Collection Title: North Wales Chronicle and Advertiser for the Principality

Provider: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 6 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
30 articles on this page
Advertising

M 4 FOUR BATTLES RAGING. Gallant Resistance by British Troops.  GERMANS IN FULL RETREAT IN EAST PRUSSIA Advance of Russian Legions. SURRENDER OF TOGOLAND TO THE BRITISH. BANGOR. THURSDAY NIGHT. A BUSH AND SILENCE PREVAIL IN ALL THE IHU CAPITALS, WHERE THE PRESS BUREAUX AND CENSOR* ARE RIGIDLY EXERCISING THEIR POWERS AND CURTAILING THE PASSAGE OF FRK.SH NEWS FROM THE RESPECTIVE FRONTS. BIG EVPINTS ARE IN PROGRESS. WYfU A RENEWAL OF THE GREAT BATfLE OPENED LAST SATURDAY UPON NEW LINES OF FIGHTING. INTEREST AT HOME IS STLLL CENTRED ON THE LEFT OF THE ALLIES, IN mE NORTH-EAST CORNER OF FRANCE. WHERE FIGHTING IS IN PROGRESS. 1HJE BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE, UNDER FIELD MARSHAL SIR JOHN FRENCH, OCCUPIES POSITIONS HERE WHICII MAY NOT UNLIKELY BE THE CENTRE OF THE HOTTEST CONFLICT. IN A DISTRICT SOMEWHERE BETWEEN iMAUBEUGE AND DOUAI. THE GERMANS HAVE DELAYED THEIR ADVANCE LONGER THAN WAS EX- tfECTED, AND LONG ENOUGH, IT IS UNDERSTOOD, TO ENABLE THE ALLIES TO CET SECURELY LOCATED IN THEIR NEW DEFENSIVE POSITIONS, AND TO EFFECT A CONCENTRATION OF TROOPS DESIRABLE IN VIEW OF THE APPAR- ENT ATTEMPTED MOVEMENT OF THE GERMANS TO TURN THE ALLIES* EX- TREME LEFT, AND, IF POSSIBLE, TO CUT OFF OUR PRESENT LINE OF COM- MUNICATIONS WITH BOULOGNE. NEWS REACHING THIS COUNTRY FROM DUTCH SOURCES MUST CONTINUE JPCI BE ACCEPTED WITH ALL RESERVE, AND SO CLASSED MUST BE THE REPORT THAT THE GERMANS ARE ATTEMPTING TO CAPTURE ANTWERP. NOTHING MILL BE ALLOWED AT PRESENT TO WEAKEN THEIR MAIN OBJECTIVE, (WHICH IS TO BREAK AWAY IN THE DIRECTION OF PARIS, THROUGH THE LONG LINE HELD BY THE ALLIES, BEHIND THE rRENCH FRONTIER. ALL OTHER MOVEMENTS IN THE WAR-FIELD MAY BE DISREGARDED FOR ffn MOMENT IN WATCHING THE ISSUES OF THE TREMENDOUS BATTLE HERE ENGAGED, AND FOR THESE ISSUES IN THEIR FINAL PRESENTABLE SHAPE WE (WILL HAVE TO WAIT SOME DAYS. THE FRENCH OFFENSIVE MOVE PROGRESSES BETWEEN NANCY AND THE iTOSOSL IN THIS REGION FOR THREE DAYS BLOODY BATTLES HAVE BEEN RAGING (AND APPEAR TO HAVE GONE IN FAVOUR OF THE FRENCH IN THE NORTH THE FRENCH AND ENGLISH LINES HAVE BEEN MOVED 0ACK A SHORT DISTANCE. THE CENSOR DAMAGED THIS MESSAGE. AN ATTEMPT BY GERMAN CAVALRY TO RAID THE BRITISH COMMUNICA- jIIONS HAS BEEN REPULSED. THERE IS AN UNCONFIRMED REPORT TO THE EFFECT THAT THE GERMANS SAVE ENTERED LILLE. TOURNAY, AND VALENCIENNES WITHOUT OPPOSITION THE RUSSIAN ADVANCE CONTINUES UNCHECKED, AND FURTHER IMPOR- TANT PROGRESS IN EASTERN PRUSSIA AGAJLNST THE GERMANS IS REPORTED. WTIlI THE ARCHANGEL ROUTE OPEN. RUSSIA OFFERS TO ENGLAND HER WIRE GERMAN TRADE. cs W'86 officially announced list night by the Presa Bureau that on Tuesday the French on the southern part of the Franco- German frontier were attacked in force by the Germane; that the attack was repulsed, aad that the enemy retired ail along the lioau iltis satisfactory aa far as it, goes, is the most definite of any that has boon given as to the happenings in tho Western theatre of war since the rotireme-nt of the Allies to thetr new positions. J.n earlier communication from Paris an- nounces that, oa the Fjl. of the Meuse, the French troops have regained their positions, commanding the openings of the great forest of Ardennes; and that more to the right the French have vigorously assumed the offensive r-nd driven bac-k the enemy. though pursuit has been stayed to re- establish the troops on the lines assigned In Lorraine, it L- declared, both Armies have taken the fteusivo at the same time and the battle, Iwgun CIl Tuesday, still continued. t.1 the North, tin parties of German cavalry which Oil Monday were teeu in tho region, of Lille, Roubaix, and Tiureotng, appearod on around BOHai, whidt i nearly twenty rnik'fc due .south of Lille. The Allied troops huve been reinforced on that wing. Jteferrutg to the battlp of the week-end, the French bulletin states that despite tho enor- mous fatigue of three consecutive days' fight ing. and despite the lo.sscs sustained, the moral of the troops is excellent. fj the encounter with the Pruarimn Guard, which *«•! especially fierce. Prince Adalbert, the :mde- of the German Emperor, was killed; and, according to the Berlin Semi- official Sews Agency. Prince Friedrich of Saxe-Mcinigeu wa» killed at Namur on the I 23rd iiist. by a shell. fiLocorditrig to the reports of fugitivcw who have arrived from Mons the British forocs, bc- tween Saturday and Monday, met and re- paired luriouci attacks mado hy ioii" separate German column*. ftfr Asquith stated in the of Commons that no list of ca«ualtie.