Collection Title: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
8 articles on this page
WHEN THE HUNS BROKE THROUGH

WHEN THE HUNS BROKE THROUGH. ON THE HAZEBROUCK SECTOR, 9 (By a Returned Soldier). When the G-armans had failed in their March offensive in icis either to capture Amiens or to open the road to Paris, they turned their attention to the Channel Ports, and if they could have captured Hazebrouck, a day later they might have secured St, Omer, and then in two days it would have been 'possible for them to have marched in triumph into Calais and Dunkirk, and perhaps to Boulogne also. It was a great temptation to them—a subtle allure- ment-and t-hey succumbed to the bait. They began their offensive in the Lys Valley on the morning of April 9th, with an attack on the Portuguese front, and the Portuguese gave way A terious breach was thus made in our northers defences, with very grave eoavsequonces. Divisions which had been fighting for days on end in the great southern battle had to be l'urried northwards in order to stop the enemy, who was already o^r-ranning our defences there. Our division was one of them. But on this occasion we nicved without our artillery, which was for the time being doing magnificent work with the Third Army, no* many miles south o? Arras. Sleeping on the roadside at Tincques on ine night of April 10th, our troops were waiting -o be conveyed by bus to the northern sector in the Hazebrouck district, barring the way into the forest of Nieppe. We passed through Merville, already under shell fire-and showing much damage, on the morning of April 11th. The Germans were in the town in the evening. < We were now in the Fifteenth (io-rps of the Second Army, and our division took up a position north-west of Neuf Berquin jlii^extending some distance in front of Vieux Berquin, and our fearless dispatch rider reported a battalion of British wounded in the former village, with the Germans fast approaching it. We witnessed very painful scenes in coming into this new war zone, and it filled one with sorrow to see broken-hearted refugees hastily making their way from the danger zone. Where possible they were carried by British transport, but there was very little of that available. Young children, with tired feet and sad, woebegone faces, snatched like a brand from the burning, were following their mothers, car- rying only a few precious possessions they had gathered in haste. Here was an aged, devoted daughter, wheeling her ancient mother sitting on a chair fastened on a wheelbarrow and looking like 1;1 phantom disturbed from her last resting place. Scores and scores of both sexes and all ages hurried by with blanched faces and panting breath, some driving cattle before them and others carrying hand- .n d c-thets carrying hand- kerchief bundles of personal belongings—one long procession of sadness and despair. It was an agonis- ing spectacle! A daughter of France wished U3 good luck as the boys went forth to battle and called down heaven's vengeance on the Portuguese who had deserted the trenches and sought safety in cellars, where women and children, protected only by gallant British gunners, had gone to escape the enemy's gun- are. Close by, a Frenchman, waiting till the last moment of freedom from danger had passed, shut- tered up his house and cycled away out of reach of bursting shells. Thus our division was enabled to gain contact with the advancing hosts of Germany. On April llth, ;'11 the evening, our division carried out a stirring counter-attack and re-captured the villages of La Becque and Le VerrieT, inflicting sang- uine loss on the enemy, and helping to steady the troops on the neighbouring battle-front. During the next two days news came trickling through of the gallant stand which was being made, and how the Guards were sacrificing themselves in order to gain time for the Australians to be detrained at Haze. brouck. These were momentous days, critical in the highest degrees, for the enemy must be held at all costs. Only one battery, as far as I could see was available behind Vieux Berquin at this time, and for 48 hours they .spat out fire and death notwithstand- ing the concentrated attack on them by several enemy batteries. It was an heroic battery. It was tfhe paucity of batteries on our side that made the fighting so severe for -ur machine-gunners and rifle- men, who knew the danger and gave their life-s blood to save our country from the disaster which threatened to overwhelm it. Seven villages were fired by the enemy's heavy rain of shells, and there was no question of our remaining in them long; they iioon became untenable. On April 12th, while our troops were fighting hard, it was thought expedient to destroy the important railway frbm Bailleul to Hazebrouck, which ran behind Vieux Berquin, and this work was carried cut by our Royal Engineers, who soon made the rails unserviceable and not easily repairable; not imitating the fault of the Germans, who usually left a dump of serviceable rails in close proximity to those they destroyed. The enemy followed up his attacks with great vigour on April 13th, and ip hi8 dispatches on this red-letter day in the annals of our history, Sir Douglas Haig says: The 29th and 31st Divisions, now greatly reduced in strength by the severe tlght- iug already experienced and strung our, over a front1 of nearly 10,000 yards east of the Foret de Nieppe, were once more tried to the utmost. Behind them the first Australian Division was in process of de- training, and the troops were told that the line was tll be held at all costs, until the detrainment could be completed. During the morning, which was very foggy, several determined attacks, in which a Ger- man armoured car came into action against the 4th Guards Brigade on the southern portion of our line, were repulsed with great loss to the enemy. After i the failure of these assaults, he brought up field guns to point blank range, and in the northern sector j