Collection Title: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
8 articles on this page
Advertising

941ts feu Aurtioit. "4, ARTHUR IlkVERY, AUCTIONEER & VALUER. Fales of all Descriptionand Valuation for Transfer, Mortgage or Probate made. BAILIFF under the Law of Distress Amendment ¡ Act. SALEROOMS— The Pantechnicon, BERWYN STREET, LLANGOLLEN. I Rooms are always open for the reception of Goods for Sale. II No Storage Charges. PLAS GERAINT," LLANGOLLEN. TO BE SOLD BY PRIVATE TREATY, con- tainingj Entrance HalL I 2 Large Entertaining Rooms. j 6 Bedrooms. Large Kitchen, Larder, Wash-house, Bath- J room, etc. Offers to purchase to be made to A. AVERY, The Pantechnieon, Llangollen. I LLANGOLLEN SMITHFIELD. USUAL SALE OF FAT AND STORE STOCK. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13th, 1917. I No Sale next Tuesday. JONES & SON, Auctioneers. nblir Jlrrttxes. CORWEN UNION. CHILDREN'S HOME. THE GUARDIANS of Corwen Union require fc their Children's Home. the services of an ASSISTANT, not under 18 years of age. The. appointment will be made subject to the provisions of the Poor Law Officers Super- annuation Act, 1896, with Board, Lodging end Washing provided. Applications, stating Salary required, age, present- and previous employment, and acüm- panied by THREE Testimonials, to be sent to me not later than THURSDAY, the 8th t'av of February, 1917. By Order of the Guardians. E. DERBYSHIRE. Oierk. Union Offices, Corwen. 26th January, 1917. b 2. SCALE FOR PREPAID ADVERTISEMENTS One Three Six Insertion. Insertions. Insertions, s. d. s. 