> was yet available, it would be "cruel and inexpedient to issue an imperfect list." IlJie Belgian Legation in London has recoived news that on Monday the Belgian troops sallied from Antwerp, and on the following day drove back three German divisions which had taken up a cit-and near Malines. Witit regard to the Eastern theatre of war important news has Ix-on received from the Russian Chief of the General Staff The German Army in East Prussia is in retreat and is entrenching itself near tho fortress of Konigsberg. The Russian troops have occupied tho impor- tant railway oeutre, Insterburg. and the town of Angerburg, w hich is some forty miles further bOnta. On the 23rd and 2 k.. fierce battles weia fought to tho north of Nokteuburg, which is on the frontier, about ninety miles due south of Konigsberg (The 20Ui Corps of tho German Army. in- creased to three was occupying fortified positions, in which it was attacked and sitrrounderl the left wltog flying to Gsterode, and abandoning guns and material. It was announced yesterday that Togo- | land, the German Colony on tho West Coast of Africa, had been surrendered uncondi- tionally to the British invading.rforeo. which ia to enter Kamina., the capital, to-dlj. The Germans have destroyed their wire- leas station. Of the progress of affairs at Kiao-Chau, which is now blockaded by the Japanese, no further news has been received by the » Japanese Embassy in Loudon. Newts has been received there that tho Japanese Am- baasador in Vic-una has been handed his passports. Recruiting is going on briskly. While the Now Army of 100,000 men is practically complete, more recruits are still wanted. As Mr Asquith said in the House yesterday, "We want all the recruits we can get." President of the County of London Terri- torial Association, Lord rusher has issued an appeal to the young men of London "to give to the King 30,000 Territorials in a few days," so that a .second unit may be raised in reserve for every one that has volun- teered for service abroad. Panada's first Expeditionary Force is expected to be fully assembled at the end of this week. It is sufficiently over strength to supply a substantial nucleus for a.ny second forco that may be required- From the German official war news dated yesterday it appears that Namur has not completely fallen, but only the town and five of the forts, four otters being still sub- jected to bombardment. The German Emperor has sent a telegram to the Crown Princess rejoicing in "Wil- lielm's" first victory, and aanounoimtg the bestowal on him of tho Iron Cros& of the first and second class. Austrian succeeoos against the Russians are reported. although a temporary retreat" of the German troops in East Prussia is admitted. With regurd to the fighting in Belgium, it is declared that an English cavalry brigade was repulsed at Maubeuge, and that an infantry division was also defeated. No further particulars a.re given. The Prince of Wales' National Relief Fund this afternoon reached the total of ^1.780,000. The Prime Minister, in the Hou.e of Com- mons on Tuesday, said that Sir John French reported that tho difficult operation of withdrawing to a new position had been successfully carried out, that the troops were unshaken by the hard pressure to which they had boon subjected during their retirement, and that all were in the best, of spirits. Heir losses have been considerable. They are estimated by the Field-Marshal in com- mand at over 2000. No details have as yet been received. The Allies in Belgium are meeting the full shock of the German Army. It is essential for Germany that she should deal a para- lysing blow in this quarter in order to gain time to detach troops to resist the Russian attack oil the Prussian frontier. But the Russians have moved quickly upon the German Army Corps which were de- tailed to hold them in East Prussia. The resistance of three of these Corps has been swept aside, and the completeness of tho Russian victory is clearly due to the con- centration of the Gorman troops against the Allies in Belgium. M Viviani, the French Premier, telegraphed on Sunday to the Russian Commander-in- Chief:— "illis victory is an augury of the- crushing of the tyranny under which you are at present suffering," Cc mmunieation between Japan and China is interrupted, probably owing to the cutting of the ca-blei between Shanghai and Nagaiaaki. Consequently nothing is known in Tokyo about the operations which Japan is understood to have begun against Kiao- chau. though there are vagtio reports that the bombardment of Tsing-tao has begun. Further information from the Servian head- quarters s hows that the defeat of the Austrians on the Drina was as complete as it has been represented to be. The Servians took 4500 prisoners, 53 guns, 114 ammuni- tion wagons, and large quantities of stores and rifles. Au official statement issued in Vienna ad- mits these reverses, but explains them on the ground that it has been necessary to concentrate the main Austrian force upon the north-east frontier to resist the Russian advance. j Ii face of this admission the Government of Austria-Hungary has the supreme effrontery to declare that the Servian campaign muat in future be regarded as "a punitive ex- pedition rather than definite war Ja.pan, having received no reply from Ger- many to her ultimatum, has formally de- clared that a state of war exists between Japan and Germany. Ic is officially announced in Paris that France and Great Britain are to lend Belgium < £ 20,000,000, sharing equally. Great Britain's part in this loan was aamovced last week. Tho Admiralty have issued a warning that German mines have been laid indiscrimi- nately upon the ordinary trade routes in the North Sea,, They desire to impress on British and neutral shipping the vital im- portance of touching at British ports be- fore entering the North Sea, "in order to ascertain according to tho latest informa- tion the routes and channels which the Admiralty aro keeping swept, and along which these dangers to neutrals axe re- duced."