with their aid gained Vieux Berquin. Everywhere ex- 1 cept at Vieux Berquin, the enemy's advance was held I up all day by desperate fighting, in which our ad. 1 vanced posts displayed the greatest gallantry, main- taining their ground when entirely surrounded, men ) standing back to back in the trenches and shooting in tront and rear. ) • In the afternoon of April ISth, the enemy made a further determined effort, and by sheer weight of numbers forced his way through the gaps in our depleted line, the surviving garrisons of our posts fighting where they stood to the last with bullet and bayonet. The heroic resistance of these troops, how- ever, had given the leading brigades of the 1st Aus- tralian Division time to reach and organise their ap- pointed line east of the Foret de. Nieppe. These now took up the fighting and the way to Hazebrouck was definitely closed. The performance ot all the troops engaged in this most gallant stand, and especially that of the 4th Guards Brigade, on whose front of 1 some 4,000 yards the heaviest attacks fell, is worthy of the highest praise. No more brilliant exploit has I taken place since the opening of the enemy's offens- ive, though gallant actions have been without number. » » it The action of these troops, says the Field Marshal, iad indeed of all the divisions engaged in the fight- mg in the'Llys Valley, is the more noteworthy be- cause practically the whole of them had been brought, straight out of the Somme battlefield where they had suffered severely and had been subjected to a great strain. All these divisions, without adequate rest and filled with young reinforcements which they had had j no time to assimilate, were again hurriedly thrown into the fight and, in spite of the great disadvantages under which they laboured, succeeded in holding up j the advance of greatly superior forces of fresh troops. j » I Thus the enemy's bid for the ChanneJ j ports wu frustrated, and no further serious j attempt was made by them on this sector, j though they made it a warm, tight little •omer fm wmva moutba Wl they ?ere amaUy drt?n ( back through the Lys Valley into Belgium and across1 the Phine I have seen the Guards on their parade grounds m the Tower of ",don and in St. James's Barracks; I havt. seen them going on night duty to the Bank of England, I nave seen them march paat Buckingham Palace in brigades; I have seen them doing guard at the Royal Palace and in posts of honour, and they have mpressed me as the smart- est body of men for show in the world. But on the field of battie they have proved their worth and covered themselves with distinction. They are FJng- land's pride and England's gfory. This is no dis- i paragement to other battalions of English troops. and troops from our overseas dominions who have fought with equal courage and bravely; but I am I speaking of the men with whom I came la closest j contact, and I rasc my hat to them. j » n On Saturday, April ISth, we were relieved by the j Australians, and that night we fell back to Borre. j The night was pitcn dark, and a raw fog came ozMt We were out in a field without shelter, and as w had no quartermaster or his departmental staff with us, I was put in charge of the stores, which con- sisted of bully and biscuits. My heart ached for tbo, boys who had to be fed on this stuff, after working hard all day ir. the line. but it was all that we had, not even a drink of tea for them, so they had to resort to their water bottles. Here and there a, candle sputtered, but there were soon shouts of: ''lights out," for "Jerry" was up. It has an awful significance; it may mean death to us, for he is;, nearly overhead and a score of field searchlights are j fixing him. Tracer bullets run up the shafts of light 's like a lot of fairy angels running up to heaven. With bated hreath we whisper: Will he drop all his j bombs or will he carry them where he had intended j to deliver them? He carries them away, and we i breathe freely once more! 'Tis midnight, I take my i boots off, wrap my blanket round me and put my overcoat over me, and lie down to sleep. I am tired. j About two o'clock I am wakened by a tug at my blanket, and I raise myself, and shout out What's J the matter?'" No answer. The figure has slid away i in the darkness. As I cannot find my overcoat I I bawl out for the culprit to bring it back to me. I j cannot afford to lose it, so I grope about for my boots with the intention of chasing some unknown j warrior. As, however, I found my coat a few yards away I gave up the idea of a chase, and was settl- ing myself down again, when an elderly officer c.-me up and lectured me for making a row. Sileace is cce of the golden virtues of a good soldiexl This dear officer, whom I am sorry to say had .0 be sent away next day because of a mental breakdown, was only searching for a blanket—but that was my blanket, and the only one I had! Sleep deserted me, and cold and shivering I moved off a few hours later to the little village of Hondeghem, which is overlooked by the town of Cassel and the famous monastery of Mont de Cats. 4 •* Then for two days we had roast pork for dinner. Some porkets strayed into our luarters, End we had {a butcher, and that butcher had a knife, so the rest was easily accomplished. We rext went into some huts on a railway siding, but the German gunners soon got the range of it, and we" -left," with two parting shots falling within 20 yards of the column as we marched down the road, where a mile away we passed -by a farmyard in which eight of our how- j itzers-for the guns had now begun to arrive—were working uncaraouflaged, and eight shots in rapid succession fell somewhere in the enemy lines. It the vibration and noise split our ears, it mattered not; tl.ere was joy in our hearts at the knowledge that guns and still more guns were coming to the aid of our gallant infantrymen and machine-gunners, hold- ing the enemy at bay, and preventing his march on the Channel ports of France.

