reported to be, in progress with a view to railway travelling facilities being granted to the associa- tion at the old fares. The resignation of tha secretary to the association (Mr. Gwiiym Hughes) was announced, he having accepted an appoint- a v ment on the headquarters staff of the Director of National Service. Tributes were paid to the services rendered the association by Mr. Hughes.. The council approved the appointment made by the Finance Committee of Mr. F. J. Alban to undertake the duties of secretary in addition to his duties as chief accountant and controller, } and of Mr. Edwin Redford, the present assistant secretary, as deputy-contsjpller. Commenting on the statistical return of patients treated, the general director said it was an interesting fact that not a single male patient -ig l e iua?'e patieiit was awaiting treatment in Wales, accommoda- tion having been provided for all who*had mads application for treatment. He did not think England, Scotland, or Ireland could mike that boast.

University of Wales i

University of Wales. i I A meeting of the National Committee &eai- I ing with the proposals for revising find no.. j constructing the constitution of the University j of Wales was held at Shrewsbury on Friday- and Saturday, Mr. E. T. John, M.P., pres:

I Bonus for Merioneth Teachers

Bonus for Merioneth Teachers, line Menonetih Education Committee at Ba's on Wednesday con^dered the appicaiion o. school teachers for a war bonus, and agreed to grant half the dem&nd, amounting to .61,200 eq,??,aPe?!t to lid rate. B was poin?d out that owin? to the depopuj&tiom of the county t? Government, srrant- to the schools had been reduc- ed by £ 3,000. It was agreed to appeal to the Government for immeadate special grants to ?ust demand of the teaching profession of the country It was reported that Dr. R. T. Edwaxdo, the county medscal oiffcer, owing to iMie&Mi had aont m hia .resignation.