Collection Title: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 6 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
12 articles on this page
HARNESSING THE DEE I

HARNESSING THE DEE. I A FAR-REACHING SCHEME. 1 An interesting report has just "been issued by Mr. S. E. Britton (electrical engineer to the Chester Corporation) upon the practic- ability of developing the water power of the river Dee for the generation of electricity, and the feasibility of utilising such power for agricultural purposes, and the general im- provement of country life. Mr. Britton states that the investigations for the subject under consideration included an inspection of the river from Llangollen to Chester, and the survey of many sites for weirs and power houses. The River Dee rose in Bala Lake, Merionethshire, which is fed by a number of small streams.. Leaving the lake it follows a north-easterly course to Cor- wen, turns there and continues east by touth past Llangollen to the junction of the River Ceiriog, where it turns to the north-east on to ft point past Bangor-on-Dee, then bends north to Chester, and thereafter through an estuary into the Irish Sea. The Dee from Bala Lake f to Chester Weir has a total length of 76 miles. It leaves Merionethshire a distance of 20 miles I IrQm. Bala Lake, and it forms the boundary of Denbighshire and Shropshire for three miles, the boundary of Denbighshire and a detached part of Flintshire for 14.75 miles, Denbighshire and Cheshire for 12.75 miles, and on through Cheshire for a distance of eeven miles to Chester. The length of river frontage in each of the five counties through which the Dee flows is :—Merionethshire, 43 miles; Denbighshire, 64.5 miles; Shropshire, 3 miles; Flintshire, 14.75 miles; and Che- = ishire, 26.75 miles. ELECTRICITY FOR AGRICULTURE. I Regarding the area for the supply of elec- trical energy, the report states that for agri- cultural purposes 50,000,000 units per annum ,would serve the requirements of about 800 square miles, that area being equivalent to a belt of land 15 miles wide of each side of the river from Llangollen to Chester. But as there are other interests near the river which are aJso deserving of a supply, this scheme would probably render the greatest national service by restricting it within a strip of land an each side of the river three to five miles fat width, representing about 200 square miles. The advantage in favour of the smaller area is that lengthy transmission lines would be is that leanngd t? distribution could be economic- a,U1 effected without the use of step-up trans- formers. In reference to the possibilities of the scheme, it is pointed out that there is little doubt that the method of development tinder consideration could be extended up to [ Bala, and to a lesser extent along the principal tributaries of the Dee. The valley contams milch excellent agricultural land, which by the aid of electrical energy could be prepared and worked more economically and expeditiously to yield more abundant chops than is possible with the present methods in vogue. The existing railways from Bala to Ruabon and <• iWrexham to Ellesmere, could be electrified. iThe roads from Bala to Chester on each side and adj acent to the Dee could be used as main arteries for transport and for the general v industrial development of the valley. The roads could be equipped with a subsidiary electrical system of transportation to inter- connect the townships en route, and act as feeders to the nearest railway. They could be lighted throughout their length and suit- able strips of land on the side of the thorough- fares used for the power transmission line al- Jocoted to the development of industries. THE COST. I k The main transmission line, capable of transmitting 1,000 k. W. 's. (remarks "r. Britton) would cost approximately £800, per mile, that is 948,800, and transmission lines from the several power stations to the i lain arteries, approximately 27 miles at a cost of 4&600 per mile would cost £ 16,200. The total estimated cost of these main transmission lines would therefore be £ 65,000. The average cost > of the installations is estimated at £ 29,700. h The cost of cutting a tunnel or tunnels, cap- able of conveying 50,000 cubic feet of water per minute to installation No. 12 is estimated '• at £ 60,000, making the total estimated cost for the sixteen installations and main trans- mission lines £600,200. INTEREST AT LLANGOLLEN. I A TRIO OF INTERVIEWS. Interest has been aroused at Llangollen by the publication of the proposals embodied in the re- > port presented to the Board of Agriculture f and Fisheries by the electrical engineer of the Chester Corporation reg-arding- the development v, of the River Dee for the generation of electrical energy, and more particularly by that part of the scheme that concerns the sacredstrearo • in the Llangollen valley. A special correspondent who has; visited. the locality, an d obtained the views of representa- tive public men. found in all cases that the mat- ter of outstanding concern was as to the aesthetic results that might follow in the train of any such an undertaking. The conservation of the beauty of the scenery in the Vale of Llangollen was held on all hands to bo of paramount importance. Once it was shown that this is by no means likely to be menaced they are prepared heartily to ■f welcome proposals of industrial development, but only then. Mr. Harvey Birch, chairman of the Urban Council, eaid that should the project materialise >- it niigIA mean the economic salvation of the dis- troct. A cheap and abundant supply of electricity, for power and illumination, would achieve great things at Llangollen, amid whose beautiful hills there were reputed to be materials that would sibun-dantly repay efforts at development. Mr. C. E. Crawford, of the Llangollen Town Improvement Association, said he was abfo.utely in favour of the project as outlined. Like many other people he was deeply enamoured vvith the iaaiurIal charms of the Dee Valley at Llangollen, and would reeiet to the utmost anything that tnight have a tendency to despoil it. At the lama time. he was fully convinced that, without detracting in the least from the scenic beauties of the valley, its industrial resources and new jjossibilities "might be readily sloped if orly an abundance of power, at cheap tares, were available. Mr. E. Foulkes Jones, clerk to the urban Council, said that he had seen iiiany sonunes oomo and go at Llangollen and fail r^caase to cheap power was available. In the proposal of Mr. Britton he saw great hopes for t he indus- trial development of the district. Such a pro- ject ought to be carried out without in any way impairing the (beauties of the fataous valley. He pointed out that the Llangollen Urban Council had already, in a small way, harnessed poitbmd at gcttom of Mxt column). -J