BORDER MILITARY HONOURS

BORDER MILITARY HONOURS. I MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL. Regt.-Sergt.-Major J. J. Whitney, 4th Bn., K.S.L.I., 14, Arundel Road, Oswestry. Pes- ] viously to the outbreak of war he was Colour- Sergt.-Instr. to H (Oswestry) Co., of the above battalion, and went out with them to the Far East. Recently he has been R.S.M. to the Res. Bn. at Pembroke Dock, and is nt present at home on leave. Sergt. Courtney, of the Army Veterinary Corps, stud groom for the Earl of Powis at Powis Castle, Welshpool, before he enlist s! early in the war. MENTIONED FOR SERVICES. Among the names brought to the notice of I the Secretary of State for War, for valuable services rendered during the war, is that of Mrs. G. Chamberlain, wife of Capt. G. Chamberlain, Indian Army, and daughter of Capt. and Mrs. G. Edwards, late of The Glen, Shrewsbury. Mrs. Chamberlain -.s a granddaughter of the late Mr. G. Evans, corn merchant, Oswestry, and is holding a respon- sible position \yith the Army Pay Dept., Not- tingham. DEPARTMENT OF THE ADJUTANT- GENERAL. Mr. A. W. Berridge, No.2 Infantry Reco.d Office, Shrewsbury. Mrs. A., E. Wren, No. 2 Infantry Record Office, Shrewsbury. M'ss R. F. B. Lloyd-Mostyn.

i I Military Appointments

I Military Appointments. Bt. Lt.-Col. J. R. M. Minshull-Ford, D.S.O., M.C., R.W.Fus., who formerly lived at Otele'v House, Wrexham, is gazetted Brig.-Commd:, attd. to Headquarter Units, and to be temp. Brig.-Gen. whilst so employed, Jan. 18.

FOOTBALLI

FOOTBALL, NORTH WALES ALLIANCE SENIOR CUP. RHOS v. CHIRK.—The first match for over four years took place at Rhos on Thursday, before a large I crowd of spectators. Rhos opened strongly and were quickly two goals up, but 'Chirk equalised through ptlties, and the teams crossed over all square. j Chirk improved ir the second half and Stanley Davies scon made matters safe for Chirk by adding thre? goals, making the result Chirk 5, Rbus 2. Refer,  Mr. D. T. Lodwick, Oswestry. ELLESMERE V OSWESTRY. A keenly-contested but pleasant game took place at Eliesmefe on Saturday week. Having the advantage of the wind in the opening half, the visitors led at the interval by 2-0, the scorers being Lincoln and Wynn. It was an exciting second half, the play being more even. The visiting backs defended well against the wind, but the home forwards got through on three occasions. The visitors also scored three timee (one being a penalty), all obtained by H. Hughes. The final score read, Oswestry 5 goals. Ellesmere 3. The Oswestry team was; J. H. Mills; Morris and Hughes; H. Carlton, R. Richards and Jones; J. I.iI&ooJD. Wynn, Eke, H. Hughes end Clarke.

No title

Full and complete recognition has been I conceded to the fcailway Clerks' Association.

