Collection Title: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
9 articles on this page
CORRESPONDENCE

CORRESPONDENCE. t-Wi'z* goir wocilss.LitiLT BRAILB THS OPIXI0N8 RXPHSBM Bl'wiiniBB IN TH11 COLCMM.j, THE TEACHING OF WEELSH. Slit,-As a Welshman and a lover of Wales, and one who ardently desires the advancement --i his people, I beg to differ from your cor- respondent, John Jones. I travel throughout North Wales, and after years of sympathet-M observation, have come to the conclusion that the Welsh language, apart from its problematical value as a survival of Ancient Britain, is in its cultivation a.nd every-day use amongst the masses of the people a distinct source of detriment rather than advantage, rendering our people in many cases servants and serfs to English em- oloyors. like Gurth the Saxon Swineherd in the days of Ivajihoe. In many cases so-called "Welsh" aa spoken is a clumsy jargon. Only yesterday a friend to whom I was speaking in Carnarvonshire was reviling the inferior dialect and pronunciation in Merionethshire. When in Souifh Wales or in Merioneth eflt ire, the other fellow is equally mocked. A gentleman whose daughter attends a county school where Welsh is taught was complaining to me recently that she came home at times with Welsh names of flowers and other things, which he and other Welshmen could not understand, they being un- consaiouly accustomed to describe them in cor- rupted Engliah. As a language for, every-day use, it is often cultivated after school-days to the exclusion of English, with the result that in many instances our people, with probably brilliant natural ability, latent and undeveloped, remain labourers all their lives. I am familiar with the argument that a knowledge of two languages enables the possessor to acquire a third more readily. This is all very well for college students, who represent a small decimal percentage of the population, the great bulk of whom do not ac- quire one language decently. A pastor of two Welsh chapel s whom I met in the train recently stated, with a smile of satis- faction, that out of 250 members in hM chapels, not more than 10 could follow an English con- versation intolligentlv. Shameful! I find that Woteh Sunday school scholars, even ministers' children, are frequently moat superficial in their knowledge of Scripture, and would not stand a ghost of a chance in a Scriptural examination with English Sunday school scholars, the ex- iDlanation being that the corrupted vehicle of expression, the pigeon-English to which, in deference to parental compulsion, they devofte their divided attention on the Sabbath after- noon, and proceed to neglect until the follow- ing Sabbath, does not contain the resources of literature and master-minds which the English volumes on their book-shelves possess, and upon which practically every Welsh preaching min- ister, who keeps a/breast of his vocation, is al- most wholly dependent. I have had a good deal to do with social work. It is often impossible to obtain permanent co- operation between English and Welsh. If '"he former st&rt a beneficial movement for the good of the community as a whole, the latter may co-operate for a time but ultimately split off, on the ground that they are "having one in the WelM," creating unneoessary expense, duality of administration, sub-division and embitterment, the cause often being the hankering of indi- vidual mediocrities for personal exaltation, who wouw under ordinary eircumataiicas stand noit a ghost of an opportunity for distinction on ihbeir mental merits or attainments. The only purpose of language (that is' to say a ooSeetion of words) is to provide a vehicle to enable us mutually to communicate out thoughts, ■wants, and deairos of our neighbours. In a .cmall island- like ours, there is surely no need for duality of vehicle. "Anything which ob- structs or renders less easy such free and gen- eral comm micsattion is ultimately a cursq rather than a blessing. Welshmen oirten quote Lloyd George and William Hughes of Australia as examples of what Welshmen can. do. So they can, when, as in their oases they learn English, with its wonderful melody, potentiality and world-dnSuenoo. If they had respectfully stop- ped in lAanjstumdwy and Llanaanfcffraid, tub- thumping in tha blacksmith's shop or on the river bridge, aa is so often the case in rural Wales, how different their st-ories would have been. A tutor in a We]Ah collegiate school stated that bettar-claas Welsh parents, who, with their tongues in tfheii oheefca, advocated Welsh, often pave strict; private that their