Collection Title: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
8 articles on this page
BORDER MILITARY HONOURS I

BORDER MILITARY HONOURS. I D.S.O. Capt. W. Poster Greenwood, M.C.. York- I le-tiim.- Regt., son of Mr. W. E. Greenwood, The &U»k, lleptonstall, and grandson of Mr. W. -.ii. Larder, Tibberton (with whom he resided t'cr seme time), has just been awarded the t).S 0, for an exceptional piece of gallantry. JVhilsi in charge of a raiding party he dis- played very high powers of leadership and the most conspicuous personal gallantry. When ? part of the raiding party had lost direction tend others were held up by enemy fire, he penetrated the enemy's main position with only two men. He attacked a large party of the enemy who were firing from the top of the ) Railway cutting and inflicted heavy casualties pn theii., firing 36 rounds from his revolver at point-blank range. He subsequently cleared ou. 10 large enemy dugouts and shelters, kill- ing all who resisted, during which time his jparty was reduced to two, one of his com- panions being shot dead. He eventually re'l turned with 12 prisoners, having with the )Md of one man killed about 30 of the enemy. ?n face of great difficulties, Capt. Greenwood by his personal initiative and total disregard lef danger, prevented the raid from becoming ft failure, and achieved a partial success." 1rhe order was presented to the gallant officer en the battlefield by Maj-Gen. Babbington. (Although but 23 -7e?rs of? age, Capt. m-een- ?-ood has been in the armv nearly four years, *nd in April last was awarded the Military Cross. Capt. (Act. Lt.-CoL) M. M. Morgan-Owen, Hisses Regiment, son of Mr. Morgan-Owen, Llandinam, was awarded the D.S.O. in Jan- nary last. The official account of the deed Ii for which the award is granted is now pub- lished as follows:—"On the occasion of the enemy attack, when his battalion was in re- jserve, he moved it up to resist the attack, and ifreld on to the position for two day, though I i the troops on his flank were pressed back. His stedfast determination to hold his ground against repeated attacks and under heavy fire I largely contributed to restoring and keeping in hand the critical situation which had "Mn _W-' MILITARY CROSS. I Co.-Sergt.-Major Albert Bonser, 1.C., Shrops. L.I., son of Mrs. Bonser, Copthorne, Shrewsbury, attended a recent Investiture at Buckingham Palace, when the King conferred upon him the Military Cross for gallantry in the field. MILITARY MEDAL. I Pte. Frank Potts, K.S.L.I. (son of Mr. and Mrs. Potts, St. John's Road, Ludlow), has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field. He was formerly employed at Messrs. Marston Bros., as a motor driver. Pte. W. V. Birchall, K.S.L.I., only son of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Birchall, Richmond Ter- race, Whitchurch. He was wounded two ■ months ago and is in hospital at Ipswich. CROIX DE GUERRE. f Lt. J. E. Kyriaston. Yeo., att. K.S.L.I. 28866 Sergt. W. vvallis, R.F.A., Market Drayton. I MEDAILLE MILITAIRE. I 50398 Pte. met. L. Lorpl,) A. ?. juu?. I M.U.C., Aberdovey. 42994 Gnr. (act. L.-Bombr.) G. E. Ruberts,I R.F.A., Doigelley. HONOURS FOR HOSPITAL HELPERS. The names of the following have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War for valuable services rendered in con- nection with the war Capt. S. H. Hill. Wood, M.P., Cheshire Regiment, who was for some time second in command of the Cheshires when they were stationed at Drenewjdd Camp, Oswestry. Among the names of people brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War, by the Chairman of the Joint War Committee of the British Red Cross Society and Order of St. John of Jerusalem in England, for valu- able services rendered in connection with the establishment, organisation, and maintenance of hospitals are Adney, Miss E. J., Aux. Mil. Mosp,, uver- mead, Ludlow. Bonsall, Mrs. G. E., Montgoinerysnire. Dunsmor^ -Mrs. B., Merionethshire. Evton, Mrs. F., Ruthin. Harrison, Miss H., Montgoweryshire. James} Miss A. J., Red Cross Hosp., N:achyn. lleth. Lewis, Mrs. E. E., Montgomeryshire. Lloyd-Price, Mrs. E., Merionethshire. Mackenzie, Miss E. M., St. John's Hosp., Shrewsbury. More, Mrs. A., Merionethshire. Rowan-Robinson, Mrs. A.. Shropshire. Shore, Miss 0., Aux. Mil. Hosp., Quarry Place, Shrewsbury. Thomas, Miss C., Croesnewydd Aux. Mil. Hosp., Wrexham. Tan Bergen, Mrs. E., Attingham Park Aux. Mil. Hosp., Shrewsbury. Webley-Parry-Pryse, Lady (Nina), Aberyst- wyth. Wynn, The Hon. Mrs. C. H., Merionethshire.