GENERAL MEETING I I

GENERAL MEETING, I The 104th ordinary general meeting of the Cambrian Railways Company was held at the Euston Hotel. London, on Friday week, when Mr. T. CraveBfe acting chairman, presided, and there were also present Lord Kenyon, Mr. C. B. O. Clarke. Mr. Alfred Herbert, aod Sir Joseph Davies, M.P. (directors), Messrs. J. Fraser and C. Fox (auditors), Messrs. S. Herbert O. S. Holt, L. H. A. Pratt, P. F. Wood (stockholders), j Mr. S. Williamson, secretary and general man- ager, Mr. W. K. Minsh&ll, solicitor, Mr. G. C. Macdonald, engineer, Mr. R. Williamson, ac- countant, Mr. S. G. Vowles, assistant secretary. --The Chairman, at the outset, expressed regret i fQT the absence through illness of Lord Powse ?d Maior David Davies, while Lord Herbert ne-Tempest was also absent owinr to being i eh?&Ked on other business. Prweeding to del with the affairs of the company, he referred with regret to the death of Lord Micbelham and mentioned that 447 of their men joined the forces, 41 having lOlSt their lives and 5 others being missing. They would provide a perman- ent memorial for those who had given their lives to their country. One man was mentioned in despatches and five were awarded the Military Medal. Arising out of the war the company handled very heavy traffic including the move- ment of troops and of coal and timber. None of the Cambrian rolling stock was sent abroad, but they were able to assist their neighbours with engines and vehicles, and their goods trains had been running through regularly to Crewe, and, during the last year or two of the war, to Shrewsbury also. They would realise the im- mense strain entailed on Mr. Williamson, his staff and all the men employed in so efficiently dealing I with this enormous traffic and would joirt- with him in congratulating them on their success. He I mitrht tell them that the authorities had re- peatedly thanked the company for what they bad done. l THE REPORT. I Dealing with the report and accounts, the Chairman said there had been no alteration in the arrangement with the Government. The I debit balance on Capital Account now amounted j to on?y £ 1,677 7s. lOd. The total net revenue | for the year was ?144.079 &s compared with I £ 148,182 in 1917. the dinerence being due to the fact that they had placed £ 5,000 to the Depred- ation Fund out of 1918 net revenue. The direct- ors did not propose adding to the General Re- serve Fund this year, but, after consultation with the auditors, recommended the payment of 2 per cent, on the No. 1 Preference Stock for 1918. The Depreciation Fund now amounted to 249,080 la. 6d., the General Reserve Fund to 231,000 .trid the reserve from traffic receipts for bad (lebto and special contingencies to £14,96048. 3d., and the company was to be congratulated that their position was so sound. Their cash balance amounted 'to £ 5.091 4s. 3d. while they had in- vested in Treasury Bills £40.000 and ir, War Lotan L23,944 13s. Id.. and had paid B6,000 for two! new engines. Miscellaneous accounts showed an increase of some £10.000 due principally to In- come Tax charges on profits. Stock of materials showed an increase of about 240,000 due chiefly to higher prices. A FIRST DIVIDEND. This was the first occasion on which they had been able to recommend a dividend on No. 1 Preference Stock, and was the best indication of the improvement which had taken place in the company's position during the last five years. Through the operation of the old Suspense Ae- count. formed in 1909, they had wiped out old debts amounting to about C65,000, and only £ 1.607 5a. 1.0d. remained outstanding in respect of renewal of Barmouth Bridge. Had the pre- war conditions substantially remained the out- look of the corn??ny was ?Lrt:cu!arly hnght. With reard to the future re?tions o?he *v- ernment and the railway the Chairman proceed- jj ad to outline statements which have already ap- peared in the Pmss. Th,? eight hours day would as far as could be see-n involve an increase of ) wages of 230,000 per annum to the company. FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS. I It was very gratifying to observe the present I relations existing between the company and those living and trading on the line, ad he was glad to notice that the local councils were taking up very actively plans for the future developments, and especially for the promotion of new indus- tries in towns adjacent to the line. He con- cluded by moving the adoption of the report, which was seconded by Mr. C. B. O. Clarke. Mr. P. F. Wood congratulated the directors, shareholders and staff on the present position of the oompany., The company was now in a much better and safer financial position than it was formerly. With regard to the permanent way. he pointed out that there had been heavy I wear and tear during the war, and he hoped the directors had ample reserves in hand to enable them to put the line