Collection Title: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
13 articles on this page
BY THE WAY 1

BY THE WAY. '1 Pfofissional Invalids, I Of all the professions, learned and un- j learned, none possess for me less attraction j than- that of the invalid. I use the term "prefesslan H in this connection advisedly, for there are some people to whom q ill- health" is much less an accident than an art. Others of us are only invalids when we cannot help it. Some sudden slip on a banana skin lays us low, or the "flue" pros, trates us, and, as we lie on our couch, con- strained by the peremptory orders of the doctor or the not less solicitous pleadings of our wives to "keep quiet "—and, incident- ally, to give as little trouble as we can—how gladly would we renounce the prerogatives 01 the invalid and how readily exchange places with those who go about their business bale and hearty! A few of us, I truly believe, have such a horror of invalidism that, rather than succumb to its insidious grip, we would "carry on" at all eosts and whatever alti. tude to which our temperature may rise; and, if need be, drop on the road like the faithful dog who runs till he can run no more. But there are certain folks who delight in invalid ism for its own sake. Without being ill, they pose as delicate and fragile flowers of human- ity, and very often, in the end, actually per- suade themselves into an illness. These are the professional invalids, whose only cure is a dose of brutal frankness, though even that is seldom efficacious in the more stubborn cases. A less advanced species of the pro- fessional invalid is he or she—generally she- who, while being, perhaps, what we may call "under the weather," make themselves a great d-aal worse by always fancying them- selves more seriously ill and cosseting them- selves and looking for the sympathy and at- tention of those about them with an air of plaintive and querrulous irritability. To such as these I should recommend some really stiff: hard work and plenty of exercise; but you can never persuade them of this, and they usually go on flirting with ill-health until they, too, in time develop into full-fledged professionals. Perhaps they may he startled out of their Perhaps they may be startled out  the most robust i of us to the far-reaching scope of our now familiar friend Dora. "Somewhere in the Midland Counties" there is a farm labourer's wife who took her profession as an invalid so seriously that three years, ago, possibly even then a little wearied of tlae war, she took to her bed. And there, month after month, year after year, she has re- mained ever since, as one journal puts it, "with the blankets of a profound neutrality about her head., while the rest of the world has cultivated its more active form of in- sanity." But it would seem that, whatever oqg eauld do in one's own bed before the war, none daring to make us afraid, since Dora has had her say in the regulation of our habits there is a limit of inactivity and pas- sive dwelling between the sheets beyond which it is dangerous to attempt to proceed. For, under some msre or less obscure sub-fee^-on of Regulation some number or another, the Authority of the Law has invoked in the matter of that inert lady and efforts are being made, presumably in the national interest," to move her from between the blankets. At any rate, it is reported that a warrant of commitment" has been issued against her, and, though I do not quite know what that is, and stilllefli am I able to understand the particular nature of her offence, it is the sort of thing which has a disturbing import, and has its very drastic warning for our professional invalids, reminding them that the art is no longer to be practised with impunity, and that evidently lying in bed when everybody else is up and doing is only another of those domestic matters into which nowadays some Controller or another is apt to pry with hazardoub consequences. In, future, apparently, it may be necessary to ¡ have a permit to be a hypochondriac, and 1 s can only hope that officialism, true to its well known character, will make it as diffi- cnlt1 as possible to obtain it. Nevertheless the professional invalid is not altogether without his or her at any rate partial apologists. Charles Lamb, if not: exactly one of their number, has drawn such an attractive picture of the regal solitude of the sick-room" as to offer serioui tempt- i ation to us to envy the lot of him who can "draw daylight curtains about him and be- come insensible to all the operations of life, except the beatings of one feeble pulse." How the patient lords it, there; what caprices he acts without control • how king- ? Uk?e he swvs bis pillow—tumbling and tossing and shifting and lowering, and thumping and flatting and moulding it to the ever-varying requisitions of his throb- bing temples. He has put on his strong armour of sickness, he is wrapped in his callous hide of suffering, he keeps his sympathy, like some curious vintagle, under trusty look and key, for his own use only. But then, after all, he is ill and may conse- I quently ? given som? measure of excuse for ¡f his jMli-absorpttc?. He if, in sh? not & i professional, though even as to. professionals Mr. MoBel Tollemache has 'HBtured to asb: "Does a MM?K?e t?MC?TMH?e, purely and simple, exist," seeing that (as he ar g ues) uq one without ??ethmg wrong in his nervoMS syat?m would ?e hypochondri&cal. WeIL, I suppose some cause can be found for everv  effect, and it may be that even the profes- sional invalid has his excuses. Yet Mr. Tolle- mache himself, I see, is constrained to admit that it is far from pleasant to be brought to close quarters with them, especially at hotels and hydrepatliies--their principal resorts— ¡ and "a philosophical hater of boredom might think that between the cult of wealth and that of health, between vanitas vanitatum and sanitas sanitatum there is little to choose." Truly so, and that only brings us back to the point from which we started: that, of all I folks, may heaven specially deliver us from those who are so anxious about their health that they are not satisfied until they have made themselves ill, or at any rate, insisted on making us think they are. And, if heaven fails us, is it possible that Dora, whose j powers we certainly know to be almost un- 1 limited, can really help us in this respect, I as would seem to1 be the case? If so, let us not think tog hardly of her, after all. F A PHILOSOPHER ON THE PROWL. I