No title

On Tuesday morning, at ten minutes past seven, the French offensive was renewed all along the ten-mile front between the Aisne and the Oise. The latest news is that up to nine o'clock there were 500 prisoners taken, with an advance all along the line. Following the successful British attack on Sunday on the north-west corner of the Lys plain salient, Sir Douglas Haig on Monday night reported a German drawing back of the head of the salient on both sides of the Lys and a British advance of over a mile on a front of over five miles. Merville has been occupied by our troops. A German with- drawal on about the san-ie front, also amount- ing to over a mile, took place in the week before last. Between the Oise and the Aisne the French have developed the operation be- gun on Saturday morning into an important gain.. Attacking again on Sunday evening they advanced from one to two miles on a front of ten miles, and secured the v. hole of a high plateau overlooking the German posi- tions north to the Oise, at the same time add- ing 1,700 prisoners to the 240 taken on Satur- day. The French have thus established on the ea?t side of the OiM, south of Novon, & position similar to that gained on the tcther side of the river, west of Noyon, by th cap- ture of the LMsigny ma?if. 'They have also secured a ttaft?g.point for a possible advance <&atwtrd nvcr th& p1ntpn nnrth of the A;sne.

I Military Appointments I

I Military Appointments. I Col. R. J. Bridgfo-rd, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., formerly of the K.S.L.I., has been re-appoint- ed Brig.-General in command of a brigade and attached to the Headquarters Units. Major C. F. Bj Winterscale, D.S.O., re- linquishes the acting rank of Lieut.-Colonel on ceasing to command a battalion (Feb. 19). &Major Winterscale, who was born in 1878, was gazetted in 1902, became Lieutenant in 1906, and was promoted acting Lieut.-Col. in January of last Besides the D.S O. he holds the South African Queen's medal and the Military Medal. Major D. H. Leslie, Bryntanat, Llansant- ffraid, Special iteserve, is gazetted acting Lt.- Col. while commanding a battalion (June 10). Temp. Capt. A. H. Bardswell, Oswestry, K.S.L.I. Volunteer Force, and Temp. Qr. Mr. and Hon. Lt. C. E. Penn, Shrewsbury, Shrop- shire R.A.M.C., relinquish their commissions. Lieut. G. L. Bennett Evans, of Llangurig, has been promoted Captain while in command of a company of the South Staffordshire Regt. in France. He was educated at Oswestry Grammar School and later at Downing Col- lege, Cambridge. He served in the South Staffs. Regiment in the Dardanelles, Egypt and France, where, he was wounded in 1916. His many friends will be pleased to hear of his so rapid promotion in the new battalion which he joined about six weeks ago in France, Lt. Harold Anthony Kenvon, M.C., Royal Engineers, a nephew of (Mr. R. Lloyd Kenyon, Pradoe, Shropshire, is gazetted a staff lieuten- ant. L t, G. Wroclhou-9e, Reserve Regiment S?c.-Lt. G. Wcodhouse, Reserve Regiment of Cavalry, son of Mr. J. Woodhouse, Elles- mere Road, Shrewsbury, is promoted full lieutenant as from July 1? 1917. Sec.-Lt. D. W. Oliver, R. W.F., of New- town, who was bandmaster to the battalion band when war broke out, is gazetted Lieut. (July 30), Temp. Sec..Lieut. (acting Capt. and- Adjt.), W. R. Weston, M.C., it.S.L.L, second son of Air, W. Weston, Tilley. Wem, is gazetted temp. Captain (March 29). He joined the Shrewsbury Pals in Sept. 1914, and after 20 months active service was given a commission. He was promoted Acting Capt. Adjt. in April this year. Mr. F. Walker, of Nantwich and Whit- church, has received a commission as a dental surgeon in the Army. From Whitchurch he has for some considerable time past acted in a private capacity as one of the staff of dental surgeons to the military at the Prees Heath and Bettisneld Camps. The following temporary chaplains to the Forces, 4th Class, to be temp. Chaplains to the Forces, 3rd Ulass (without increase of pav or allowances) while acting as senior chap- lains with the Forces, DeputyChaplain-Gen- eral's Department of a Divis'ion.The Rev. J. S. D. Rider (June 15) and D. B. Kittermaster (June 24).