in a thoroughly good con- j dition and for the replacement of rolling stock, j He hoped the little companies, of which they were one, would continue to prosper and again i congratulated all concerned on the present I position of affairs. Mr. Pratt said it must not be overlooked that I the preferenct shareholders, under schemes of arrangement with the company and under Acts of Parliament, had certain rights, and now that j the armistice was signed they felt that the mat- ter might be dealt with. Accordingly, he had addressed a letter to Mr. Williamson, in which he pointed out that during the last four years j some £ 60,000 to £70,000 had been placed to re- serve. As. a result he had received a visit from Mr. Williamson, and he would like to acknow- ledge the frank and kindly way in which he met him and told him everything that he wanted to know and abo a great deal that he was not aware of. He had never met Mr. Williamson before, and was very proud to make his ac- quaintance. He would hke publicly to express the opinion that the company waa exceedin-gly well favoured in having a man like Mr. William- son. (Applause). He thought much of the posi- tion in which they found themselves that day was due to the energy and ability of that gen- tleman. (Hear hear). He believed the present ample reserves and adequate earth balance was entirely due to the caution which the directors had adopted for the last fpur years. (Hear, hear). Although the directors, were paying a dividend at 2 per cent. shown in the accounts as amount- ing to £ 3,276 Us. 7d., as a. matter of fact the net cost of that dividend to the company waa some- thing under £ 2,300. The Chairman: After deduction of the tax. Mr. Pratt said yes; that is what he meant. I The future conditions of railways was quite un- certain and everything was very much in the air, but there was one thing upon which he was sure, I and that was that whatever the future might be the interests of the general body of shareholders must be reasonably and properly considered. He advocated the payment of more by-way of divid- end. because if the Government nationalised the railways they would be more likely to have re- gard to dividends actually paid than earned. He therefore suggested that the directors should pay the 2 per cent. dividend not as for the last year but ae for the last six months of the year so that i the directors might, when they met next half- year, find themselves in the position, by perhaps j slightly retrenching on the amount placed to reserve, to declare a further 2 per cent. upon I the first Preference Stock. He also hoped that if the present prosperity wu maintained, the I Board might be able to declare a small maiden dividend on the second Preference Stock. Mr. Sydney Herbert said there had often been a breeze when he went to railway meetings, but that day he could not feel even the slightest draught. (Laughter and applause). He joined in congratulating the directors on the result of the year's work. REPLIES TO POINTS. Before putting the resolution, the Acting Chair- man replied to various questions raiaed in the course of the meeting, and assured the share- holders that the directors had constantly before them the consideration of every possible ineana by which they could conduct economies consist- ent. of course, with efficiency. With regard to I rolling stock, duririg the war they had done everything possible to keep the line up to its pre-war condition, and would continue to go on doing so. Whenever the directors felt justified in paying a dividend upon stock he could assure them they would have the greatest satisfaction in doing so. It might be felt they were too conservative, but he con- sidered the policy they were following was a wise one. With regard to the suggestion that, in the event of the purchase or nationalisation of the railways the Government would be influenced by the amount of dividend paid, he was of opinion that the uctual eorniuiza of the railways would affect their decision. The resolution having been carried, unanimous- ly, the Acting Chaarman proposed the re-election of Mr. Charles Bridger Orme Clarke as a di- rector, Lord Kenyon seconding the resolution, which was unanimously adopted. Mr. Alfred Herbert was also re-elected a director, Mr. Charles Fox auditor, and, on the proposition of Mr. Oliver S. Holt, seconded by Mr. Pratt, and supported by Sir Joseph Daviee, K.B.E.. M.P., the Chairman was heartily thank- ed for presiding, Mr. Pratt stating that he would like to add thenarne of Mr. Williamson for they must all recognise 'his valuable services to the a company. He realised the heavy strain that must have fallen upon him in the difficult times through which they had been passing; and after his mterview with Mr. Williamson and what they had heard that day. he was quite in accord with the policy of the board and his confidence had greatly increased. (Cheers).