The Territorials

The Territorials, Our columns as Lieut.-General Sir Francis Lloyd, whoin we heartily con- gratulate on his promotion, was good enough more than once to bear public testimony during his tenure of the Welsh command-have dweys offered the most hearty support to the Territorial system. We have done so, not only be- cause we have always admired the voluntary self-sacrifice on the part of members of the Force itself from a time long before the war, but because we believe it was re- modelled by Lord Haldane (whose name should not be forgotten in this connection) on the most effective basis possible—a reli- ance on the inspiration of local patriotism to build up and maintain this important branch of home defence. The result was that on the outbreak of war the Force re- sponded with splendid alacrity to the fac larger call that was suddenly and unex- pectedly made upon their service. Some of them, like the 4th Royal Welsh fusiliers, have distinguished themselves, not less con- spicuously than the old regulars," in the hottest corners of the French and Turkish battlefields. Others, like the 4th K.S.L.I., have patiently, and not less usefully, for two years performed the less exhilarating duty of garrisoning India and Hong Kong. All, without hesitation or demur, have gone beyond the letter of their original contract in fields of supremely responsible national service, in a way that has earned for them a willingly acknowledged debt of public gratitude even from those former critics who, in peace time, had been often far too ready to regard their self-sacrificing labours with ungenial contempt. For this credit must be given in the first place, of course, to the men of the Territorials them- selves, because without their spirit of patriotism the system must have failed. But no inconsiderable measure of public debt is also due to the members of the County Associations, whose organising zeal and faith in their possibilities has done so much to support the.local battalions and keep them up to strength. We are particularly glad, therefore, to note Lord Derby's assurance, last week, to the chairman and secretaries of the Terri- torial Associations that these valuable organisations are "not to be destroyed in any way," but, on the other hand, to be "encouraged, built up and strengthened." That is a wise policy, because it recognises what some other Government departments obstinately ignore that in any campaign in which public opinion requires to be stirred the best means of doing it are through local organisationscomposed o-f those who are most fully acquainted with local con- ditions. We do not think it will be denied, for instance, that by far the most success- ful recruiting campaigns during the first and second years of the war in this district were those controlled and engineered by the Shropshire, Denbighshire and Montgomery- shire Territorial Associations, who knew the local needs and were consequently able to bring home more intimately and directly to potential soldiers in those counties the need for their services than any central appeal from London could have done. Lord Derby, indeed, frankly says that he thinks Lord Kitchener would have been wiser to use the machinery of the Territorial Asso- ciations to build up his Now Armies, and the present War Secretary is giving earnest of his belief in this fact by inviting them to assist in developing the Volunteer Force. This should finally dispel the disconcerting fears concerning their rumoured abolition. The County Associations have done far too valuable work to be allowed to disappear, especially at a time when the nation is be- ginning to realise more fully than ever the truth of Lord French's well-deserved tribute that the Teritorial Force saved the situation in 1914, and, we might add, have gone on helping to save it ever since. I Educational Embroideries. One indirect advantage of the pinch of war economy, however irksome its general effect, is that it is forcing our local author- ities very carefully to revise expenditure on certain public services. These services may, as in the case of education, be admirable in themselves, but there is no harm done, and perhaps considerable good, by a re-examin- ation of their Imanct in the light of, the present day necessity to devote our resources to the most eminently practical end, There is probably not a county or a local education authority in North Wales which might not with advantage at the present time re- examine iy expenditure in relation to actual practical results. For never, we believe, was more money being spent on public edu- cation, elementary &nd secondary, than to- day. Never, certainly, was there a more elaborate system of inspection and examin- ation, with its consequent constant growth of the army of central and local officials. And with what result? That employers of labour and business men complain that never was it more difficult to discover a i junior clerk or an apprentice who bore I evidence of much grounding even in the essentials of such instruction as is neces- sary to fit them for the rough and tumble I of every day business or craftsmanship! We do not blame the teachers, who are no idoubt doing the best with the resources at their disposal. Yet there it ,:5; end L is a fact which may most wisely be frankly and courageously faced. We are not amongst those who, looking at this discouraging con- dition, declare that all public expenditure on education is waste. To starve the essen- tials of education, even in war time, would be a fatal national blunder. But we do certainly think that the worst form even semi-Starvation of essentials could take would be the diversion from them of an undue amount of our necessarily limited resources to maintain what we may appro- priately call the mere "embroideries" of our educational system. And that is, we fear, a danger against which our education authorities need to be especially on their guard nowadays. The Jury System. Mr. Justice Atkin repeated at Denbigh- shire Assizes, last week, the expression of regret he recently uttered in Montgomery- shire at the suggested abolition, at least for the duration of the war, of the grand jury. Historic symbolism dies uncommonly hard in the legal profession, however obsolete it may be; but we gather that his lordship regards the functions of the grand jury as something more than a survival of an age when public faith in the judiciary was not as great as it is to-day. But, in any case, it is a question on which legal opinion is somewhat sharply divided, and, as a com- promise, it has been proposed in one quarter that, in order to save the time of public men, and yet not altogether to abandone a time-honoured function of local administra- tion of justice, it should be left to those who are arraigned for trial to ask for the protection of a grand jury if they desire it. We doubt, however, whether the system would long survive this conditional lease of extended life. Probably most people would have sufficient confidence in the character- istic spirit of impartiality which prevails among his Majesty's judges and chairmen of quarter sessions to see that they receive the fairplay accorded by British criminal jurisprudence to the prisoner at the bar. Indeed, it is a moot point how far the jury system altogether is a help instead of a hindrance to the course of justice, especi- ally in certain Welsh counties, where capri- cious conduct in the petty jury box is notor- ious. At any rate, we imagine that, if the grand jury disappears, the not less busy men accustomed to be summoned to serve as petty jurors would witness the simul- taneous extinction of their particular privileges with the utmost equanimity S