child- ren must not be taught Welsh, as they wished them to grow up with a broader outlook and a decent accent, rather than that they should be handicapped through life with accentual disa- bility which Lloyd George has overcome and William Hughes has dropped altogether. A Welshgentleman residing in a Welsh University town i_ ncidentally remarked to me that his eon was being educated at Shrewsbury SohooL I remonstrated with him, seeing that he resided in a Mecca of education- yes, he remarked, they teach everything in our, local schools ex- C8pt In sending him to Shrewsbury, I desfre him to loam everything including man- nersn. M high time, in the interests of the children, who are, t-hrougb, gtupid gcfttimetit, often handicapped throughout life, that the trutih should bo told.-I am, etc., OmaAEG. June 28, 1917. MINERAL WEALTH OF DEE VALLEY' SlB,—It ia most interest-ing to find at last that efforts are being made to get at some of tihe waaltpi that exists, seen and imseen, in (foe beautiful vallerv by the Dee. It is a, wonder, and indeed a sin, that such should have been 80 long neglected, and it is to be hoped that now another effoirt is to be n1.IK\ It is a wo  der, no anIoon tf xegff o wt a s to be ma d e, the powers tihat be will not rest until every obstacle likely to retard the progress of such a laudable undertaking fit removed. That there exists in the neigjh bourhood wealth of nearly every kind to be found in the immediate vicinity of Llangollen is beyond doubt, and it wntl be perhaps new, to many to learn that ooal of exoeftiient quality is to be found witihan Iers than a mile of Llangollen Bridge, and that within less than five miles there cam be found, evidence of the existence of the continuation of the well- known Minena vein. What is past understanding to me as tt the weaAlib that actually etaree one in the fiaoe is not made use of. The whole distriot is full of poten- tial wealth waiting and practically asking to be uaed for the benefit of the district; but somehow, errery obstacle that human mature has been able to devise has been made use of to prevent its deT?topment. It ia, mdeo?, a wonder to me, and to many (ieivt in4ee*d, e &nd the splendid that 0+-hors?, 4rcih exists in the dŒmot lhøïe been iJJ4?? to be left as it is* From the Bridge at Llangollen can be seen north and south. miAhoms of stone of l.Miteriail equad to any that can bo found in the T' nited Kingdom for the manufacture of oement, nnd thss wimin an eaeier readfa of both water and viiii carriage than a good many plaoes waiere I kiiow similar material is used to the general I"' "efit of all .ooncemed. 'Aom?how or other, it is haa-d to arrive at the ? ?i?!i?da,b:(?n of the o6stmction. Both the district i1 d the country has )had to 8U,ffer,nd why this M. bom alto wed! M & mystery that I for one t?rmot fa&.om, It is not because jttt?hh I are no mn ?n the &atriot who u4d6mtand iihin?, the town and the district con 'men a? aMe a? a.ny that we to be found in any o&,w p&rt of the oountry. « The amount of money spent in former years for the cement we wanted in the country was very areat; &tJJ, rather than utilise our own L"rty-J wealth we thought it better to go to Stettin amd other foreign countries few these commodities. As for the ooaJ: that may be found, it is beyond doubt that both in the valley as well as on tlhe other side of the hill in the Oeiriog vale evidence may be found that ooal exists in abundance within easy reach, the "dip" of both being favourable for working. Silica &ga?n is plent1ful in the neighbourhood; Si-lica, one Sfm alone are thanke due for the exploitation of the Silica briok, the finest in the wihole country, and one that will stand1 a greater heat Lhae any in the country. Very few places afre so situated as the old i town is. On the one hand, there. are tpansport ) facilities that are equal to any to be found else- j where; furthermore, thei-e is a means of transit I that many towns that l flourish have not, i.e., an exoellent water carriage in the shape of a canal, whidb enables any description of mer- chandise to reach the point of use cheaply and regularly. It is however hoped that this time matters will mature, and that those who are in a position to assist will do all tilwy can to break down barriers that prevents the district from utilising its natural wealth. The time is inopportune to say .one word in favour of developing the slate industry. Tthiis, I am afraid, will have to stand1 for some years, I btji w!hy not use the means at hand to make the best of matters with other things 7-1 am, etc., I SEMPER IDEM. I 1