f Self Government for Wales I

f Self Government for Wales. I COL. SIR E. PRYCE JONES'S VIEWS I Writing; to Mr. Edmund Gillart, clerk to Machynl^th Urban District, Council, Colonel bir Edward Pryce-Jones, M. P.says: You wrote me on the 9th inst. on behalf of your Urban District Council for my views on this question, and I apologise for not an- swering sooner. The fact is, I am pulling up arrears and I have felt also a difficulty in giving an answer that would he of much use to vour Council. I think the members show more wisdom than some of us who, for a variety of different reasons, go further, per- haps, than prudence would sanction. This matter came before the Welsh M.P.'s a few weeks ago, of all Parties, and I eventually voted with them expressing the desire for a greater degree of extension of self-government for Wales.' > "I voted, and others with me of opposite political views (as labelled, up to now) in order to help the Government to bring in a measure to meet the ideas of our fellow citi- zens across the Irish Channel. I pointed out then that this would probably not give Ireland quite what she wanted and perhaps Wales more than she expected or required. I felt Wales might make sacrifices if Ireland. could be induced to go hand in hand with the rest of the United Kingdom, with, say, some addi- tional powers similar to those enjoyed by the different States or Provinces of Canada and America. N As regards Wales, I cannot see at present that we/are ripe for a separate Parliament. I like the idea and the sentiment, but I can- not see how it is to be established just yet awhile and how it could work. Taking just one item-the conflicting interests of North and South Wales—different interests in the main and population disproportionate. The latter creates a difficulty of representation. There are many other aspects that must be faced before we go too far in our desire to reach the ideal. My own view is that we should approach our Parliamentary goal through our Countv Councils in the first in- stance, electing from those bodies some of their best men and forming a National Coun- cil. That would be the first stage or step on the road to a Welsh Parliament, and we already possess this power or united or joint action under the County Councils Act, 1888. We have not availed ourselves of these powers, arid I certainly think we might well do so, and this would mean 'extension of self- government for \Wales.' I think, perhaps, I have been long enough so I will stop. Please excuse me for not writ,h ing a better letter, but I have written it straight off and said just what I think. P.S.—I might mention that the proposal to appoint a Parliamentary Secretary for Wales, like Scotland, is ripe-for legislation, as everybody seems now to agree to this. He would represent Wales in the House of Com- mons and answer all questions affecting Wales. If the Welsh Members of Parliament were to make this request the Government (at their convenience) would almost to a certainty grant the appeal, and probably one of the Welsh M.P.'s would be appointed the Minister." •jflarrr-'

No title

——————* •"•Kit A strike of tramway and omnibus workers in London is causing great inconvenience to I the public. The cause of the strike is to en- force the women's demand for a war bonus J equal to that given to the men. Stoppages have also occurred in come provincial towns.