10Oswestry Farm Labourers Death

10" Oswestry Farm Labourer's Death. An inquest was held by Dr. Aylmer Lewis, coroner, at Brogyntyn Home Farm, on Friday, on the "body of Thomas Howell (52), of Pen- rhos Farm, the Racecourse, labourer at Bro- gyntn Home Farm, and Caroline Howell, the widow, identified the body, and said her hus- band left home at 7 a.m. on Thursday morn- ing in his usual health, and made no complaint of feeling unwell. He had been suffering from a cold in the head for a week or so, but he had not had any illness or seen a doctor for quite 16 years.—Elsie Woof, of the Home Farm, said that between 7.15 and 7.30 a.m. on Thursday she was, going into the barn and found deceased lying face downwards on the floor. There was nothing in the position in which he was lying to lead her to think there had been any struggle. He was fully dressed. Assistance was forthcoming, and they turned him over, raised his head and unfastened his collar; he gave one gasp and then died.— John Thomas Howell, son of deceased and wagoner at the Home Farm, gave corrobor ative ev' idence.-The. jury,. of which Mr. Geo. Ellis was foreman, returned a verdict of death from natural causes. j

II i PORTHYWARN

II PORTHYWARN. THE SCHOOL.—The children are renting j a piece of ground to grow potatoes and. vege- tables during war time. The result of the re- cent religious knowledge examination was the mark Excellent" in each section, and manv certificates were awarded. The school child- ren have forwarded through the Vicar of Llanyblodwel 13s. 6d. to the Ardmillan motor ambulance fund. LLANYBLODWEL. THE SCHOOL.-The children have contri. buted, through the Vicar, the Rev. J. Allen Jones, 14s. to the motor ambulance fund which fciip Major of Oswe tij s endeavouring to pro- cure for the Ardmillan hospital.

No title

The" Bettisfield camp party gave a successful concert at Cockshutt on Friday in aid of the fund for providing local soldiers with suitable gifts. On Friday and Saturday our airmen des- troyed six enemy machines and forced one damaged to land. Two of our machines are missing. Since January 23 nine German aeroplanes have fallen in our lines. The Vicar of Morton and Mrs. Garnett- Botfield'entertaiiied the 'church choir to tea on Saturday, and Mr. Ellison, in returning thanks for the hcapitaHty, said, they were also ¡' indebted to the Vicar for the gift of a foot- ?ball and the use of the Vicarage field for re- creation purposes.