GEKMAN RETREAT1

GEKMAN RETREAT. 1 ADVANCE OF THE RUSSIAN I FORCES. NEW VICTORIES. NEW VICTORIES. i WHOLE OF EAST PRUSSIA SAID TO BE OCCUPIED. Tho Russians are winning against the Ger- rraiVi, and their advanco is now more rapid. Fpcoh victories are announced to-day. The following official telegram was ;SS\!OO by tho Russian Embassy in London to-day, having been received, from tho headquarter staff at St Petersburg :— Ou the Prussian frontier. the German Army is in retreat and entrenching itself near tho fortress of Konigsberg. Russian troops have occupied Insterberg- ard Augersburg. '11100 Press As&oeiation is informed that telegrams of the highest importance have beer received from tho Russian general staff announcing freph victories on the part of the Russian Army, both against Germany and Austria, and showing that the Czar's troops art now in occupation of tho whole of the eastern and southern half of Eastern Prussia. I IMPORTANT DESPATCH. In his telegram the Chief of the Russian General Staff says :— On the Eastern Prussian front the Ger- man army is boating a retreat by forced marches. Part of the Gorman army in its retirement is eoucentrating on the fortress of Konigsberg. The Germans have abandoned, without firing a shot, the position they had pre- viously fortitied on the River Angerapp, which runs through the important railway centre of Insterberg Roads to the west of this river aro strewn with shells, cartridges, and sacks which the enemy has discarded in his retreat. Our troops have occupied Insterberg and Amgerborg, a town fifty kilometre., south of Insterberg On the 23rd and 24th inst. (Sunday and Monday) fierce battles were fought in the region of the north of Neidcn- berg, in the outh-West corner of Eastern Pru.sria, against important German forces, with a ha-ppy result to our arms. In the .4ame region the 20th Corps of the German army. which had been increased to three divisions, was in the occupation of fortified positions at Orlau and Frankenau. On tho ;rJ and 24th inst. our troops forced the German defences, attacked their positions with ha.nd grenades and bayonets, and at eleven in the morning of tho 24th inst. the 2otli German Corps was sur- rounded by its. The enemy's left flank lied to Osterode, on the western limits of Eastern Prussia, abandoning a cannon, machine guns, cais- aons, and pritjoners. Referring to the Russo-Austrian advance, the Chief of the General Staff says:- On the 23rd the Austrian rearguard, assisted by artillery, attompted to check our advance along the river Sereth, in the ie.gian of Tvrnapol and Tchartkow, but after a series of engagements were repulsed, and our offensive continues. We took many waggons, two mitrailleuses and a large quantity of ammunition. To the south of Groubesehove we destroyed a,n Austria.n aeroplane, killing two aviators and wounding a third. Our cavalry has destroyed a bridge near Kaanenk, in Bakovina, and stopped railway coiii m it ii icaticn, fNot.c.Konigsoorg (or Koenigsbcrg) is the capital of East Prussia, and is one of the most important towns in Eastern Germany, being a notajble commercial a.nd industrial centre. It is a first-class fortress, forming, according to tho onicia.) "Gazetteer," one of the most powerful strongholds of the German Empire. Tarnapol is between seventy and eighty miles from Lemberg.] GERMANS EVACUATE EAST PRUSSIA. A Paris message, dated last night, and re- ceived early this morning, says:- A despatch received here from St. Peters- burg declares that the Germans have evacuated Eastern Prussia. A St. Petersburg telegram to the Tribuna states that three German army corps are enveloped by Russian forces who occupy the whole of East Prussia. The Germans are retreating towards Koen- igsburg, and a great Russian army is march- ing towards Posen,