HARNESSING THE DEE I

I the Dee, or rather the undertaking that supplied the whole of the electricity for town illuminating | I purposes. They utilised the waters of the river to generate their current, and did not use an ounce of coal, and .gauges had been taken and surveys made that would lead to further exten- sion of the local project. They had more calls for current than they could supply; and in the big SQheme he saw vt possibilities of good so far M the ttMRoHen district w? c?BC«nMd.

Home Rule All Round I

Home Rule All Round. I THE WELSH STANDPOINT, I In the House of Commons, on Tuesday Major E. Wood, the Unionist member for Ripbn, moved: That with a. view tp enabling the Imperial Government to devote more attention to the general interests of the United Kingdom and in collaboration with the other. Governments of the, empire to matters of common imperial concern, this House is of opinion that the time has come for the creation of subordinate legis- latures within the United Kingdom, and that to this end, the Government, without prejudice to any proposals it may have to make with .regard to Ireland, should forthwith appoint a, Parlia- mentary body to consider and report- 1. Upon a measure of federal devolution ap.plica,ble to England, Scotland and Ireland, defined in its general outlines by existing differ- ences in law and administration between the three countries; 2, Upon the extent to which these differences are applicable to Welsh conditions and require- ments; and 3. Upon the financial aspects and require- ments of the measure." Sir R. J. Thomas said he was not altogether sure whether the time really had arrived for the discussion of this very important question. The hands of the Government had been very full, not in considering Home Rule, but in putting an end to German rule, and he would reiher, al- though a complete Home Ruler, have- seen the final and complete i-ettlement in regard to Ger- man rule before they turned their attention to the very great question of Home Rule. He had put down an amendment, although he would not move it, because he realised that the 'little country of Wales had been overlooked. The motion really dealt with Scotland and Ireland, and he thought he had a claim that the little country to which he belonged, gallant little Wales, had every right to be considered on a level with Scotland and Ireland. Wales had played no mean part in bringing the war to a triumphant conclusion—from the Prime Minister to the humble Tommy. There was the question of language. He did not think there were many Scotsmen there who could claim to be able to speak Gaelic. Although born Outside Wales, he had taken the trouble to learn his mother tongue, and could speaJk to that assembly in Welsh. (Laughter and hear, hear). There were few Welshmen who were not able to speak their mother tongue, whether they lived in JCngknd or Patagonia. There were thousands of families there who had their own Welsh chapels and hundreds of them who knew only the English and Spanish language. Nevertheless, there were no more loyal people to the British Empire than the Welsh people of Patagonia. He admitted that although Wales had a strong claim to Home Rule. it would be unreasonable to claim prefer- ential treatment. The Irish question miir-t first be settled. What he was anxious fpr-and what Wales should advocate strongly—was a Secretary of State for Wales, in order to co-ordinate the various departments that were being set up, such as health, insurance, housing, education and agriculture. That would make not only for the good of Walee, but for the benefit of the British Empire. Maior Ormsby-Gore said that if the confidence of the nations of the world was to Be retained in Parliamentary government it was of vital im- portance that this ancient Mother of Parliaments should release, not absolutely, but, in practice, a large measure of the control of administration, and of the legislative functions which it had hitherto performed. This would never be an Imperial Parliament until it had ceased to be a gas-and-water Parliament. On Thursday this House would consider a Bill to devolve from the highly centralized bureaucracy in India to eight subordinate Legislatures considerable powers over local questions, and if we were going to do that in India we should do the same at home. Speaking of the present procedure of the House, he said it was utterly impossible to expect mem- i bera to work 14 hours a day and do decent Work. and that was what the Government were askingr them to do. (Hear, hear). The greatest farce of SolI was the attempt of the House, by means of an Estimates Committee, to .get some control over exipenditure. The single triumph of the new rules of procedure was that they had re- duced the expenditure on the Lord Chancellor's bath. (Laughter and cheers). In the division 187 voted for the resolution and 34 against, majority for 153.