I PERSONAL

I PERSONAL. I Mr. H. N. Gladstone is now going on very satisfactorily. Lord Herbert Vane-Tempest has arrived in I London from Plas Machynlleth. In an interval from war work in France, Sir Frank and Lady Benson-paid a short visit re- cently to the Misses Howell, at Rhiewport., Welshpool. The Ven. Archdeacon Grimaldi Davis, D.D., i was inducted to, the living of Llandrinio on j Monday, by the Rural Dean of Pool, the: Rev. H. G., Dickinson, vicar of Llandysilio. Lienr.-General Sir Francis Lloyd was arlicngst, those present at a memorial service held yesterday week, at St. Columba's church, Pont-street, London, for the Duke of Atholl, The marriage arranged between Captain Viscount Ebrington, Dragoons, nephew of Lord Harlech, and the Hon. Margaret Beau- mont will take place next week at St. Peter's, Eaton-square. The King has been pleased to give orders for the promotion of General Sir William Robert Robertson, K.C.B., K.C.V.O., D.S.O., Colonel 2nd Dragoons, son-in-law of the late Lieut.-General T. C. Palin, Gresford, to be I G. C. B. for services rendered in connection with the war. I The Hon. Lady Lloyd Mostyn and Mies Rhona Mostyn were among those present at the marriage of Mr. Ian Leslie Orr .Ew :ng, Scots Guards, eldest son of the late Mr. Chas. Lindsay Orr-Ewing, M.P., of Dunskey, Port- patrick, and Miss Helen Bridget Gibbs, daugh- ter of the late Hon. Henry Lloyd Gibbs; and Mrs. Gibbs, of 10, Lennox-gardens, S. W. at St. Peter's, Eaton-square, on Wednesday. ¡ Captain Austin Jones, Royal Artillery, who j received the Military Cross at Buckingham Palace on Wednesday, is a son of the late Rev. Thomas Jones, rector of Hope. Wrex- ham. In peace time Captain Austin Jones was a well-known barrister on the North Wales circuit, and he gained. considerable notoriety as the Unionist candidate who opposed the pre- sent Prime Minister in his stronghold at Car- narvon. The marriage took place at St. Mary's, Vincent-square, London, S., last week. the Ven, Archdeacon of Sheffield Officiating, of the Rev. William James Gravell, C.F., and Miss Edith Winifred Jones, daughter of the late Canon Jones of Burnside, and Mrs. Jones, Wold House, Hawarden. Captain Gravell was a chaplain at Park Hall Camp before leav- ing for similar work in France, and was edu- | cated at Oswestry Grammar School. Countess Helena Gleichen (first cousin of Lord Harlech), who for a whole year has been in charge of the British X-ray unit of the British Red Cross on the Italian front, has left for her first leave. She was given a hearty send-off by the Italian troops and her British colleagues, and the army authorities wrote her a letter expressing the highest praise for the services rendered, by her unit. Countess Gleichen has given many proofs of her per- I sonal courage, for which she has received a I decoration. Colonel Robert Jones, F.R.C.S., R.A.M.C., whom the King has appointed to be an addi- tional member of the Military Division of the Third Class or Companion of the Most Hon- ourable Order of the Bath for services ren- dered in connection with the war, occupies the position of War Office Director of Ortho- paedics for the whole country. Colonel Jones is hon. surgeon to the hospital for children at Baschnrch founded by Miss Hunt. Son of Robert Jones and Mary Hughes, he was born in Rhylin 1858, and married Susie, the daugh- ter of William Evans of Liverpool. Lord Dynevor, who has obtained the King's permission to alter his name to Rhys, can claim descent from one of King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table. One of that knight's descendants, the 15th century Sir Rhys ap Thomas, is believed to have slain Richard the Third at the battle of Bosworth, and to have shared, with Sir William Stanley the spoils of Richard's tent. Lord Dvnevor succeeded to the title five years ago. He married the eldest daughter of the Earl of Jersey. His sister Nest married in 1896 Sir James Reginald Lea Rankin, Bart., brother of Mrs. C. F. K. Mainwaring of Oteley. The King has been graciously pleased te approve of the promotion to Lieut.-General of Major- General Sir Francis Lloyd, K.C.B., C.V.O., D.S.O., Colonel Royal Inniskillitig Fusiliers, commanding the London district, with effect from January 1st inclusive, in re- cognition of valuable services gendered in can- nectoin with the war. Sir Francis has well- earned his promotion. His energy and enthu- siasm throughout the war have been tremen- dous. It was he who made the first move in connection with the drink restrictions, in ducing the Chief Commissioner of Police to persuade the licensing authority to order the earlier closing of public houses. He was also the first to attack the practice of "treating," while his dramatic order to. raid and close down a London evening paper was a mere in- cident in his varied activities. It is more than forty-two years since Sir Francis joined the Grenadier Guards. With them he saw a great deal of active service in Egypt. He was wounded in the Boer War-so badly that his soldiering days were nearly ended.

I I v i I r Local Will i

I I v I. !r., Local Will. The Hon. Essex Mostyn, of 73, Westbourne- terraee, Hyde Park, London, who died on the 21st October, aged 82 years, third daughter of the second Baron Mostyn, and aunt, of the present Lord Mostyn, left unsettled, estate of the gross value of EIS,991 Os. 10d., of which £ 18.847 14s. lOd. is net personalty. I

No title

The total casualties in the London munition works disaster are officially stated to be 69 killed and 400 injured (72 seriously). A fire, nearly a mile in length, occurred. dur- ing the week-end on Chobham Common, be- tween Woking and Chertsey. Hundreds of trees were burned. It is believed that the fire was started by gipsies. The Kaiser's birthday was celebrated on Saturday in an Essex town by the sale of lelies from a Zeppelin brought down in the neigh- bourhood last Septeniber. The proceeds were for the Red Cross Fund. General Sir Francis Lloyd, commanding the London District, attended the unveiling cere- mony of a war shrine, bearing over 200 names, at Bemerton-street, West Islington, on Thurs- day afternoon.