BRITISH TROOPS ENGAGED

BRITISH TROOPS ENGAGED. I GERMAN CRUISER SUNK. BRITISH MARINES AT OSTEND. LONDON, Thursday. In tho House of Commons this afternoon Mr Awquith stated that General French re- ported he was yesterday engaged with superior forces. Our troops fought splen- didly. General French considers the general po&i- tion in impending battle satisfactory. Mr Churchill announced that the British cruiser "Highflyer" has sunk the German cruiser "Kaiser Wilhelm Der Growe," which was armed with ten four-inch guns, off the West Coast of Africa. He also announced that a strong British force of Marines had gone to Ostend and oc- cupied the town and surrounding district without apposition. Mr Churchill added that our casualties on the 'Highflyer" were one man killed and five slightly wounded. Their names had been sent to the Press Bureau.. He said that the survivoto of the "Kaiser Wilholm Der.Grosse" were landed before the ve*jsel sank. The ves- sel was one of the very few armed auxiliary cruisers which had succeeded in getting to sea. The Central News says there were on board the "Kaiser Wilhelm Der Grosse" two Brit- ish army officers who had been taken pri- soner of war by the Ge-rman cruiser from off tho Union Castle steamer "Galacian." The "Kaiser Wilhelm Der Grosse "was a North German Lloyds liner, which, on the outbreak of war was converted into an armed cruiser. She was fourteen thousand tons' displacement, and at one time was the fastest liner in the Atlantic.. She captured the "Galacdan" on August 15th while the British shrp was making for the Canary Islands en route for England from the Cape. The official Press Bureau announces that the casualties on the "Highflyer" were:— Killed: Richard Lobb, leading oarpenter. Crew wounded: Five men, slightly.

ISHROPSHIRE ARTILLERY AT EYTON HOUSE

I SHROPSHIRE ARTILLERY AT EYTON HOUSE. The Shropshire Royal Horse Artillery Battery, with a strength of about 250 of- ficers and men and over 300 houses, marched from Shrewsbury to Eaton Park on Friday and Saturday last. Passing the residence of Mr Frank Lloyd, Eyton House, a halt was made to water and refresh the horses. Mr Lloyd kindly invited the officers and men to partake of re- freshments in hia house andgrou-nds, which was very muab appreciated. Tho officer in com- I mand thanked Mr Lloyd for his kinduces, which I he acknowledged by saying that it gave him and I his family the greatest pleasure to offer hospi- tality to such & fine body of men, and he knew l. others who would like to do the same if they only had the opportunity. He wished them every aucoeas And brilliant victory.

GREAT SERVIAN VICTORY I

GREAT SERVIAN VICTORY I AUSTRIAN ATTEMPT TO INVADE I SERVIA ENDS IN DISASTER. OVER SIXTY GUNS ABANDONED I (Contral Nows Cor respondent.) I NI8AH. Thursday Morning. The following official communiquo has boen issued :— Tho Servian Army is following the Austri- who are in full flight, after having been defeated along tho entire front from 1'scr mountains to tho Jadar Valley It is expected that the Servi-aiiw will initiate a general offensive movement on Sunday. Reports from varioiss ixnirccis prove beyond donbl that the Servians gained a great victory after a battle lasting four days. The Servians by clever strategy wuooeeded in pjivelopirug the hostile forces, estimated at between one hundred and twenty a,ud one hundred and fifty thousand men. Tlte last stages of the battle commenced on August 24th and ended the next morning in the panic-stricken flight of Lite Atistt-lqtns towards tho bridges over the Drina, near Lozinitza. The Servians persued holly, and their artillery at- tempted to cut off .the Austrian retreat by shell- ing bridges. Too fletung Austrians abandoned over sixty cannons (chiefly howitzers), field hospitals, bakeries, the personnel of one regimental band, and enormous masses of other war material. T he Austrian casualties were very heavy, and over two thousand prisoners were taken Ln the last, engagement. An Austrian inajot,, w-ho is among the prison- ers, states than he ca-nnot see how the Servians will stioceed in clearing the field of Atistrian doad. No othor details are yet to hand, but it is quite clear that the Austrian attempt bo invade Servia has ended in complete disaster to the former.

MINES IN NORTH SEA I I

MINES IN NORTH SEA. I DANISH AND NORWEGIAN VESSELS BLOWN UP The Central N",W3 yesteo&day stated that the Norwegian steamer "Gottfried" has been blown up in the North S-r-a, by mines, and eight lives lost. The veswel sank almost im- mediately, and of her crew of twelve the cap- tain, chief mate, a sailor and a fireman were picked up on floating wreckage. The Danish trawler "Skuli Fogeti" hM also been Mown up in the North Sea, four lives being lost. Thirteen of the crew, two of them .JOvorely inj ltrOO, wei-o landed yesterday by th-o North Shields trawler "Lottie Ltesk." Tho mate of tho trawler stated that the mino exploded under the vessel's bows and shattered tlio forecastle, iu which fix men were sleeping. Four of them must have been killed outright. Two otners were dragged out alive, but injured. Tho "Lottie Lesk" picked up the survivors an hour and a half later. (Theee messages are passed, but not con- firmed, by the War Press Bureau.]

IAUSTRIAN BOMBARDMENT OF BELGRADE

AUSTRIAN BOMBARDMENT OF BELGRADE. SERVIAN PROTEST. NISII, Thursday Morning. Tho Servian Government has sent a coni- tnunicai/ion to the neutral powers embodying a protest against the Aualro-Hungarian army's systematic bombardment of Belgrade. The bombardment of the Servian capital is absolutely contrary to resolutions passed at the Hague Con- ference. in which it is dediiitely pointed out that open undefended towns and ports must not bo bombarded. lit spite of thw very clear rule the Austro-Hungarian army has bombarded several Serviantowns along the two rivers which com- pose the Servian northern frontler,an.,d have done great damage to the capital, Belgrade, where there aro very few houses which have not been stricken by shells. Their object in doing this is clear. The Ausfcro-Hung-arian army have failod to oarry out their military plan, and have, therefore, inflicted severe material 1058 on the Servian capital in revenge for that failure.