RHOSLLANE RCHRUGOG

RHOSLLANE RCHRUGOG. ORDINATTON.-The Rev. 0. Lloyd WiibM-is, pastor of Bethel Ghapel, Ponkev, wss ordained, at the annual meeting of the Calvanistlo Metho- dists at Holyhead last week. l A CAfA,The Rev. R. G. Roberts, paster of Moriali Churdh, Ponkey. and Siloh Ohttreh, Johnstown, has rcoeived a call to the pastorate of Llandderfel Calvariistic Methodist C3iur«sh. PFALSONAL.-Mr. F,. Emlyn Davies, P.R.C.O. who was recently appointed organist of West-J minster Chapel, London, is at home for a holiday, prior to staff tang on his new duties. PRESENTATION. Pte. James Jones, Bridge-street, Penycae, was home on leave la.st. wftek before proceeding to France. On Sundav he was presented with a; Bible by his Sunday School Class at Salem Church. ACXSDBNT.?Whiisit following his occupation at tihe V&uxh?H CoH"e

ONE LLANGOLLEN FACT OUTWEIGHS 1000 FOREIGN ICLAIMS

ONE LLANGOLLEN FACT OUTWEIGHS 1,000 FOREIGN CLAIMS. The liatijfoEen woman who state* the follow- ing faot, tails more by her experience than a tfnouaand unsupported foreign claims. And FACTS are wihat Llangollen people want, facts that can be verified. Judge this one for yourself. On January 16th, 1911, Mrs. 14. A. Jonee, [ of Penfeedw CoUaffe, Birch Hill, Llangollen, said■" My back was very bad for a long time. SHARP pams used to strike right across my kid- ney. every time I..bent down, and sometdmea I cculd scarcely inamage to straighten myself ain. I had rhswnatiem in my ?egs, whidh sweMed up at Hinee and were very pMnfuh I always felt tired and weary. The water showed signs of kidney disorder, and my eyes were puffed. I got a supply of Doant badmehe kidney pills, which I AM pleased to say helped me from the first. They soon, took away the pains from my back, and after I had .given them a fair trial ,1 felt better and BRIGHTER altogether. I am ffrateful for the benefit I have received from Doan » PIHSI and I often recommend this medi- ei,ne. "gued), M. A. Jones. On December 22*4. 1915—NEARLY FIVE YEARS T,ATER- r& Jones skid-- "Only on taking a cold does my back ever trouble me, but as I still kegp to Dean's pills I have. nothing to complain Backache, gravel, dropsical swellings, urinary disorders, rheumatic twinjres, headaches and dizzy spells are enough cause to suspect kidney dieeaae. Doan's backache kidney pills are solely for THE kidneys and bladder, and allbrd health and SKRMGTIX thousands. OI all dealers, or la. 9d. a BOX, from Foster- McClellan Co., W.n. Street, Oxford Street. London. W. Don't ask for backache or kidnay pills -ask DISTINCTLY for DOAN'S backache kid- ney PUKW AS Mm. Jones had.

LLANGOLLEN COUNTY I SCHOOLS I I

LLANGOLLEN COUNTY I SCHOOLS. A meeting, of the Governors of tibese Schools Over by Mirs. Mahler-was held in the SChool BUll dings on Tuesday evening, when there were present: Messrs Jamea Jarling-ton, H. Birch, E. D. Jones W. P. Williams, ;i,nzl Mre S. Roberts, with the headmaster (Mr. H. R. B.A.), and the clerk (Mr. E. Fouikes J< nes) CHAIRMAN AND YICE-CHAIRMAN. On the proposition of Mr. W. P. Wrhains, seconded by Mr. H. Biroh, the Rev. F, Fctikes waa elected 4:8 chairman of the Governing Body for thte enffiiiang twelve months a-nd, on the j proposition of the Rev. W. Foulkes, snded Ly i Mr. E. D. Jam, Mr. H Birdh WI s ei-rcipd- vio&-cihaiirman. The Rev. W. Foulktsg proposed a vote of thanks to Mffs. Mahler for ler services 1 in the ohair during tihe year and this was second- ed Mr. Roberts and earned nem coin. I GOVERNORS AND COUNTY SCHOOL. After the lists of the attendances made by members of the Governing Body at ordinary and speoi al meetings had been read, Mr. 11. Bircili said that he would like those of the Mommeea of t3le County Council to be read aga;iti- and this was done, the record of these members being unusually low. Mr. Birch staid thiat lite ihad asked for these returns in view of the fact that the County Authority had charged the local ai-id mism?Lzi-,t,,ging the Governors wi_ th neglecting- and xmsmanag-ing the busmeaa of tbe schools, and in ordJer that the public m?ht know how the County attended to it.-The Chairm&n: Things would not be so comfortable as they are here if someone was not looking after them mucih better than 'he Y are looked after by tihe County.—Mr. Jame Darling- ton (& Countv nominee) said that h? h&d tendered  hisre5&tion as a Governor and he would be very pleased to make way for someone eJs. ir. felt it difficult to hear at tb?D County Authorik?, references made to what waa termed the extra* ordinary n?giect stated to be taking p'joce among the Llangollen Governor. amd! at the l&st meeting had protested against the language that was bsmg used. He would be pleased if t'hey would withdraw his name; and they would then not have to forgive him agaim for not more rog'lllla.rly attending: the meetings.—Tfrie Clerk said he did not think that the (??trnors had the rit to accept the resignation, the authority to do so was that which appointed Mr. Darlington.—Mir W. P. Williams said that he hoped Mr. Darling- ton would re-consider his position. He thought that tihe County Council werre. totally wrong. They did not know the circumstances and he couid not understand any sane man speaking in the way that some of the members Jmd spoken at the last meeting. They were merely actuated by spite end bad spirit, and a time would come when tihev would oe effectually taken to book for all this.—Mrs. Mahler said that he wouk1 like to joiÍn her protest to those of the other members against what had been said git the County Council, and to express the hope that Mr. Darlington would m-oonsider' his position. He was of the greatest value to the Sdhpol and had always stuck up for it most effeçÜvely. His Eenioos were far too va.]uahle tp be lost to the cause of education in the countv. — Mr. J&mes Darlington said tihat he 