j Motor Charabanc Overturns

j Motor Charabanc Overturns. PASSENGERS LUCKY ESCAPE. A serious accident occurred on the Ruabon road near the "Sun," Trevor. on S:unday after- noon. A large motor charabanc belonging to the Acquitable Co-operative Society, Oldham, was full of passengers from Oldham, who had been on a trip to Llangollen. When between Sun Bank and Trevor a motor car, going in the same direction', tried to pass the charabanc, and for this purpose the driver of the charabanc, William Jackson, pulled the vehicle to the road side. As the motor car was passing: it caught the off front kerb of the charaJbanc, which knocked the steering gear out of the driver's control. The charabanc went into the ditch and smashed a telegraph pole. The vehicle then mounted the bank dividing the Toad from the canal and over- turned. Mr. W. Sherlock. Oldham. who was One of the passengers in the charabanc. was thrown lout and sustained a fracture to his right arm. He was attended by Dr. Drinkwater, Llangollen, and Dr. Bell, Livefpoo!. who was an occupant of the car which struck the charabanc. Later, he was conveyed to Llangollen Cottage HospitaJ, but was not detained. The other passengers proceeded on their journey in other charabancs whidh had visited Llangollen. but the damaged one is still hanging over the canal.

No title

A meeting of representative men was held at Cardiff on Friday, with a view to resuscitating the movement to secure the representation of Wales. on the Royal Arms and on the coinage of the United Kingdom. The Lord Mayor (Mr. A. C. Kirk) presided, and was appointed chairman of the movement, and Mr. W. Llewelyn Williams, K.C., who was also pres- ent, was made deputy chairman. The choice of the bearing to be placed on the fourth quarter of the Royal Standard and on the coinage will be left to this national conference, who will also be asked to appoint an influen- tial deputation representative of North and Soutli Wales to wait upon the Pripie Minister and the Lord President of the Counail. The Town Clerk of Cardiff (Mr. J. L. Wheatley) and Mr. Charles Morgan, B.A., were appoint- ed joinji hon. secretaries.