IOswestry Cricket Club I

I Oswestry Cricket Club. I I ANNUAL MEETING. The annual meeting of the resuscitated town cric- ket club was held in the Memorial Hall, Oswestry, on Monday umiing, when Mr. W. K. Minshall pre- sided over a representative attendance, which angured well for the future prosperity of the club. Apologies for non-attendance were received from Dr. J. P. Cartwright and Mr. W. H. O. Jeinmett. The hon. secretary, Mr. George Whitfield, gave a report of the recent whist drive and dance, which resulted in a sum of £ 44 13s. 6d. being raised for the club, and said their hearty thanks were due to all who had helped to achieve such a fine success. He had not sent out an appeal for financial help, be- cause he thought with the subscriptions received from members and vice-presidents, they would be able to run the club without having to appeal for outside support. Mr. Abraham Morris had agreed to rent them the cricket field for tl5 per year. ELECTION OF BEORETARY. Dr. R. Cartwright, in proposing that joint secTe- taries should be appointed, said he wanted to keep Mr. George Whitfield as secretary, but they could not ask him to undertake all the work, so be would propose that Mr. W. B. Broughall should act with him as joint hon. secretary.—Mr. Whitfield said he was sorry not to be able to do the secretary's work, but joint secretaries, in his opinion and experience, were not a success. He had been trying to flnd a shop assistant- to look after a Thursday league, but he bad failed to find such a man, and he felt very disappointed. He was perfectly willing, however, to get the club into working order if they could find a secretary to take on the work after May.—Mr. Broughall said he entirely agreed with the sentiments expressed by Mr. Whitfield. He was there to sup- port the club as far as he could, but he did not in- tend to play but little cricket as he was going in for all-round sport, and his heart would not be entirely with cricket. He was "hot free on Saturday mornings, when he thought the secretary would be required to look round tor the last six men of the team. (Laughtsr).1Âi: Subsequently, on the motion of Mr. J.<'Y. Jones, secrnded by Mr. B. Gough, Mr. W. G. Hunnit was appointed hon.-secretary, and he consented -to fill that position. OTHER APPOINTMENTS. Mr. W. B. Broughall, who signified his assent to the proposal, was elected hon. treasurer of the club. —Major A. Wynne Corrie was asked to become patron, and failing him Dr. Jr P. Cartwright was to be asked to fill that position.—The Mayor of Oswestry, Mr. W. Morris, according to time-honoured custom, was chosen, president of the club.—Over 40 gentlemen were appointed vice-presidents. The following wero elected as the working committee.— Dr. R. Cart- wright, Messrs. J. V. Jones, B. Gough, A. England, W. K. Minshall, R. 0. Davies, 0. H. Beaman, G. Wliitfield, C. Bason and A. Hyslop. The Rev. A. O- Roberts, Dr. Cartwright and, Messrs. B. Gough, Lewis Edwards, A. England and R. O. Davies were appointed the- match committee. Mr. B. Gough was chosen captain of the first eleven, and Mr. A. England vice-eaptain. The arrangement of the fixtures was Jeit in the hands of Mr. Geo. Whitfield, who said he hoped to popularise the club by fixing up matches between the assstants of various shops in the town.

Advertising

I Remarkable Cures of Paralysis. True Stories of Helpless Sufferers brought back to Health by Dr. Cassell's Tablets. Nerva Paralysis. Mrs. King, 10, Monteith-stieet; Glasgow, says: I lost use of left side and my health and ,nerves were all wrong. I had a sort of stroke and lost all power of movfement. I got Dr. Cas. eell'a Tablets, and power gradually returned un- til 1 was quite cured." Infantile Paralysis, Baby Clarke suffered from Spinal Paralysis; she was helpless and wasting away, and could not sit up. Nothing did her good. She soon picked up after taking Dr. Case ell's Tablets, and is now a-strong, healthy girl, says Mrs. Clarke, 20. Bestwood Colliery, Notts. Paralysed in Legs. Mr. Bouchard, 2, Monto-i-road, Walworth, London, says:—" After rheumatic fever I could not move: I had no feeling in my limbs. Hos- pital was suggested, as nothing did me good, but I got Dr. Casseii's Tablets and gradually gained lost power. I am quite cured." Dr. Cassell's Tablets are the perfect modern home remedy fox Nervous Breakdown, Nerve and Spinal Paralysis, Malnutrition, Wasting, Antemia, Sleeplessness, Indigestion, Kidney Disease, and Premature Decay. Specially suit- able for nursing mothers and women of middle age. Sold by chemists and stores in all parts of the world. Prices Is. 3d. and 3s., the 5s. size being the more economical. Free information on any case sent on request. Dr. Casaell's Co., Ltd.. Chester-rd., Manchester.