kWar Weapons Week i

k-, War Weapons Week. i OSWESTRY RAISES £ 55,487. As was stated at the prelimiaafy meeting in the Guildhall, Oswestry, to inaugurate the War Weapon Week Campaign at Oswestry, tht Central War Savings Committee had assessed the borough at £ 50,000, and it was decided to go one better than this, and to endeavour to raise £ 55,000 during the period allotted to the task. Mr. Pasquil and hi5 energetic hand of workers set to work .I.:urly II and "kept at it" late, leaving no possible j stone unturned to increase the uOlitl, which gradually grew, as the week progressed, until, on Saturday evening, tIif spectacular record at the Market Hall entrance in the Cross indicated that the £ 5."),f/0i; noi.cn had been passed., amid loud chc >,rs. ■, from the assembled crowd. The actual .anoint of the returns show the total, so far as f'n possibly be ascertained to date, to be 8s. (id. The Mayor (Councillor Barlow) was present to make the official announcement, and he was accompanied b Y Lieut.,Co lHud Sir Henry and Lady Webb, and a numb? of those who w^rkect assiduously in the good cause, includ- ing Councillor J. E. Thomas, Mr. J. If. Profit, Mr. E. H. Bradley,Mr. Harold Thomas, Mr. James (postmaster), and. the secretaries of several of the district War Savings Associa- tions, all of whom had thrown themselves heart and soul into the work. The occasion was one for felicitous speech-making; and l Sir Henry seized the opportunity to congra- tulate the people of the borough and the sur- rounding district upon what they had accom- plished.. During the week the bands of the Royal Inniskillings and the King's Liverpool performed an attractive programme of music on the Cross; their efforts being much appre. ciafced by the crowds who assembled to wit- ness the gradual upward tendency of the figures on the record near the Hut Bank. A feature of the week's collections is provid.ed by the excellent results achieved by the various War Savings Associations in town and district, and the fgures of some of these certainly deserve to be quoted. Whitiington raised £ 2,500} Llanyblodwel (over) £5,000; St. Martins, £ 1,600; West Felton, £ 58J; Ruyton-xi-Io^yns. £ 380; Knockin, 9-300; Kinl- 1 rerley, 38; Selattyn, £ 271; Parish Churcn War Savings Association,'< £ 641.; Boys' High School, £ 87 Liberal Club War Savings Asso- ciation, £ 708; Trinity Church, £ 70; Pruden- tial Assurance Company, 93,705. The winning numbers in Messrs. Bradley and Co.ii prize scheme in connection with the campaign are given in their advertise- Jnenton page 2 to-day,