Advertising

To the Population of This Parish. I RELY CONFIDENTLY ON THE RURAL POP- ULATION, OF ALL GRADES, TO PERFORM ITS SHARE OF THE NATIONAL DUTY AT THIS CRISIS IN OUR HISTORY." KITCHENER.

CARNARVON MAN WOUNDED IN BELGIUM

CARNARVON MAN WOUNDED IN BELGIUM. Our Carnarvon correspondent yesterday inter- viewed a porter at the railway station, who had received a letter from Private John Roberts, 29, Mountain-street (also a porter at the railway station), and wTto went over to Boulogne with the Expeditionary Foroeg under General French. Roberta was engaged in tho fight that took place on Sunday when t.be British casualties amountod to 2000. He writes to his friond:- "I have been in Belgium, and have been wounded in my legs. I am ooming on all right. I have been in a great 6grhA. We lost 2000, whereas the Germans lost 12,000 men. I hope to be in Carnarvon next week." Roberta' mother had also reoeived a letter from him, in which he said lie took part in the great fight. and thia.t another soldier was shot dead by his side. He does not, however, mention that he has been wounded, but indicates piat he is ill,

BISHOP MOSTYNS PASTORAL I LETTERj

BISHOP MOSTYN'S PASTORAL I LETTER. j A pastoral letter by the Bishoo of Men- evia (Dr. Francis Mostyn), having reference to the death of the Pope, was read on Sunday in all tho Roman Catholic ^Churches in North Wales, which constitute the dioceee of Menevia. The letter states:- ,It is our sad duty to an- nounce to you the sud den death of our Most Holy Father, Popo Pius the Tenth. After & very dhort illnes, aggravated no doubt by his terrible anxiety for his children in Europe who are engaged in deadly strife, he fell aøæerp in Christ early on Thursday morning last. We have no time on this occasion to remind you of the groat work he has done for the Church dur- ing his Pontificate, but we write now to-isk your most fervent prayers on his behalf. We exhort you to pray earnastly for our late Holy Father. Thus may the increased devotion to the Blessed Sacrament, which he has eo assiduously fiirthered in this world, be the moms of hastening his eternal reward.

THE SITUATION AT THE FRONT

THE SITUATION AT THE FRONT. FRENCH PRESS COMMUNIQUE. PARIS, Thursday. A communiquo to the Pretis issued at 11 pin. on Wednesday wt^xte«:— Generally our offensive progresses between Naiuy and the Vowgcs, but our lig-ht has been compelled slightly to retreat. Tho enemy appears.to have sustained considerable losece. Moro than fiftee,n hundred bodies were found in one limited area, and in one trench an entire section had been mowu down by our »holla. The dead were still in t.he position of aiming their rifles. For three days sanguinary engagements have continued in this region which seem as a whole to have resulted in our favour. The opposed forcctj appear to have retired after the fighting of the lawt few days In the north tho Franco-British lines huve been slightly drawn back; resitrt-ance con- tin.uca. To-morrow a decrco will be published in the official journal appointing General Gallieni commandant of the Anny of Paris and Mili- tary Governor. General Michel has asked for a command under the ordcra of General Gal- lieni:

RUSSIAN GENERALS PROPHECY

RUSSIAN GENERAL'S PROPHECY ROMF,. Thursday. The Messagero publishes a letter written in St. Petersburg, by a Russian General, whose name is suppressed. The General stated that Russia had mobilised eight million men. form- ing four armies of two millions each. The letter oontinued: "Be sure that when we shall have passed the frontier we shall be before Berlin in three weeks at the most."

THE ZEPPELIN BOMBS AT ANTWERP

THE ZEPPELIN BOMBS AT ANTWERP. AMERICAN INDIGNATION. NEW YORK, Thursday. The cabled accounts published here of the killing of harmless civilians at Antwerp by boml» dropped from airships have caused universal disgust, horror and indignation throughout tho United States, and, following upon tho formal protests lodged yesterday at Washington by the Belgian Minister, aro cer- tain to have a profound effect upon American public feeling. A prominent financier, in a letter to the new.spaperw, caustically voices the general view as follows: "It only remains for the Kaiser to telegraph to sjme one 'with God'.s g"i aeiou.s aseiista.noa our Zeppelins have suc- ceeded in a glorious achievement; you will join with me in thanking the Almighty. I have bestowed upon the Count Zeppelin the iron c-roori of the firat 3.,nd second cla.Sri.'

AUSTRIAN NAVAL MOVEMENTS

AUSTRIAN NAVAL MOVEMENTS. I ATTEMPTED BOMBARDMENT OF I BUDUA. ROME. Thursday. A despatch from Cetinje states that four Austrian cruisers and eight torpedo boats are i, the Gulf of Ca.tta,ro. Yesterday two Austrian torpedo boats eta.rted to bombard Budua, which is occupied by the Montenegrins, but fled on the approach of the allied lfeets. Officers of the Austrian cruitscr Zell,ta acknowledge that during the naval fight a torpedo boat wai sunk ill addition bo the Zeuta.