WELSH FARMRSIOIlj

WELSH FARMËRS:ÑIOIl.j I THE PRICE OF WOOL. I A special aieeting of the Central Council of the Welsh National Farmers' Union was held at Conway, Mr. J. N. Thomas, Holyhead, pre- siding over a large gathering representing fannoul association* in yarious parts of Wales. Mr. A. W. Barratt, of N- tihe district executive officer for Wales of the, Wool Depart- ment of the War Office, addressed the council in reference to the claims made by the union. As to the first claim, that the price paidfor wool clips to the Welsh farmers should be increased to 100 per cent, over the prices paid in 1S14, he said that the prices were fixed by the Treasury and not by his department. As to the claim that all wad should be weighed and priced locally, in 'bhe six counties of North WaJes about 100,000 clips of wool had to be taken up, and as there were not sufficient wool merchants with expert knowledge of wool to take up the whoie of theae dips, it was necessary to send them to the ceritre for pricing and grading. Newtown, the Bradford of Wales, had been a great wool centre for generations, and at New- town there were five expert wool merchants. In North Wtfle's there were nine merchants, all K-ood Wekhmen, ta-kinig up wool, two of the firms were at Cariiarvon and Bangor. His in- struction to them was that every farmer was to gerfc all that his wool was worth according to the authorised price list. What waa wanted was that the farmers should have more confidence in the officers engaged on the work. There was no farmer in Wales who could grecle wool, un- less he had been brougto up to tfee trade. The farmer knew less about wool than anything else he grew on the farm. A large proportion of the season's clip had already been delivered, but gh-e whole could ndt be accepted until the end of the year. A number of questions were put- to Mr. Bar- rett, 14) was pointed out by more than one speaker that there was no wish to harass the Government, and that all the farmers desired was to have a. proper understanding and fair treatment.—Mr. J. Phillips of LJandrillo said that Welsh wethera were sent into Shropshire and clipped there, and the clips fetehed gid. a wnirTd more than was paid t& Welsh farmers. Mr. Barrel replied that it was all a question of quality. Sixty per cent. abo-ro pre-war prices was paid for all quaWties, but there" were mamy qualities. Welsh farmers who had been receiv- ing1 a uniform price had in some cases received more than they were entiled to and in other cases less as the quality varied. I WHERE DOES THE PROFIT GO? I The Chairman suggested that. millions of pounas were going into somebody's pocket's, judging by "he present price of manufactured wood and the price received by the Welsh farmers for the raw material. Mr. Barrett pointed out that only a small percentage of the wool was allowed to go into the factories for civilian use. All the Welsh country factories that were able to take up Government contracts were running fuU time. Mils manufacturing for civilian trade had to pay more for tlio wool than the farmers were receiving no doubit. Free wool was worth any Prico--t-here was no free wool, because the Government had got the monopoly. If manu- facturers obtained their supplies at a lower price they would not reduce their prices, and khere would be no benefit to the fanners. A delegate said whaft was wanted was that the farmers should be able to take their wool to the ffudfcory, havo it made into cloth, and pay the owner of the factory for the service. To this Mr. Barretrt, replied that the privilege of doing this had been withdrawn because it "Vas very much abused. Another delegate remarked that the farmers who lived in the bills of Walas ouight to get the best material in their clothing. MT. Barrertt: There are not many termers here who have Welsh wool in their ootø-they baive. better wool, which costs more money. A vote of thanks was passed to Mr. Barrett, and the Council decided to proceed direct to I the Treasury wiifch their demand for the 100 per cent. increase in pre-war prices. [ MAN-POWER QUESTION. I I The next question dealt with that of the can. | ing up of farm hands for the Army, as to which a deputation interviewed Mr. IJoyd George some weeks ago, when instructions were given that no more men were to be called up until after the harvest. A long and vigorous discussion took place on the deputation's report, and "the resolutions sent in for consideration by many of the branches. Froni the Merioneth branch a reeolution asked that the War Council should still be pressed to -liberate from the Army the young men called up since May 1, so that they may return to their work on the land; also that the union should urge upon the Government not to remove any more men from the land and poiirt out that if they were. farmers would be obliged to -2f-.z&b to comply with «he Board of Agriculture's orders to till the land they were asked to till in 1918, The council adopted this resolution with the alteration of diate from May 1 to Mav 24. and the substitution of the words will be unable" instead of "will be obliged to refuse" to oomiply with ithe bo&r&a require- ments. Qaptain Caradoc Davies, of the National Ser- vice Department, who attended the meeting at the request of Lord Treowen addressed the dele- gates on the man-power -question. MEAT TRADE QUESTIONS. I Mir. Arthur Simmons. of th Ministry of Food, giave an address on the subject of the slaught- ering of cattle and sheep and the basis on which they are valued and paid for. Owing to the x rationing of food, he said it was essefitial that the Ministry shoiild conltrol the supply of meat th roughout, and though the valuation of cattle and sheep was done at present on both the live weight and the dead weight basis, the latter seemed mosHj acceptable to the farmers, as it was the more fair generally speaking. It was hoped gradually to adopt the dead weight system gen- erally, and for that purpose suitably-placed slaughter-houses were required. Oattle as well a,s sheep, were already being valued on this basis at over 80 daughteT-houses, With a view to. ob- taining the confidence of the farmers, it was pro- posed that they ahould form co-operative societies to open and manage slaughter-houses themselves. A scheme for this purpose (which Mr. Simmons read to the meeti?) co?d be &"ted forthwith, and would be 'se1f-ortinK on a minimum of twenty beaats a week, or the proportionate num- ber of sheep. The farmers would have full con- trol, they would satisfy themselves that their meait was properly weighed and identified, and they would have the benefit of all the offal. Of course, the subsequent disposal of the meiat and offal would rest on the Ministry. The system could only be started in centres where the mea-t could be dealt with in the surrounding .district. Incidentally, Mr. Simmons expressed the opinion that very ishortl-y the retail price of meat would have to be increased to ?he consumer by 2d? a. pound, but this would make no difference to ?e nriœ which the f&nneM would receive. T8e increase was due to American requirements. To meet the weekly requirements the Ministry of Food had to provide 46,000 tons of meat every week. A number of questions were pufc ifco and answer- ed by Mr. Simmoof, to yrh-om a rate of thank* (Continued at bottom of next ccfcrnmj