IWales and TemperanceI

I Wales and Temperance; I l A NATIONAL POLICY. I I The third meeting of the Central Tomper- f ance Council for Wales was held at Shrews- bury, with Sir Herbert Roberts, M.P., in the chair. The Bishop of Llandaff, president of the South W aes Temperance Association, attended, and a i ng the questions discussed were the working of the Control Board's order in the Welsh area; the continuance after the war of the present restrictions; the I lextension of the Sunday closing to Monmouth- shire a, national referendum on war-time ?p?r.h i? i.tioil the position of the Welsh Local? Option Bill; the new Franchise Act the work  of WoeI\; and social cotruotioIl' Th3 l Council unanimously adopted resolutions I approving of a united temperance policy for Wales; the continuance After the war of the present restrictions of the drink traie the amendment of the Act to make the compensa- tion levy compulsory; and the right of the people fiy local option to control the licensing system. It was also a. g reed that provision should be made for securing Sunday closing for Mon- mouthshire, the abolition of grocers' licences, the proper control of drains, the closing of j public-hdusses and clubs on election day, t! j prevention of the removal of licences trom one district to another, and the prohibition :1 of the sale of drink to young people. Arrangements were made for an extensive I¡ campaign in support of this Welsh temperance policy.

Oswestry Flying OfficersI Exploit

[ Oswestry Flying Officer's I | '■ Exploit, Alderman C. E. Williams, Salop House, Oswestry, has received official news that his i younger son, Lieut. N. E. Williams, R.A.F., while returning from a long flight over enemy territory, had to land inpenmark and will probably be interned there under the rules governing the treatment of belligerents who land on neutral territory. Wa understand Lieut. Williams, in the ogm oe of bis ong flight, had made most successful attack oil his objective, and it was an unlucky accident to his machine which compelled him to core e down on Danish soil. The Admiral has ex- pressed his pleasure at Lieut. Williams's performance, and, this is shared -by all his brother officers. It will be a matter of satisfaction tq an Lieut. Williams's friends in Oswestry to knc. that, although probably interned, he is on neutral ground, where the welfare of the1 captive is carefuliv looked after.

THE CHURCHESj

THE CHURCHES. j A special form of prayer is being issued under the authority of the archbishops foi use at the special intercession services on August 4th, the fourth anniversary of the outbreak of war. The Rev. Philip Oliver Williams has received a unanimous call from the Presbyterian Church, Carionbury, London. and has resigned the pas- torate of Evert/on Brow Church. Liverpool. Mr. I Williams was at one time Presbyterian minister at Bowling Bank and Bangor Isycoed. The Rev. J. Morda Evans, pastor of the Eng- lish Congregational churches of Greenfield (Holywell), Mostyn and Ffynnongroew, has J accepted a call to the pastorate of the John Robinson Memorial Church. Gainaborouafr, Lincolnshire, and will take up his duties there in September. The Rev. W. Wileok. the new pastor of the Welshpool Primitive Methodist circuit, weA ap- pointed to Welshpool from Presteign, where his Place has been filled by the Rev. W. Brother- ton, late pastor at Welshpool. The new pastor is not entirely a stranger to the district, having travelled the Bishop's Castle circuit for five ve.ar5 and afterwards the Ellesnnere cir- cuit for seven years. The Rev. W. S. Rowlett, formerly pastor of the Welshpool Primitive Methodist circuit, has been superannuated after 52 years' service, and h&s taken up his residence in the Wrockwardine Wood circuit, which he had "travelled" twice as minister. He has the, distinction of being the only minister who "travelled" the Welshpool circuit three times. The Rev. Samuel Chadwick, of Cliff College, Sheffield, was inducted as new president at Friday's annual conference of the Wesleyan Methodist denomination, held in Manchester. Mr. Chadwick- was born in 1860, in the Lan- cashire cotton town of Burnley, where he began life., as a half-timer at the early a of eiglht years. Joining the Wesleyan body in his teens, he became a prominent member in his district, art,d commenced to preach as a hired local preacher in the Bacup area, on the recommenda- tion of the Rev. Josiah Mee. In 1883 he be- came a candidate for the Wesleyan Methodist ministry, and being accepted by the conference was sent to Didsbury College for training. After veare of successful work in Edinburgh, Glasgow, London and Leeds. Mr. Chadwick in 1907 went to Cliff College as tutor in Biblical knowledge, and on the death of the Rev. Thomas Cook he was appointed principal. I ———