I JAPANESE BLOCKADE OF KIAO CHAO

I JAPANESE BLOCKADE OF KIAO CHAO. PARIS, Wednesday Night. A telegram reoeived here from To;o states that tho blockade of Kiao Chao by the Japanese commenced to-day.

IBRITISH VISITORS RETURNINGI FROM SWITZERLAND

I BRITISH VISITORS RETURNING FROM SWITZERLAND. LUCERNE1, Wednesday. Four hundred British visitora to Lucerne, tho Engadino and Zurich have left by the second Government .special train for Paris and London, whoro they will probably arrive on Friday. One hundred Americana have left by their special train.

ICANADIAN GENEROSITYI

I CANADIAN GENEROSITY, I OTTAWA, Wednesday Night. Prince Edward Island has promised to sup- ply one hundred thousand bushels of oats to tho Mother Country. Messrs Hiram Walker and Sons, Limited, of Walkergive, will give fifty thousand dollars towards the general military and naval expenditure.

I GERMAN ROUT IN EAST PRUSSIA

I GERMAN ROUT IN EAST PRUSSIA I RUSSIANS TAKE THOUSANDS OF PRISONERS. ROME, Wednesday. T'ho Tribuna publishes a despatch from St. Petersburg stating tha.t sanguinary engage- me-nta continue in Eaat Prwsia. Pursued by numerous divisions of Cossacks the Germans Are in flight, everywhere, abandoning the lake fartificatkaif, and leaving th-eir convoys, ammunition and artillery. 'ihe rout is com- plete. The Russians have taken thousands of prisoners.

RUSSIANS IN WESTERN PRUSSIA

RUSSIANS IN WESTERN PRUSSIA. I PANIC IN BERLIN. Another despatch from St. Petersburg to the Tribuna atatea that with tho exception 

THE JAPANESE AMBASSADOR

THE JAPANESE AMBASSADOR. I ARRIVAL FROM BERLIN AT THE HAGUE. A telegram from Amst-erdafm dated August 35th, but delayed in transmission, states that the Japanese Ambassador has arrived from Berlin at The Hague with the members of the Japanese Legation staff. He expresses ILJS satiisfaction with the way in which tho German Government arranged for his jour- ney to Holland. A special train was put at h's dnspoeaj. Twanty persons accompanied him, including four ladies and Mr Okuda, the Japanese Consul-general at Hamburg.

IANGLORUSSIAN TRADE ROUTES

I ANGLO-RUSSIAN TRADE ROUTES. ST. PETERSBURG. Anglo -Russian trade routes during the war form one of the more important questions and are secondary only to that of military success. The entire Germaai trade with Russia is now offered to England, British warships guarantee tho safety of the Archangel route. Tons of Siberian butter and millions of Rus- sian eggs have boon sold to England and also stocks of timber. The removal of the prohibition ajgainsfc ex- porting foodstuffs is desired with tie proviso that these are aemt to friendly countries, and tha Anglo-Russian Chamber of Commerce has al-pointf,d a special committee to deal with the matter.