WELSH FARMRSIOIlj

waa passed. The present system of rationing, he said, was a wartime measure, but it would probably have tto continue for a course of years after the war, and no doubt we dhotad nom ftIIo turn to t&e old system in ita •jmjwtnr.

1 HE ROLL OF HONOUR

1 HE ROLL OF HONOUR. OFFICERS. KILLED. Wolryob,e-Whitume, Lieut. Philip Malcolm, R.F.A. Lieut. Woiryche-Wibitmore, killed lu action, was only surviving soa of Mr. M. Wolryche-Wiaitmore, TJfford Sail, Stamford, and nephew of Lieut.-Col. F. A. VYolryche-Whitmors, Budmastoa Hall. Zr. i nortb. WOU30DKIX Kenyon, 2nd Lieut. W. P. Major Eustace K-enyon, Shrewsbury, has receives an intimation from the War Office that his son, 2nd Lieut. Ken/on, Wel&h Fusiliers, was admitted to the General Hospital, Genoa, on August llth, suffering from gunshot wound to the left thigh. Lieut. Kenyoja's condition was said to be good. PRISQSTEJt OF WATt. Lee Warner, Lieut. R W., Surrey Regt. Lieut. Lee-Warner, who is a son of the late SIr Wm, Lec-Wainer, a member of the Indian Council, Whitehall, and nephew oi Mr. W. Holland, Chief Constable of Montgomeryshire, was reported miss- ing after the Cambraix push in the spring. The first tidings of him were only received last Thurs- day, when a letter came to his mother from him stating th., t, was a prisoner in German hands and unwounded. before the Cambrai' affair he had acted as a.n Interpreter with the British Expedi. tionary Force in 'taly. NC.O'S. AND MEN. KILLED. Clutton, Pte. Joseph, B. W .F. Mrs. Clutton, Church-street, Llangollen, has re- ceived official intimat'on from the War Office that her husband, Private Joseph Clutton, has been killed in action in France on the 12th inst. Be was a native of Cefn Ji&wr, and was employed at Peuybont terra cotta works. Roberts, Gunner George A. Grnner George A. Boberta, son of Mr. aad hirli. J Roberts, Calch, Minera, has been killed in action. REPORTED MISSING, NOW KILLED. Hodge, Private T., R. W .F. Mrs. Hodge, 22, High-street, Welshpool, has re- ceived intimation that the Army Council conclude that her son, Pte. T. 12. Hodge, who was reported missing in Palestmej on March 26, 1917, is now dead. Pte. Hodge enlisted in the R.W.F. in Feb. 1815, and with his brother, Cpl. Cecil Hodge, who was wounded at the Dardanelles and at Gaza, went out to the Wast with the regiment. Pte. T. E. Hodge was missing as reported, and Corpl. Cecil Hodge is still on service out there. Their father C-6.i. Hodge, is an instructor of musketry on the East Coast. DIED OF WOUND8. Horton, Pte. James. Hereford Regt. Pte. Horton (fourth son of Mr. W. Horton, Laurel Terrace, Meole Brace, Shrewsbury), who has died of wounds at Rouen, had been wounded once before in the back. and seriously wounded the second time in the neck and shoulder. He enlisted tn Nov. 1914. in the K.S.L.I., but was transferred to the Cheshire Regt., and sent to Egypt. and while out there was transferred to the Herefords. He was in Egypt 18 months, and was drafted to France a month before he was wounded. Prior to the war he was employed by L. and N.W.R. Co. Lloyd, Pte. Geoffrey Frederick Horatio, attached Somerset L'ght Infantry. News has come to hand of the death on Aug. 2, from wounds received in action of Pte. Lloyd, only son of the late Mr. W. H. Lloyd and Mrs. Lloyd. Grove House, TSllesmere. Pte. Lloyd