AntiMilitarism I

Anti-Militarism. I MAYOR INTERVENES AT WREXHAM MEETING. I A conference of the National Council for Civil Liberties, which took place at Wrexham, oa Saturday, met with opposition at the hands of the Mayor (Mr. L. B. Rowland) in refer- ence to one of its resolutions. Mr. E. T. John, M.P., presided, and the resolution in question, which had been moved by the Rev. Cernyw Williams, of Corwen, expressed hostility to the military training of children, the introduction into schools of special lessons on the authorative view of patriotism and other political matters, and the application of any political or religious test whatsoever for teae ers. "All such devices for the militarisation of the rising gener- ation," the resolution concluded, "are a menace to the industrial freedom, the safety of theçlemooracyl and the future good rela. tions of the peoples of the world." After Mr. J. D. Williams, organising secre- tary of the Surfacemen'^ Union, had seconded and other delegates supported ths resolution, the Mayor, amid demonstrations of annoyance on the part of the delegates, expressed his disapproval of part of the resolution, and de- clared that a more representative gathering should have been called for a conference of this nature, instead of limiting it to people who were all of one kidney." This led to a lively interchange of compli- ments. One delegate accused the Mayor of changing his views at different meetings. The Mayor retorted with vigorous emphasis that this was not true, and added, In plain English, the man, is a liar!" The gentleman alluded to proceeded to argns the question, and another delegate interrupted with the suggestion that the spirit of the conference was being broken by his action. The resolution was carried with two dis- sentients. j ———.—— -—————

BRYMBO

BRYMBO. THE STEEL WORKS BAND.This band, tvder the conductorahip of Mr. J. C. Taylor, gave a very eu joy able promenade concert at Chester, on Saturday. The programme was:— March. "President" (Hume); overture, "Martha" (Flotow); cornet polo, "Perfection" (Whpte); selection. "MercadanteV (Round); de- scriptive selection; intermezzo, "Cavalliera Rus- tieano" (Masscagni): selection, "Barber of Seville" (Rosinni); euphonium solo, liB, Som- a.mbula (Bellini); Harrv Lauder's songs. FREE CIIURCH COUNCIL —On Monday, the oommittee met at Bethel Schoolroom. Ar- rangementts were made for holding a, united singing festival on the third Monday in Novem- ber. The programme will he that of the Neath National Eisteddfod. The final selection of a conductor will be made at the next meeting. Rehearsals will be held at each of the Wekh Nonconformist chapels of the parish, and the festival will take place at Engedi, Mr. D. E. Rees presiding in the afternoon and the Rev. R Hughes in the evening. Collections will be made to defray expenses an d any surplus hande-d over to the Red Cross Fund

No title

The Liverpool and District Railwaymen's Vigilance Committee have resolved t,orequest the Executive Committee of the once to open up negotiations with the Railway Executive for a further advance of 10s. per week. The reasons advanced are that the enormous increase in all household utensils, boots and clothing, "as well as presistent and caljous profiteering in all articles of un- rationed food," make the present war wage totally inadequate to maintain a reasonable standard of living and eaa?l? ? railway workers to discharge satisfactorily their in- creasingly onerous duties. At a meeting of the Soqth Wales Miners' Federatjon Council on Monday, it was announced that the selection of miners' can- didates for the Parliamentary divisions of the coalfield was completed, except the Aberavon division, where a dispute delayed the conclu- sion of the ballot. The candidates ajre: — Major Watts Morgan, Rhondda East; Mr. William Abraham, M.P., Rhoudda West; Mr. William Br^cf, M.P., Abertillery; Mr, T. Richards, M.P., Ebbw Vale; Mr. John Willianis, M.P., Gower; Mr. Vernon Harts- horn, Ogmore; Mr. Charles Edwards, Bed- welty; Mr. James Winstone, Merthyr; Mr. Alfred Onion. Caerphilly.