No title

One hundred thousand persons have signed petitions requesting the Australian Federal K>vernment to prohibit treating. Mr. Hughes has promised to consult the Cabinet on the matter. The escape is now reported of three of the crew of the Zeppelin brought down in East Anglia recently. One man escaped by jump- I ing from the gondola, while the others were rescued by a village policeman.

Llangollen County School

Llangollen County School. RESULT OF EXAMINATION FOR TIHJ JUNE SCHOLARSHIPS. At a meeting of the Oovwnora fill. TJfcttgoitai County Schools on Tuesday, the Desalt of the JtaKi entrance Echolembip exaonlinatm was sobpUt'tcA. Tihe scholarships, competed for by 48 oxnadute% are four in number, eaoh of the vaaw of £ 6. Tb"ft is aliso an interne! icbolaimhdp to fc. Lettaome, Chaa, Bfirtbey, amd Bdhraadv, M»t cilia, Garth Council, 297. 6. I.obeirts, Thos. E. Lloyd. I/i*rt#olien omneol SW< 7. Lydon, Catherine PitegeraM, USSOCO& JfatloDiii, 286. 8. LloydI, El-sie, Ohiri CWrls, 678. 9. Rogers, Seth, Chiiik Boys, 374. 10. DavtLeE, Korab, Llangoltan Katiedai, gM. 11. Arduar, Euraetsfc Oven G., OeSn Cenmoii, W4. 12, Roberts, John Edkr&rd, L- ZTational, 13. Powell, Doreen EUz., Ohiii4 Gm11I. S63. 14. Humphirieys, John B., Garth Council, 362. 15. Briisooe, Jessie., Chirk Girls, 268. 16. Davies, J'obn Llew,, Pastoe Jfaftdonal, BSOi 17. Charlton, Muriel Ids A., LlangolleB Xatioeal^ S40. 14. KyfRn, Ada, Llangollen 00=Wit, 2SS. 19. Morgan, Arthur Giyin, LlJien OsanflR, 9ft, 30, Kelshaw, BAymoB» 40. Wlliliams. Magfltl, Garth OtnmcsH. ltg. 41. -A-%eat SydneT,, Ptutft, IM. • 43. Jones, Airtihur EHfe, Gartto Ommr-41, 90, 43. Barriali^, Dorcas, Peetee, 74. 44. WilMams, AIBCJMMJIW, FAOTEE, 71. Jones, Da-fyddi Jenkins, HaBeoIIen OoaJsaSj WJfc. llanjs, Davis, Garth Comag; Pai»7 '.T028 Jones, Joton Giyav Uar^ofteii Coun«U •„ Jou*^ Gerttpade Maude, Llongollm CotiEasI; Gjraml Wyane, Gartih Cossaoil, afos#ni =.

THE CHURCHES

THE CHURCHES. The Rev. Wilfead Gnffitfca, úhirk, ha* be8 appointed curate in & of -A-I sai"-te C:hlmcii. Soutlisea. The Rer, D. R" OBa.ptU.t miBist?r of Zion Chape!x Cdfn ?wr. B-u?boa. "ed a caM to rHe pa.etor? ? the .'CtjrS?.. Di?net Church. Ll«o.i?o|Ian.. aC, ?n?rch Bi$hóp of Here&K who it 85 y

Flintshire and Denbighshire

Flintshire and Denbighshire. MOVE TO SAVE A PARLIAMENTARY SEAT. At a meeting of the Flint Boroughs Liberal V Association, held at Mold, the REPRESENTATION of the People pill, AS it affects ti1. ti of Flint and Denbigh, came under eonsideration, It was explained that under the Bill only three Parliamentary representatives are allowed ITER the two counties, instead of five as SI PRESENT. It was unanimously resolved that THE Flint- shire and Denbighshire Unionist and Liberal Associations be invited to co-operate in an endeavour to seonre four Parllaaaonrtatf repre- sentatives for the two counties numbly, two county representatives for Deubishslkire AN4 two representatives for Flintshire (ene county and one borough). ——

Dartmoor Shepherd Again

Dartmoor Shepherd Again. T? DM?m?y Sb*phmd. Da 3Bbwiat fffif. of LlÐ. WM NOmteaoe? tg epttflmr impmsonment at Manchestar