IGEHMAN ATROCITIESI

I GEHMAN ATROCITIES. I I TERRORISING THE COUNTRY- I SIDE. I BELGIAN OFFICIAL INQUIRY. I The following statement was issued by the Preæ Bureau on Tuesday afternoon The Belgian Minister haa made the follow- ing statement: "In spite of solemn assuranoes of goodwill and long-standing treaty obligatic Q Ger- many has mado a .sudden savage and utterly ut warranted attack on Belgium. "However sorely pressed she may be, Bel- gtiUlU will never tight unfairly and never stoop to infringe tho laws and customs of legitimate warfare. Sho is putting up a brave fight against overwhelming odds, ehe may be beaten, she may bo crushed, but, to quote our noble King's words, 'she will never bo enslaved.' "Woon German troops invaded our country the Belgian Government issued public state- ments, which were placarded in every towu. village, a.nd hamlet, waruin.g all civilians to abstain scrupulously from hostile acts against tho enemy's troops. The Belgian Press daily published similar notices through the land. Neverthelceti, the German authorities have issued lately statements c-on,tainin.g grave im- putations against the attitude of the Belgian civilian population, threawnin,g u.3 the same time with dire reprisals. These impu- tations are contrary to the real facts of the case, and, as to threat6 of further vengeance, no menace of odious reprisals on the part of the German troops will deter the Belgian Government from protesting before the civil- ised world against the fearful and atrocious crimes committed wilfully and deliberately by the invading hosts against helpless non- oombatants, old men, women, and children. Long is the list of outrages committed by the German troops, and appalling the details of atrocities, as vouched for by the Commit.too of Inquiry. recently formed by the Belgian Minister of Justice and presided over by him. This Committee comprises tho highest judi- cial and University authorities of Belgium, such as Chief Justice Van Iseghem, Judge Nys, Professors Cottier, Wed on, etc." I SOME INSTANCES. "The following instances and particulars have been established by careful investiga- tions based in each ease on the evidence of reliable eye-witnesses: "German cavalry occupying the village of Linsmeau were attacked by some Belgiaai in- fantry and two gendarmes. A German officer was killed. by cur troops during the fight, and subsequently buried at the request of the Belgian oiffcer in oommand. No one of th,o-civilia,n population took part in the fight- ing at Linsmeau. Nevertheless, the village was invaded at dusk on August 10th by a strong force of German cavalry, artillery, and machine guns. In spite of the formal assurances given by the Burgomaster of Lins- meau that none of tho peasants had taken part in the previous fight two farms and six outlying houses were destroyed by gun-fire and burnt. All the male inhabitants were then compelled to come forward and hand over whatever arms they possessed. No re- cently discharged fire-arms were found. Never- theless the invaders divided these peasants into three groups, those in one group were bcund, and eleven of them placed in a ditch, whero they were afterwards found dead, their skulls fractured by the butts of German rifles. During the night of August 10th German cavalry entered Velm in great numbers The inhabitants were asleep. The Germans, with- out provocation, fired on M. bouse, broke into it, destroyed furniture, looted money, burnt barns, hay and corn stacks, farm implements, six oxen, a.nd the contents of the farmyard. They carried off Mrs Deglimme-Gevers half naked to a place two miles away. She was then let go, and was fired upon as she fled, without being hit. Her husband was carried a.way in another direction and fired upon. He is dying. The same troops sacked and burned tho house of I a raIlway watchman. I MUTILATIONS, Farmer Jef Dierick, of Neerhespen, bea.r8 witness to the following acts of cruelty com- mitted by German cavalry at Ormsael and Neerhespen on August 10th, 11th, and 12th: "An old man of the latter village had his arm slicod in threo longitudinal cuts; he was then hanged head downwards and burned alive. Young girls have been raped and little children outraged at Orsmael, where several inhabitants suffered mutilations too horrible to describe. A Belgian soldier belonging to a battalion of cyclist carabiniers, who had been wounded and made prisoner, was hanged, whilst another, who was tending his com- rade, was bound to a telegraph pate on the St. Trond road and shot. "On Wednesday, August 12th. after an en- gagement at ilaelen, Commandant Van Damme, so severely wounded that he was ly- ing prone on his back, was finally murdered by German infantrymen firing their revolvers into his mouth. "On Monday, August 10th, at Orsmael, the Germans picked up Commandant Knapen, very seriously wounded, propped him up against a tree, and shot him. Finally they hacked his corpse with swords. "In different places, notably at Hollogue- sur-Geer, Barchon, Pontisee, Haclen, and Zelck, German troops have fired on doctors, ambulanoe bearers, ambulances, and aimbul- ance waggons carrying the Red Cross. "At Bon eel lee a body of German troops marched into battle carrying a Belgian flag. On Thursday, August 6th, before a fort at Liege, German soldiers oontinued to fire on a party of Belgian soldiers (who were un- armed) and had been surrounded while digging a trench) after these had hoisted the vhitc flag. "On the Barno day, at Votteei, near the fort of Loncin, a group of German infantry hoisted the white flag. When Belgian soldiers approached to take them prisoners th." Germans suddenly opened fire on them at close ran.ge." I SAVAGERY AT AERSCHOT. I "Harrowing reports of German savagery at Aeischot have reached the Belgian Govern- ment at Antwerp from official local sources. Thus on Tuesday, August 18th, the Belgian troops occupying a position in front of Aeischot received orders to retire without en- gaging the enemy. A small force was left behind to cover the retreat. This foroo re- sisted valiantly against overwhelming Ger- man farces, and inflicted serious losses on them. Meanwhile, practically the whole civilian population of Aerachot, terrorised by tho atrocities oommitted by the Germans in the neighbouring villages, had fled from the town. Next day, Wednesday, August 19th, German troops entered Aerschot without a shot having been fired from the town, and without any resistance whatever having been made. The few inhabitants that remained had closed their doors and windows in com- pliance with the general orders issued by the Belgian Government. Nevertheless, the Ger- mans broke into the houses and told the in- habitants to quit. "In one single street the first six male in- habitants who crossed their thresholds were seized and shot at once, under the very eyes of their wives and children. "The German troops then retired for the day, only to return in greater numbers on th next day, Thursday, August 20th. "They then compelled the inhabitants to leave their houses, and marched them to a place 200 yards from the town. There, with- out more ado, they shot M. Thielemann, the Burgomaster, his fifteen-year-old son, the clerk of the local judicial board, and ten pro- minent citizens. They then set firo to the tewn and destroyed it.'

SERVIAN GOVERNMENT PROTEST

SERVIAN GOVERNMENT PROTEST. PARIS, Monday Night. The Servian Crovernment itifcxrmed the French Government of the terms of a protest which has been formulated concerning the actions of the Austro-Hungarian troops. The protest includes the following atate- went-, The Austro-nun?ar?H superior of&c?ra f given the troops instructions which &njott? them to burn the h?rvcsta amd a?t fire to yiHages, to kill and hang ?a<'?atMe ntb??? tants. During their retreat to the Drina the Austro-hitn-ariaa troops committed tinpicOO* dented cruelties. Our troops encountered 00 their march a great number of murdered v»c tinu of these atrocities; and all old women and children who had been mutilated; Theso horrible cruelties havo horrified oXi* soldiers to such an extent that it will be vefj. difficult to restrain the outbreak far the t siro of vengeance and for reprisal. Theae facte constitute a flagrant viotiLtiOO of tho laws of war, and in conscqueuoe W.w Servian Government will be compelled to tat., all moasures of reprisal compatible with tfaf ,• law of nations. t.'