Motor Cycle Trials Sequel

Motor Cycle Trials Sequel. CONVICTION AT LLANGOLLEN. I At Llangollen Petty Sessions, on Monday, be- fore Lord Trevor and other magistrates, William Amos -.Rossen-all Brown, 5, Bayswa-ter-road, Hajidaworth, Birmingham, was- charged, by P.S. H. J ones with havilllldriven & motor Cycle at a dangerous speed in the town. Defendant, who did not appear, was represented by Mr. E. Foulkes Jones.-P.S. Jones stated that on May 18th defendant came down a hill and round a corner at a very. high speed. There was a lot of motor traffic about. and if defendant had met any other vehicle on the comer a serious accident would have occurred. In defence. Mr. Foulkes Jones said defendant's machine had got very over-oiled and he was travelling down hill on low gear.-—Defendant was fined R,5 and costs. H. W. Graesser Thomas, Riversdale, Ruabon, was charged by P.S. Jones with driving a motor cycle and side car recklessly at Grapes Hill, Llangollen, on May 18. Mr. G. M. G. Mitchell, Shrewsbury, appeared for defendant.—P.S. Jones said that from information he received he went to Graipes Hill, on May 18 and saw de- fondant there. He found an accident had taken place and questioned defendant, about it. De- fendant told him that he was descending the hill, and when he applied his brake the machine skid- died And toppled over. Two children had been knocked down, and defendant gave the child- ren's mot-her L2 to cover the injury to the child- ren and the clothing.—^Cross-examined.: He did not know official trials were being carried out at Allt-y-bady. There were a lot of motorists about. Witness arrived on the scene about 5 minutes after the accident. The children had their clothes torn, one had a bruised arm and the other a cut knee.—Mr. F. W. Roberta said he was coming down the Grapes Hill at the time together with his two children. He saw de- fendant's motor cycle coming behind him. He walked towards the footpath, and as soon as he stopped on the path the cycle knocked his child- ren down. The hill was very dangerous and defendant was on the wrong side of the road. Defendant told witness he did not know he had knocked anybody down, but gave witness's wife L2. The children, who were aged 3 and 7 years respectively, were walking on the rotd. and not on the foOtpath.Harold Dean also gave evidence and said, so far as the children were concerned. It was a pure accident.— Defendant said he was a manufact mng chemist. He had bèm driving for 10 veats and daily for the last 3 years. He had travelled over 6,000 miles on his present machine, and had never been summoned before. When he was descending Grapes Hill he picked up Mr. Digigory. He was travelling slowly on second gear. His machine was a 8-10 h.p. machine, which, 6n second gear, would only travel 18 to 20 miles an hour all out. At the spot where the accident occurred he (defendant) was actually stofpping in order to set Mr. Diggory down on the corner. Just when he was slowing down some flies got into his left eye, and in putting his hand to his eye 'he must have opened the throttle of his machine, which shot forward. He pulled the machine across the road. and. in doing so; it toppled over. If he had been travelling fast the machine would have suffered, but no damage was done except to bend a foot rest. The lamp wa.s not damaged and neither was the lamp glass broken. He did not see the children until after the accident, when the father told him he had knocked them down. He then gave the child- ren's mother L2 to cover the damoge.-Mr. L. C. Dijrgorv, who was riding on .■the back seat of defendant's machine, corroborated defendant's statement, and said the accident occurred about 30 yards from where defendant was going to put him down.—Defendant was fined £ 5. We understand that Mr. Graesser Thomas in- tends to appeal against the decision. ——— ———