came from India in Nov. 1914, with the XA.L.I. to go to France, and has been through much fighting on the Western Front. having been wounded three times, and suffered from fever and shell shock. He was gassed in June, and was discharged from hospital in Francs only a fortnight before he met with his death. He was 26 years of age. I Bowen. Pte. M., R.S.L.I. Mrs. J. Williams, 28, Chapel Street. Wem, has received an 'ntimation from Pte. Bowen (who was reported missing March 23-26). stating that he is a prisoner of war In Germany and unwounded. Cadman, Pte. Albert, K.6.L.I. Pte. Cadman, husband of Mrs. Cadman, 8, St. Michael's Terrace, Castle Fore gate, Shrewsbury, who was reported missing, has written home to his wife stating that be a a prisoner of war ia Germany. < Davies, Gunner John Henry, R.F.A. Pte. Dexter, sou of Mrs. Dexter, Castle Fields, Shrewsbury, 's a prisoner of war in German hands. Griffiths, Corpl. Percy, K.S.L.I. Corpl. Griffiths, son of lIra. Griffiths, 1, Bell Pass- age, Castle 1etegate,e Shrewsbury, repofted miss- ing in France on March 21, has now written horns stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany amd well. T/adsworth, Pte. Eric. Pte. Eric Wadswoorth, Johnstown, who was re- ported (u)Mwg last May, has forwured information to his friend: at Johnstown that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. Pte. Wadsworth is the youngest son of Mr. F. w. ttaosworth, Belgrave Terrace, Johnstown, and is only nineteen years of age. Winfield, Sergt. John, Cheshire Regt. (late D.H.Y.). Seirgt. Wlnfleld was reported missing March 23rd, but he has written stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany and, well. PriQt to joining the D.H.Y., three years ago, Sergt. Winileld was em. 7 ployed at Messrs., James-Baker and sons, Wrexham. MISSING -1 ll5BING Bvamon, Pte. G., Cheshire Regt. Mr. and Mrs. Evansom, Edstaston, Wem, have received a notification from their son, pte. Evan- ion, who has been missing since the German offen- sive of March 21, that he is well and a prisoner of war in Germany. His commanding officer in a previous letter to the parents reporting him as missing states that he had been awarded the Mil- itary Medal. Before enlistment Pte. Branson was employed by Mr. J. G. Overall, farmer. Lacon. Harris, Pte. G., 6.W.B. Pte. Harris officially reported missing ia France Ajjril 10 (unofficially reported wounded in the head) is husband of Mrs. Harris, Farm Cottages, Castls Fields, Shrewsbury, who will be glad to hear from comrades or others particulars concerning him. Jerrvis, Pte. Stanley R., R. W.F. Pte. Jervis, reported wounded and missing at the battle of Gasa on the Palestine front, has not since been heard of and it is feared has died of wounds. He was son of Mrs. Jervis, Bank House, Trewern, and had been In the army since the first month of the war. He was formerly employed in Leighton Gardens. WOUNDED. Leighton, Signaller J. A., Cheshire Regt. M.r. Leighton, lecoyd,, has received official inform- ation that his son, Signaller Leighton, was wounded in action on the morning of the 29th July, in the face with a shell. He is now iu Manchester ia hospital, and Is going on as well as can be expected. He had. been in France twelve months, and doss much tignaning. He holds a aMC-el?M si&&Uing eerttCMte won in T?DUMe.