I CORRESPONDENCE

I CORRESPONDENCE. Ifirt BO HOT TlSCESSABltS 

t LATEST WAR NEWS

t LATEST WAR NEWS. The British have now joined with the N French and Americans in the successful counter-stroke aimed at the Germans in France. Sinice General Voch began his counter-offensive the enemy has been obliged to retreat beyond the Marne and a large number of prisoners and material have fallea into the hands of the Allies. On Tuesday it was reported that the French and American troops had made still further advance and over 21,000 prisoners have now been captured on the Marne. The British have also made progress near Rheims aftqr very obstinate fighting. » The Amsterdam "Telegrflraf" re ports that all German repairs at Zeebrugge Harbour, Mole, and Locks have again been destroyed by Allied airmen. Two torpedo boats were sunk by bombs, and the canal remains closed. There is an unconfirmed report of a rising in Rumania against the enemy, who is said to have been forced to despatch large numbers of troops. -'—<— ——-

I rhosllanerchruqog

I rhosllanerchruqog. AEWS OF SOLDlteiftS.; L?an eerO orporal Jonathan Pxiillipfc and Pte. Rober Owen. who ihave spent tscwiie ye.i^ in America joined the Cana-dian foroets, have been at homo together. Pte. J. Criffithg (4th R.W.F.) has also been at hom^. He. camp, from the hospital at Heaton Park, Manchester Griffiths was injured in try- ing to plaice a wounded officer in safety. O triors who he been at horrid on leave are Ptes. Danial N. Jonea, Thos. Jones, David Hughes and Thos. Griffiths, Cadets Brinley efdwards and John Jones, Warrant Officer John Davies, and Corpl. Robert E. Thomas.

No title

I It is now officially confirmed that the ex- Czar has been assassinated by the Bolsheviks. I The Czarina and her son have been removed I to a place of security.

Advertising

Kidney Complications, Rheumatism and Dropsy. Ten Years Cur^d." Mr, Robert Jones lives at 102, Newtown, Askford, Kent, and is a well-known railwav ( employee. On October 18th, 1910, ha aa.id :-r" No one seeing me now would imagine that two y,r5 ago I was an apparently hOpeless invalid, with advanced Jcidnøydi$, afc*umatM», an? -drtoy diseaa*?, Yet it it only through Doans Backaehe Kidney i PUls that I am, alive to-day. I had gone from had to worse, till at, tatSt I was txt heiples| rcippla. "MOISt of the ticne T Uv i" bed propped up with pillows, often in such agonv that morphia was injeo'ed lc) deaden the pain. 1. made no progress, and ax, last lost hope. Then, however. I decided to try Doaji's Backache Kidney, Pills, and I rallied a* soon as I began this treat-merit "The dropsy gra.duatlly subsided; I regained bladder activity, the rheumatism leift me. and alter the 6M, box of thesa I w40 froe, from all kidney weakness. Shortly afterwards. I underwent. medical examination for my: pregsnt pset, aad was ltmdid!y¡¡¡uocø!o(}nd pfroof of salute oureby Pills, (Sistned) Robert Jones." Passed for Service Aboard. On January 3rd. 1918, Mr. Jonfo said: Ton yars of excellent, health is, prool that Boan's Pills acted thoroughly. And thftn thesra is the add^ fajot that I am Medically Fit for Foreign Service. To ensure th& same results as Mr. I, insist upon the saw- e, Kidney Medicine— DOAN'S BACKACHE KIDNEY PILLS. Sold by all Dwterst, or s. 9dt. a bottle, from. Fostm- McCUllan Co., 8 W4118 St., Oxford, i>Lt itondon^ TVtnl*