TERRIBLE REPORTS FROM j LIEGE

TERRIBLE REPORTS FROM j LIEGE. ) ■ :X Count and Countess do Iii Roche, with then children and servants, including an EngU8'1 ■■ governess, arrived at Torquay* on Tuesday j (says the Central News) after having a.baa- 1 doned their chateau outside Mouij lost Thurø- day morning on receipt of the news of th* German approach. The Count had had hilt chateau fitted up as a hospital, and his motor cars had been out daily bringing in Belgian wounded for treatment by the lied Croats staff- On Thursday morning, when everything W20 abandoned, a motor da&h was made fOr Oatend through roads choked with troops and refugees. All along the route fleeing p"- sants told fearful stories of German atroci- ties. Three women from Liege who had loflt their all related specific acts of atrocity com- mitted in Liege itself. Houses were fired, children's feet were held in the flajnes, and women wore dragged out and shockingly trea-tcd before being tau.gc..d.

10000 AUSTRIAN PRISONERS I

10,000 AUSTRIAN PRISONERS. I  ARMY LO:IT  IUIIR.O OF TIlE SOU'l'IfEItl\'A.ItMY LO?T ] no ME) W oonoOOday. A felogrmni from the Servian headquarter* 1 at Nish to the Meesagerto states that th. Austrian prisoners in Servia number tea thousand, and that the Austrian losses since the commencement of the war, including dead and wounded, amount to a third of the ori- ginal strength of the Southern Army. According to statements made by prisoners of war there had been numerous desertion* > from the Austrian army.

I BIG TERRITORIAL CAMP1

I BIG TERRITORIAL CAMP .1 1 TRAINING ON THE MORFA. j I 1 MARCHING IN SHIRT SLEEVES. 1 Once ag?in the atmosphere of war has f

IWELSH CARNARVON RG ARTILLERY

I WELSH (CARNARVON) R.G. ARTILLERY. I LATEST PROMOTIONS. The following promotions are notified in con- nection with the Welsh (Carnarvonshire) Royal Garrison ArtilleryCorporal Owen (Carnarvon) to be sergeant; Bombardier R. B. Roberts (Ban- gor) to be oorporal; Acting Bombardier John Jones (Bangor), Gunners S. J. West (Carnar- von), Gwilym Owen (Bangor), Watts (Llandud- no), John Morri3 (Bangor), J. W. Jonea (Ban- gor), R. Thomas (Llandudno). Robert William* (Bangor), Ben. L. Williams (Bangor), sol Warrca (Carnarvon), all to be bombardiers.

I CASUALTY LISTS

I CASUALTY LISTS. I PRIME MINISTER'S REBUKE. In the House of Commons, on Wednesday, Mr Norton Griffiths (Wednesbury) asked Mr Tennant (Under-Secretary for War) what steps were being taken to relieve the suspense and anxiety of those who had relatives in the Expeditionary Foroe by publishing the list of oasualitiea? Mr Tennant: No list of oasuaJities has oome in yet. Mr R. Gwynne (Eastbourne): Will the right hon. gentleman say when he expecta it? Mr Asquith: I am sorry that question should be asked (cheers). Sir John Frenoh reports to us that owing to the extended front on whioh tho operations took plaoe it is difficult to oom- piLe a complete list, and it would be most cruel and inexpedient to issue an imperfect one (hear, hear).

I PRICE OF MEAT ADVANCED

I PRICE OF MEAT ADVANCED. The Board of Trade are informed by t,ho Advisory Committee of the National Federation of Meat Traders' Associations that the oontinued rise in wholesale prices of beet and mutton renders necessary the following ad- vances in retail prices:- For prime parts the advance, compared with a month ago need not exceed Id per lb. For the coarser parts the demand continues to be relatively greater than for prime joints, and the oommittoe consider that an advance, com- pared with a month ago, of ld to 2d per lb. on the average may reasonably be charged for these parte. The prios of pork and veal show no advance at present. In tho event of any important change in tha situation, a further announcement will bo made after conference between the Board of Trade and the National Federation

ISUSPENSION OF A PRIVATS BANK

I SUSPENSION OF A PRIVATS BANK. I ARRANGEMENT WITH LLOYDS. We are informed that Messrs Harris, Bultoot. and Co. (Naval Bank), of Plymouth and elso- where, have issued a circular announcing that they have been obliged to suspend payment, and have executed a deed of arrangement in favour of trustees. In order to meet the convenience of the cus- tomers of the firm, and to minimise the losa which will be occasioned by the suspension, fir- rangements have been made whereby Lloyds Bank, Limited, will be prepared to give all possible banking facilities to the customers, in- cluding immediate advanoes, without interest, to those having credit balances on current or deposit account. Representatives of Lbytis Bank will be in attendance on and from to-day at the offices of the Naval Bank in ,)rjr t,) carry out these arrangements. The firm of Messrs Harris, Bulteel and Co. was established in 1774. The fixed issue is 227,321. In addition to the head offioe. at Plymouth there are 14 branches and agencies, all in Devonshire.