I Llangollen Oddfellows

I Llangollen Oddfellows. I. ANNUAL MEETING OF DINAS BRAN LODGE. The iftnual msetiiie of the DinM Bran Lodge was held at the Club-room, Llangollen, on Satur- day, Mr. Francis Lewis, Berwyn, presiding. The Secretary submitted the annual report of the work done during the year, which showed that from the funds of the voluntary section J3165 18s. was distributed in 'sick pay and JB124 15o. 6d. in funeral allowances for members and members' children; that the capital was £ 4,574 19s. 8d. as compared .with £ 4,495 8s. 8d. at the beginning of the year, 8howina saving on the year of B79 H". The total membership of the voluntary section at the end of the year was 279 as compared with 290 at the beginning of I the year The membership on the State insur- lance side was 378. and the total sickness and dis- ablement benefit paid was £ 176 16a. 2d. and m&ternity benefit £ 43 10s. The Secretary men- tioned .that they had lost as many as 15 members by death last year, and of this number 5 had made "the great ?crince" in France, Belgium Fraii ce' B e I 9!12 I or the East. The lodge had had a very Tight sick list, and it was etill going strong in its financial position. I The Chairman gave an interesting address, and referred to the brotherly feeling which ex- isted among them, and pointed out that the society was lounded upon the broad principles of Christianity. He related how, many years EHO, the lodge, in its inception had to borrow mouey in order to pay the sickness benefits of its mem- bers. He laid stress upon the very satisfactory financial position the lodge now occupied, and said that the quinquennial valuation would be made after the end of the present year, after which event it was hoped an important improve- ment would be made in the bonefita. ELECTION OF OFFICERS. T,tees.: Messrs. C. W. Richard? W. G- Dodd and J. E. Roberts; secretary, Mr. W. iv?l-. liams; 8.Qi6tant ..wretary, Mr. J. E. Roberts; treasurer., Mr. Francis Lewis; committee- of management, Messrs. Rowland Edwards, 2. Tan- rallt Terrace, Griffith Morris. 5. Tanrallt Ter- ra.; an., Robert Thomas Williams, PenOre, RhySgog; Llandvnan, Dr. Morris, 4,, Brynder- wen, Rhewl, and Geo. Edwards' Ty lea; Pen- | treiwrv Richard Evans, Hendre and Thes. Davies, Abbey View Terrace, Garth, John E'lls Tvu? groes, Daniel Williams, Brynyberth, fítld John Roberts, Brynygroes; Cefn Mawr, Ritoard ?Tt?aMa Powell, 19. 1tll,.6treét. and ?a.Mur. ?rT?ta-?el. drth; Tiee- grand, B!dwm ?u?hes. 1, TajBr&Ut Terras. I ..ii U. J.

i LLANGOLLEN SMITHFIELD j

LLANGOLLEN SMITHFIELD. j There was a large entry at Messrs. Jones ind Son's; sale' on May 27. the trade being good all round, and an excellent clearance was made. Upwards of 300 fat i-heep were penned, which ware of very good quality. Milkers were making up to 445; calvers to £ 41; barrens to £ 2. and store bullocks and heifers to £ 26. Couples made up to 90s. The trade for store pigs was, as usual, very good, ten-weeks"old pigs making '(,p to 80s. The aext Sale will be held cat Jttrie TOtti.

I4 A Milk Control Board

I 4. A Milk Control Board; DAIRY FARMERS' SCHEME, The Associated Mifk Producers' Council, which is composed of representatives of the National Farmers' Union, the Central Chamber of Agriculture, the. Central Association of Dairy Fanners, the British Dairy Farmers' Association, and the Agricultural > Organisation Society, has prepared; a- scheme for the establishment by Parliament of a Milk Control Board. It is suggested that the Board should oenust of a chairman. appointed by the Government, one Tepre- sentative each of the local Government Board- ar.41 the Board ol Agriculture, three producers' representa- tives BotMi-ated by the. Central Agricultural Advisory Council, three consumers representatives nominated- by the Consumers' Council, and one representative of the retailers. The Board would b'Õ provided with moneys voted by Parliament, And with such staff as it required, and would be charged with the following duties:— To encourage the increased production of milk and the improvement of quality. To encour ttge the increased consumption of whole niilk of good quality. To fix tram time to time the, prices of milk and milk products- To define milk clearing house areas, and to approve, or where necessary establish temporarily, clearing house organisations for those areas. To appoint local milk commissioners, and through them to regulate the distribution of milkU) With a view of preventing unnecessary transoort by seeing that supplies are not sent to a distant market when markets nearer in distance or more accessible are open; (2) with a view of preventing undue shortage of supplies in any district by ttgu- lating distribution according to the total supplies available. To acquire by compulsory purchase wholesale rciVk businesses and depdts other than those owned by producers' associations, and also if necessary n-ilk products factories, and to maintain and manage) them until taken over by producers' associations. To make the necessary arrangements with the rail- way companies for adequate and regular service, P-nd, for the proper care of milk during ttangit, including the provision, where necessary, of rofrigerated cars. The Council consider that if any other agency than the farms' own organisation is set up for carrying out the measures devised under the Milk and Dairies (Consolidation) Act for the improvement of milk supplies, the maintenance. of adequate supplies will be seriously endanagered. They also believe that un- der present conditions the dairy industry requires A reasonable degree of security as regards prices, markets, and conditions of production, and they recognise that this security can be obtained only by conceding to the. State the right to supervise the operations of the farmers' organisations in the lit- terests of the community as a whole, The njenihets of the Council wish it to be understood that they are not in any way committed! to accepting the principle of State control of the dairy industry unless they are satisfied that control will be exercised !-A such a way as to fafeguard the interests of the producer, and that as the scheme has not yet been considered in detail by their constituent associations it must not be assumed that all these are prepared to endorse it. ■

I Chirk Rural District Council

I Chirk Rural District Council. THE, HOUSING SCHEMB. 17 ACRES FOR £ 1,430, The monthly meeting of Ch;T¡{ Sural District; eil was held at Glynceiriog Institute on Tuesday. Present: Messrs. G. Rowley (chairman), W. B. Bavin, Simon Rogers, Richard ZdwarcIA, J. D. Edwards, Vi. E. Thom-ts, R. W. Ell's, C. H. Bull, clerk; E. Green Davies, sanitary inspector; and Dr. J. D. LlOyd, medical officer. Mr. Berrington, the architect And engineer for the new housing schemes, was also present. Bills amounting to 450 15s. 4d. were pissed for$a?- ment. Nuisancer were reported at Garth, Glyn, lower Chirk and Chirk Green, and the clerk was instructed to write to tha people concerned to abatei the nuisances Mr. E. Roberts was appointed assistant clérk to the Council in connection with the work arising ffoai the houting schemes. I FAIR VALUE OF LAND. A letter was received from the district land valuer, stating that he was of opinion that the. sum of 91,430, asked by the Denbighshire County Council for the 17 acres of building Land at Lower Chirk Green, fairly represented the present, value of the land. Mr. Berrington reported favourably on the proposed building site. The Council eventually decided to enter into nego- tiations tor the purchase of the land, and the en- gineer was instructed to proceed with the. levelling, contouring, and iaying-out plans, for the Lower Chirk iite on which it is' intended to build 120 houses. The engineer was further instruced to view sites a.t PontfadDg and Glyn, and report as to their suitability for the erection of workmen's dwellings. Instructions were given to tMclerk to write to the Chirk Water Company, with a view to obtaining water to augment the Council's present supply, and to meet the shortage of water at Black Park, and the future requirements in connection with the ad- d,t,ional houses which are to be'erected.

I Llangollen Soldiers Feted

I Llangollen Soldiers Feted, Llpogollen, on Thursday, accorded a public » welcome to local ex-service men, numbering about 250. Under the direction of Mr. C. E. Crawford (vice-chairman of the Urban Council), a re- presentative committee had been making pre- parations for"the event for some weeks past, and through gaily-decorated streets, crowded with visitors and residents, places of business being closed, a procession marshalled in the Smithfield and proceeded to the Town Hall, where an open-air service was conducted by the Vicar. After an address of welcome by Mr. H. Birch (chairman of the Council), the proces- sion proceeded to the County School grounds for sports, which were followed by a dinner. A ball was held in the evening.

No title

A meeting of male teachers i$London, on Saturday, protested agaiast equal pay tor,. worsen teachers. Sir Auckland Geddes lias arranged to re- ceive a deputatiaa. from the Weleh National Pariitmentary party on Thursday-o4 the oues- tion of the conservation of WiBleu, water gup- plies.. The regulation which made secooAwy schools requiring the majority of the gowrn- ing body to belong to a particular religiou$ denomination ineligible for Government grants is now abolished. „ The Food Controller has issued an ordei fixing the maximum retail prices for bacon and hams, both imported and home produced, as follows :-PaJe, dried, or smoked, 2s. 4d. per pound other than pale, dried, or smoked, 2s. fit